0
votes
0answers
19 views

tree diagrams of a question

I am having trouble drawing a syntax tree for 3 sentences and I would appreciate it if someone could help me. The sentences are: 1-when did the man find the job? .
-1
votes
0answers
16 views

What's the biggest dictionary in the world?

I'm curious to know: what is the biggest dictionary in the world? The English and Malgache Wiktionaries are surely not far of with 3.8M and 3.5M entries but I found a blog post talking about a ...
2
votes
0answers
16 views

Are different “aspects” of a Polish verb the same lexeme or different lexemes?

Polish verbs have two "aspects", imperfective and perfective, which means you use a different word depending on whether the activity you're describing is ongoing or habitual, or if it's definite or ...
-2
votes
0answers
23 views

Is a sentence, composed of mainclause and subclause, represented by one or two syntax-trees?

I read, that one sentence can have different syntax-trees what is considered a phrase is dependent on the grammar used there are a lot of grammars, basically divided into two groups: ...
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

Who introduced the concept of phrases in grammar?

My impression is that this term is used in prescriptive works teaching grammars as well as in scientific context dealing with syntax. How can one trace the emergence of this concept back in ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

How many different syntax patterns exist in standard English ?

My command of the English language is quiet poor, I write by my feeling, and each sentence is just another chain element left behind not knowing how many Errors are within it. The feeling comes close ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Why might ergativity be correlated with polypersonal agreement?

The Wikipedia article on polypersonal agreement states that it "has also been correlated with ergativity." This is certainly true of Basque, the only ergative language I have any familiarity with. ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Can Malay or Indonesian ever have an /n/ followed by a /g/?

Malay and Indonesian are considered to be very phonetically spelled with the usually cited exception being that orthographic "e" can represent either /e/ or /ə/. In both orthographies the sound /ŋ/ ...
4
votes
1answer
73 views

Can you give some examples of counter-intuitive phenomena discovered by linguists?

By counter-intuitive I mean, contrary to intuition of native speakers of some language, or contrary to some popular knowledge about languages (apart many cases of folk etymology)? (e. g. "strange" ...
6
votes
3answers
714 views

Descendants of Latin vs. Greek?

From Latin there descend half a dozen (or more) modern languages. Greek, by contrast, has simply changed over time but without branching into separate languages. Why the difference? Both were spoken ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Abbot & Costello “Who's on First” with a pragmatic (or other linguistic) perspective?

I'm in my first year of the Master's study in applied linguistics, and I'm trying to come up with my research question, which will form the basis of my thesis topic. I've found the famous routine by ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

Chomsky's Universal grammar and Evolution of human languages

I've recently came across Chomsky's universal grammar, and I'm very much wondering about one specific question. I was trying to find references, however didn't find any explanation in the huge amount ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

What method of teaching foreign languages is more effective?

In wikipedia i found a list of methods of teaching foreign languages - language pedagogy. But it's seems that we not have a well recognized method or methods, or more effective then others, or at ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Meaning of PIE noun/adjective suffixes

I want to know the meaning of the following PIE suffixes. -to-s -ko-s -lo-s (form of -ros?) -i̯o-s (origin/possession, apparently from pronoun i̯os) -mo-s (object of continued action?) -u̯o-s -no-s ...
-1
votes
0answers
25 views

Can every language express any lexical aspect?

Wikipedia tells about the difference and relation between lexical aspect and grammatical aspect. Whereas the lexical aspect is a specific way to put focus onto how to observe an event on a semantic ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

What linguistic subfield(s) deals with the esthetics of syntax?

In advance, to prevent missunderstanding, I want to underline, that I am not talking about Prescriptive Grammar. A certain idea, event, chain of events or a whole story can be realised in more than ...
1
vote
5answers
116 views

Words understood in all languages?

Is there any words that probably will be understood by “everyone” in the world? I understand that this question need a lot of clarifications and conditions. Some being: A word – an oral word, not ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

What is an affix called that is interlocked?

Wikipedia mentions 4 subgroups of affixes: prefix, the affix is in front of the word suffix, the affix is behind the word infix, the affix is within the word circumfix, the afix is separated into ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Preposition vs. Subordinating Conjunction in English

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston & Pullum), which was published in 2002, expanded the scope of the part of speech "preposition" to such a great extent that a significant ...
2
votes
2answers
275 views

πίστις & ἐλπίζω related linguistically?

This is stemming from a question on BH-SE. Are faith (πίστις) and hope (ἐλπίς) related linguistically? Is it at all possible that ἐλπίς is actually el/eli + πίστις or something + faith? If not, is ...
2
votes
1answer
93 views

Why do time adverbials like “yesterday” have a different distribution than adverbials like “always?”

Consider these two sentences below, which employ some kind of temporal adverbial / adjunct. (I) Yesterday John won the Turkey Raffle. (II) John always wins the Turkey Raffle. My question is, why ...
4
votes
3answers
134 views

What is the most recent example of a language which has split from another and become non-mutually comprehensible?

I know linguists like to say "no languages are older or younger than other languages" because they all evolved from ancient roots. With exceptions such as Nicaraguan Sign Language. So let me explain ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Seme structure of words

In my research of the concept I have analysed lexemes that consist of semes. When I describe the structure of the lexeme, can I use the term 5 semic structure of units?
-1
votes
0answers
28 views

What are some good resources for teaching about different kinds of synthetic speech?

would like to organize a workshop where students develop different synthetic voices comparing different techniques. Are there any user friendly resources for developing or manipulating (rate, ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Strange writings on a cup

I found this cup in the office: Even some of the letters on it seem odd. Can anybody tell me, what these writings mean?
1
vote
1answer
31 views

“Regarding” in Korean and Japanese

To mark what is being regarded in Japanese is について (nitsuite), and in Korean, 에, but do these two concepts completely overlap? 돼지고기에 질렸어요. I got tired of pork Would a translation into Japanese ...
0
votes
3answers
67 views

What is the IPA notation for Chinese zuo4cuo4 做错?

zuo4cuo4 is the pinyin-notation for 做错 = doing wrong. To my ear zuo4 and cuo4 sound very similar. I need the IPA notation to understand the difference in articulation.
1
vote
0answers
43 views

What is the origin and meaning of the word/name “Idora”?

I apologize if I have included too many details. This is a 150+ year mystery that has many pieces. I have included some of what I have discovered in hopes of aiding anyone who is interested in helping ...
4
votes
0answers
40 views

Which mutually intelligible language groups are spoken by more than 1 million people in Cameroon?

Which mutually intelligible language groups are spoken by more than 1 million people in Cameroon? Wikipedia is not very helpful. the map below is the most useful thing I found thus far, which teaches ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Raising aspectual verb “stop”

On this webpage http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/~gpullum/grammar/nonfiniteclauses.html prof.Geoffrey Pullum's explains basic syntactic tests used in distinguishing raised from ordinary subjects/verbs. The ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

X-bar analysis of Copular verbs?

Can someone help me with the analysis of copular or linking verbs in X-bar theory. What would be the position of subject in sentences like "Mary is beautiful". Is "Mary" the theme of adjectival ...
3
votes
8answers
211 views

What's the use of Grammar?

There's a question that bothered me for a long time when I am learning another language. English is not my first language, so when I was being taught, they told me all these grammars like like the ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

Correctness of Wiktionary IPA Translation

The logo for Wikimedia's Wiktionary project features a narrow transcription IPA of the term: Adding English syllabification produces [ˈwɪk.ʃənˌrɪ] (WICK-shun-rih), which I find strange. I personally ...
3
votes
2answers
55 views

Are there letters or diacritics in the IPA suitable for narrow/phonetic descriptions of the Malay final -h?

In Malay there is a syllable-final -h with some unique properties distinct from the "normal" syllable-initial h. But in all the accounts of the language I can only see a single symbol used, the ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Genre analysis techniques

I want to characterize a specific genre, for which I have a lot of digital samples (about +100.000 non-annotated words). I know that with textual data mining, common phrases can be extracted if you ...
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

What is the linguistically process behind prolonging of vowels?

Vowels can change from short vowels to long vowels in time But from a diachronic perspective, what is happening? Please fill in with some examples of vowels that have been prolonged and that have ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Is the labiodental flap used only in the beginning of words?

In 2005, the IPA phonetical alphabet got extended by including the labiodental flap. The wikipedia-page shows a good overview. However, I am wondering if the labiodental flap is restricted to be ...
-2
votes
1answer
38 views

Classification of documents [on hold]

Is there any way to classify restaurant reviews as spicy/not spicy? Even if I have a dictionary of words that describe spiciness (eg:hot, bland etc) , how can I go about the classification? Thanks. ...
-1
votes
0answers
34 views

Dictionary for beginners: looking for existing sources

There are 300 most frequently used words in English. But they render useless for beginers, because there is no context. Therefore, when learners try to use them, they make up senseless sentences: ...
7
votes
1answer
87 views

Why do PIE verbs have suffixes -m-, -s-, -t-, while personal pronouns have m-, t-, s-?

Usually it is assumed that in PIE the verb forms for the singular first, second, and third person are respectively -m-, -s-, -t- (cfr. Latin). The personal pronouns, instead, have the second and ...
-1
votes
2answers
29 views

Looking for word to lemma free database

I want to write a simple program in Java, which being fed with English texts will be able to generate word usage statisitcs (e.g. topmost frequently used words in English). For that purpose I need a ...
-1
votes
1answer
22 views

What is A-movement ? Can I find a short essay that can explain it?

I have been trying to get a summarized idea about A-movement. I wish you could help me out with this . Thanks
1
vote
0answers
83 views

What are the languages with the greatest number of English cognates/loanwords?

Does there exist data anywhere documenting the number of words that a language shares with English as a function of the language (and, if so, coudld you be so kinds as to refer me to it)? The number ...
-2
votes
0answers
36 views

How do you host a grammar checker online [closed]

How do you host a grammar checker online? And which are the best articles for grammar checkers?
3
votes
1answer
71 views

How do various frameworks account for situations when multiple cases can be assigned?

My mother and I went to the market. My mother and me went to the market. Many (most?) English speakers today will accept both of these as grammatical. But it would be hard to argue that ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

What Sprachgesetze are suggested by Quantitative Linguistics on semantic level?

Sprachgesetze, verbatimally laws of language, are stochastic statements about features of a language based on empirical evaluation of a corpus. The Sprachgesetze I found are mainly quantitative ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

Phonological Differences Between Given Names and Surnames [closed]

I'm writing a CRF parser that splits a name string into components. For example, Bob Belcher => <GivenName>Bob</GivenName> <Surname>Belcher</Surname> Belcher, Bob => ...
-3
votes
0answers
41 views

Question on experiences on the notion meaningfulness of sentences in a society of humans [closed]

I'm curious if there has ever been any statistical experience on what the meaningfulness of linguistic sentences is among usual people (or any specific society). If yes, I ask you to send me the ...
-1
votes
0answers
69 views

Structure of personal names

I'm interested in the structure of personal names. I want to parse them into their constituent parts. Is there some sort of grammar for names? The reason for this question is that I want to create a ...
6
votes
1answer
65 views

L1 acquisition of morphology in heavily inflected languages

It is very common to hear two- and three-year-olds in English saying "I falled down," "She gived me it," etc. And the frequency of a verb form is inversely related to the age at which one is likely to ...

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