Words that describe or modify a noun or noun phrase.

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adjective features - similar to beth Levin's verb classes?

Beth Levin published research on verb classes/alternations - is there similar for the adjective category of words? I can see references to countable/uncountable, gradable,absolute, of quantity/quality ...
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Definite or indefinite adjectives with possessive personal determiners in Germanic?

While both German and Danish have different forms of adjectives in definite and indefinite noun phrases, noun phrases with possessive personal determiners pattern with the indefinite noun phrases in ...
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231 views

What really makes adverbs different from adjectives?

I just tried to answer a question that amounted to knowing whether adverbs can be inflected. Then, doing a bit of search for examples, I came up with the impression that, in many cases, I could not ...
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Adjective terms for modifier of a preceding subject and modifier of following noun?

I am wondering if there is a term for an adjective that modifies a preceding subject (e.g. I am happy.) and one that modifies what follows (e.g. I am a happy person.).
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Does Korean have two classes of adjectives correlating to the -i and -na adjectives of Japanese?

It's widely claimed that Japanese and Korean have very similar grammars despite their differences in (non Chinese-derived) lexicon. Whether they're actually genetically related can be regarded as an ...
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Can predicate adjectives take more modifiers than attributive adjectives in English? Across languages?

Witness this noun phrase that has an attributive adjective: "the angry girl" Witness this sentence that has a predicate adjective: "The girl is angry." Both adjectives in the last two ...
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Across languages that have adjectives, what are the most common grammatical inflections for adjectives?

Not all languages have adjectives; some use adjectival nouns ("red.one" instead of "red") and/or stative verbs ("be.red" instead of "red"). Among languages that have adjectives, not all allow ...
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Multiple Adjectives in an X-Bar Tree

I'm having some trouble integrating phrases with multiple adjectives into x-bar trees. Based on what I can understand from the textbook, I would get something like this (apologies for the verb ...
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493 views

English Phrase Structure Rules and adjectives

I am learning about English grammar, but as a programmer, I have natually gravitated towards learning about syntactic structure. I am learning from university lecture notes which I found through ...
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550 views

What's the term for a word that can be read both as a noun and an adjective depending on where it is used?

Example: headstrong As a noun: The headstrong don't easily give up. As an adjective: The headstrong youth.
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How to check the distance beween comparative adjectives?

It is known that distances (intervals) between (I could be wrong in the choice of words) "very bad", "bad", "not bad", "good", "very good" are approximately equal. Such equality of intervals was used ...
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Why does the Georgian adverb მწარედ (mtsared) “bitterly” end in -ედ rather than -ად?

According to the materials I possess or can find on the Internet, Georgian adverbs derived from nouns end in -ად (-ad) (unless the noun in the nominative ends in -ო (-o) or -უ (-u), in which case the ...
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322 views

Examples of Equative Genitive Adjectival Languages

Sorry for the confusing title, but I'm not aware of any common linguistic terms for the concepts at hand, so I'm kinda making them up as I go. So I'll start by explaining the question. There are a ...
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What is the origin of the Latin suffix -alis/-alia?

What is the origin of the Latin suffix -alis/-alia? Can it be an Etruscan borrowing? Is Russian adjectival suffix -аль- a borrowing from Latin?
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250 views

Are there languages where adjectives are clearly neither noun-like nor verb-like?

Most language I have some knowledge of have adjectives with are either a) nominal in nature or b) verbal in nature. (apologies if this is not the best wording.) In German, Romanian, and Georgian, ...
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446 views

Are there languages with more than three degrees of comparison?

In English and other languages there are three degrees of comparison: positive, comparative and superlative (e.g. tall, taller, tallest). Are there languages with more than three degrees, expressed ...
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320 views

Does any language use bound morphology to express the concept “less”?

In English, many adjectives support the -er ending to express a notion of exceeding: John is taller than Mary (is). Mary is smarter than John (is). Of course, you can also have the more analytic ...
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English words which are both verbs and adjectives

A question about UI design led me to speculate about English words which are both a verb and an adjective. My answer to the question addresses this linguistics issue as the root of the UI issue. I ...
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Is there any difference in meaning or nuance when the adjective follows the noun in Georgian?

Many languages allow the order of adjectives compared to nouns to vary, but for different reasons: Some languages have very free word order in which case there is little difference between adj + ...
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563 views

How can adjective-noun order in French be explained by parameter theory?

I just finished reading The Atoms of Language. The gist is that languages have parameters, one of which will tell you which side of a phrase to add a new word. But in some languages, like French and ...
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572 views

Are there any other rules for adjective order?

At the English Language and Usage Stackexchange site, the question was asked What is the rule for adjective order? and the answer boiled down to: (article) + number + judgement/attitude + size + ...