All Questions

0
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0answers
2 views

Genre analysis techniques

I want to characterize a specific genre, for which I have a lot of digital samples (about +100.000 non-annotated words). I know that with textual data mining, common phrases can be extracted if you ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Question about Estonian morphology

I want to lemmatize Estonian text and I found an online lemmatizer to do so, but the lemmatizer gives me strange output. Is there anyone with some knowledge on Estonian (unfortunately, I have none ...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

What is the linguistically process behind prolonging of vowels?

Vowels can change from short vowels to long vowels in time But from a diachronic perspective, what is happening? Please fill in with some examples of vowels that have been prolonged and that have ...
1
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0answers
21 views

Is the labiodental flap used only in the beginning of words?

In 2005, the IPA phonetical alphabet got extended by including the labiodental flap. The wikipedia-page shows a good overview; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labiodental_flap However, I am wondering ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

Classification of documents

Is there any way to classify restaurant reviews as spicy/not spicy? Even if I have a dictionary of words that describe spiciness (eg:hot, bland etc) , how can I go about the classification? Thanks. ...
-1
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0answers
30 views

Dictionary for beginners: looking for existing sources

There are 300 most frequently used words in English. But they render useless for beginers, because there is no context. Therefore, when learners try to use them, they make up senseless sentences: ...
4
votes
0answers
39 views

Why do PIE verbs have suffixes -m-, -s-, -t-, while personal pronouns have m-, t-, s-?

Usually it is assumed that in PIE the verb forms for the singular first, second, and third person are respectively -m-, -s-, -t- (cfr. Latin). The personal pronouns, instead, have the second and ...
-1
votes
2answers
23 views

Looking for word to lemma free database

I want to write a simple program in Java, which being fed with English texts will be able to generate word usage statisitcs (e.g. topmost frequently used words in English). For that purpose I need a ...
-1
votes
1answer
17 views

What is A-movement ? Can I find a short essay that can explain it?

I have been trying to get a summarized idea about A-movement. I wish you could help me out with this . Thanks
1
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0answers
56 views

What are the languages with the greatest number of English cognates/loanwords?

Does there exist data anywhere documenting the number of words that a language shares with English as a function of the language (and, if so, coudld you be so kinds as to refer me to it)? The number ...
-2
votes
0answers
31 views

How do you host a grammar checker online [on hold]

How do you host a grammar checker online? And which are the best articles for grammar checkers?
3
votes
1answer
60 views

How do various frameworks account for situations when multiple cases can be assigned?

My mother and I went to the market. My mother and me went to the market. Many (most?) English speakers today will accept both of these as grammatical. But it would be hard to argue that ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

What Sprachgesetze are suggested by Quantitative Linguistics on semantic level?

Sprachgesetze, verbatimally laws of language, are stochastic statements about features of a language based on empirical evaluation of a corpus. The Sprachgesetze I found are mainly quantitative ...
1
vote
0answers
84 views

Phonological Differences Between Given Names and Surnames [on hold]

I'm writing a CRF parser that splits a name string into components. For example, Bob Belcher => <GivenName>Bob</GivenName> <Surname>Belcher</Surname> Belcher, Bob => ...
-3
votes
0answers
39 views

Question on experiences on the notion meaningfulness of sentences in a society of humans [on hold]

I'm curious if there has ever been any statistical experience on what the meaningfulness of linguistic sentences is among usual people (or any specific society). If yes, I ask you to send me the ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Parsing a personal name

I'm interested in the structure of personal names. I want to parse them into their constituent parts. Is there some sort of grammar for names? The reason for this question is that I want to create a ...
5
votes
1answer
48 views

L1 acquisition of morphology in heavily inflected languages

It is very common to hear two- and three-year-olds in English saying "I falled down," "She gived me it," etc. And the frequency of a verb form is inversely related to the age at which one is likely to ...
0
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0answers
21 views

X bar theory help needed [on hold]

I'm looking for help on 2 questions, I have some understanding but would like more. Can someone put these 2 sentences in x bar form. the big red old boat sailed majestically across the Hudson river. ...
-1
votes
0answers
28 views

Word “austria” in own language [on hold]

What domain name is best choice for an austrian site? (xyz is an example brand)? xyzösterreich.at xyzosterreich.at xyzaustria.at google adwords austrian searches/month googley adwords results: ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Earley Parser: Ambiguity

I've got a pretty basic question concerning the Earley parser: In case of syntactic ambiguity ( S -> NP VP(V NP(NP PP)) vs. S -> NP VP(VP((V NP) PP) ), are both parses stored in one chart or in two? ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Spelling of laryngeals in Proto-Indo-European

Proto-Indo-European has been reconstructed with so-called "laryngeal" consonants, spelled *h1, *h2, and *h3. These were lost in branches other than Hittite but left traces on adjacent short *e as well ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Are imperative verbs starting a command subordinating conjunctions?

I have come across a syntax tree with a subordinate clause phrase (as opposed to just a sentence) whose left daughter is a verb in the imperative, e.g. Wash your laundry tonight. I have read this ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Ei (egg in German) and eye; Auge (eye in German) and egg

Is it known if there was some weird flipping of [Ei (egg in German) and eye] with [Auge(eye in German) and egg] that happened historically or do you think the apparent similarities are coincidence?
1
vote
1answer
34 views

What exactly is the SBAR label from the Penn TreeBank?

From this list of tags: SBAR - Clause introduced by a (possibly empty) subordinating conjunction. This site explains what a subordinating conjunction is. But how can you have an empty ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

How to search Penn TreeBank for arbitrary patterns?

What is a general way to parse the trees in the Penn TreeBank for arbitrary patterns, e.g. perhaps I want all trees which have a plural subject and whose sister VP has a modal verb daughter. ...
-1
votes
0answers
85 views

KOREAN NOODLE EATERS! [on hold]

A wagered dispute has just taken place in what could momentarily be considered Hell's kitchen. In one corner, on the stove, we have a pack of NongShim noodles boiling. In the other corner, we have two ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Combine dictionary lemmatization with stemmer

I'm doing lemmatization as part of a classifier right now. My question is, if it makes sense to first use a dictionary lookup, to find the lemmas (wordnet) and after that additionally, to apply a ...
3
votes
2answers
136 views

Before being borrowed by Europeans, was “hurricane” ever pronounced with an initial “f”?

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, Spanish works about the New World in the 1500s wrote the word we spell in modern English as "hurricane" alternatively as "huracan" or "furacan". A ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Intransitive verbs that take Indirect objects

Can there be intransitive verbs which take an indirect object? In the sentence "It pleases me" is "me" an indirect or direct object? What languages frequently have indirect objects in a sentence ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

“The meaning of words depends solely on mental concepts inside the human brain”

What does "the meaning of words depends solely on mental concepts inside the human brain" illustrate? An internalist or externalist position ? Brief reason why. Thanks !
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What are the benefits of learning Latin using Spanish?

I am a native speaker of Spanish. I also learned English. I am now trying to learn Latin. Obviously, the Spanish --> Latin route is a lot more preferable than the English --> Latin route given that ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Can the entropy per word be caculated precisely?And relation among information theory, semantics, and pragmatics

What we have gotten about the expected per word entropy of random yet grammatical text is just some upper bound of the the expected per word entropy, because we have not found the exact way to compute ...
-2
votes
0answers
26 views

Do languages exist in, whose generic noun prefixes can be combined? [closed]

I have only a short notice on how generic noun prefixes are used. In this example, three words of the Dai-language were shown. Because they all are considered "fruits" within the innate taxonomy of ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

What is the difference between an alveolar trill and a syllabic alveolar trill?

I wanted to understand how to articulate the sound ṛ from IAST (transliteration system for indian languages). On Wikipedia i have found this explanation: ऋ पृ [ərə] (traditional) or [ri] ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Origin and meaning of the surname “Babjak”

I have a question regarding the surname "Babjak". I've been researching its origin and meaning for a while now, but I haven't found anything substantial. As far as I know, it traces its roots to ...
2
votes
2answers
50 views

Other than Scottish rolled “r” and North American rhotacised vowels, are there any differences across “r” sounds in English dialects?

I'm wondering about subtle differences in /r/ sounds across varieties of English. By subtle I mean I want to ignore the obvious large differences such as the trilled "r" in Scottish English and the ...
2
votes
0answers
35 views

What is the origin of the silent visual applause sign?

Using a silent visual applause by flapping one's hands instead of clapping is used by several communities: some deaf communities, some autistic communities and some buddhist communities. It would ...
2
votes
0answers
31 views

Did any indigenous American languages have/develop a word for “Native American”?

Obviously the political landscape of the Americas was a hugely complex thing during the period of European colonization, and what was true of one Native American group was almost never true of all of ...
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

common words: would vs could [closed]

How could I go about quantifying the differences in usage between would versus could? I would go the the park. I could go to the park. These days there are a number of data sets on the web ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

What are the IPA equivalents for the special characters used to transscribe indian words?

When I try to read an article related to India (in particular indo-aryan languages) certain special characters emerge which I do not know how to pronounciate. For instance: Aṣṭādhyāyī of Pāṇini ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

What phonologically redundant features can capture the characteristic of a voice more specifically?

Background-Explanation: A sound can be described by a list of articulatory features: If the list is sufficient to determine the function of the sound in a particular language, it matches the ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Word commonly tagged as noun but use as verb

Given a sentence "Someone has to walk the shore and map the island, see what else there is". The "map" word is a verb, but it's commonly used as noun, i.e., in most of dictionaries, the first word ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

Which grammar framework the terms “predicate/ complement/ adjunct” belong to?

From wiki, there're a number of grammar frameworks. Which framework the terms "predicate/ complement/ adjunct" belong to?
0
votes
0answers
27 views

How many different relations exist for a semantic net?

I have encountered a few random sources, that explains to a layman what a semantic net is. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONV38l39PsE this source explains, there are three different relations ...
0
votes
2answers
39 views

Can't understand the meaning of a sentence [closed]

I'm translating the following video from English to Russian: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjCclg_TU0o - it's an interview with John Cusack. I can't get what's the meaning of what he said on 3:20 - ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

What sub-field in linguistics should I study to help me learn foreign languages?

I'm interested in languages and linguistics, can speak a few languages (English, French, Mandarin, some German, Japanese, and Esperanto) and would like to eventually learn more (Japanese, Spanish, ...
1
vote
3answers
60 views

Mandative construction verb form problem

A question asked on another forum concerned the use of different verb forms in the subordinate clause in the following "mandative" sentences: It's important that you do not be late It's ...
2
votes
3answers
114 views

Why are infinitive complements analysed as separate clauses?

Why is the sentence John wants to read. normally analysed as consisting of 2 clauses? (John wants, PRO to read) I understand the idea of PRO but why must to read be a completely different ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Are the unreleased stops in cantonese discernable by listening?

Background-Info: In contrast to mandarin Chinese, which can only have a few consonants at the and of a syllable, e.g. man, mang, Cantonese syllables can contain p,t,k at their end. Nevertheless, ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Identifying phrasal verbs

I'm helping some native English speakers to learn Swedish. I have a large list of sentences which I wish to organise by linking each sentence to its associated set of meanings. For example: Jag: ...

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