Tagged Questions

Single phone consisting of a stop phase followed by a fricative phase.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
86 views

A question about /t/ + fricative /r/ vs /tr/ affrication

So in most accents of English, /r/ is fricated when it follows /t/ and /d/ word-initially, and in some it has become a full affricate /tʃ/. If you were going to look at a spectrogram of this, how ...
3
votes
1answer
192 views

Do any languages have half-voiced affricates?

While hearing something on the radio in Lisbon, I heard this phrase: A lei diz que tu não podes... (The law says you can't...) The word that interests me the most is the last one podes which is ...
3
votes
1answer
440 views

What is the syllable structure of a word with an affricate in the onset?

If a word has an affricate in the onset, let's say /ts/, along with another consonant, let's say /k/, to make a word like /tski/, is the phonotactic syllable structure of this word CCV or is it CCCV?
9
votes
4answers
768 views

Why are /t/ and /d/ sometimes affricated before /ɹ/ in English?

I saw a post on ELU about a more general question, Softened pronunciation of consonants, such as “t” or “s” followed by “y”. The question was answered in regard to palatalization, especially for ...
27
votes
5answers
5k views

Is there a difference between an affricate and a plosive+fricative consonant cluster?

Is there a difference between an affricate and a plosive+fricative consonant cluster? According to wikipedia, there is a difference between a plosive+fricative sequence, as in the following example ...