A grammatical morpheme that must be attached to a host word of an appropriate kind.

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2
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3answers
152 views

Are Japanese honorific お and ご prefixes, particles, or both?

In Japanese there are two morphemes which are used before certain nouns as part of the honorific system: お (o) ご (go) Which terms can be used to refer to these out of "prefix" and "particle"? I ...
0
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0answers
34 views

suffixoid vs null interfix

As written in Kremer, 1997 and Štekauer, 1995 words like ‘cat-like’ or ‘congressman’ etc. have what they call suffixoids or semiaffixes. IMO, it’s kind of a dull idea, because they look like ...
4
votes
2answers
132 views

Agglutinative vs. Analytic. What's the difference?

First of all, I understand that these typological distinctions are not absolute and almost all languages show signs of almost all morphological strategies but most display a certain tendency towards ...
6
votes
1answer
102 views

What is the postfix that makes “figurine” diminutive of “figure”?

"figurine" means "little figure". From etymonline: figurine (n.) [Look up figurine at Dictionary.com] 1854, from French figurine (16c.), from Italian figurina, diminutive of figura, from ...
4
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0answers
175 views

What exactly is the “i” in iPad, iPhone, iMac etc. linguistically speaking?

You might ask now: What does the "i" stand for? Well, according to the following article http://www.iphonejd.com/iphone_jd/2009/01/the-i-in-iphone.html the "i" was originally meant to stand ...
3
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1answer
404 views

Can words be formed by deriving from just prefix(es) and suffix(es) with no actual root morpheme between?

I was just looking at a Zulu word entry in Wiktionary that implied it was made from a prefix and a suffix, but there was nothing between them. Now this could just be sloppy editing of Wiktionary but ...
2
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0answers
86 views

Which prefixing language has the most speakers?

Most if not all national or widely spoken languages with an inflecting or agglutinating typology do all of their inflecting at the end of the word. These are called "suffixing languages". This is ...
5
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1answer
105 views

Specifically in terms of nepomorpha, nepidae and further taxonomic classifications

I believe that the meaning of morpha is "form, like, kind". But where does the nepo prefix originate from? I seem to get a lot of terms like 'nepotism' in my searches, but I wonder how purely aquatic ...
7
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3answers
893 views

What is the function of “-ter” in words “laughter” and “daughter”?

Because there exists a word "laugh" but "*daugh", while the forms are alike to each other. I can't find the function of the morpheme "-ter" here, which is maybe irrelevant to the "-ter" in "enter" or ...
4
votes
4answers
172 views

Is there any language that observe root changes in response to the addition of affixes?

If yes, what are the examples? What change patterns are exhibited? *modified from Area51
10
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3answers
694 views

What are the criteria that distinguish clitics/particles from affixes?

This question inspired me to finally ask a question that has been bothering me for years: how does one distinguish clitics and/or particles from affixes, especially when those clitics are ...