The variety of English used in the United States of America.

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5
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2answers
302 views

Correct syllabification in (American) English

I need to figure out what the proper syllabification of words in American English is and why. PLEASE NOTE: I am interested in syllabification from a phonetic point of view, not in terms of ...
1
vote
2answers
194 views

Am I a native English speaker? (born I Hungary, lived in US from age 3)

I'm not sure if I'm going to get any answers, but I am trying to find out whether I can qualify as a native english speaker. Here's my story: born in Hungary moved to US at age 3 spoke Hungarian ...
2
votes
1answer
156 views

What is the cause of the epenthetic ‘r’ in ‘warsh’?

Why does this ‘r’ appear only in ‘wash’ and ‘Washington’ without analogous examples? That is, why does this ‘r’ not also appear in similar constructions (like ‘posh’ (which is never pronounced ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Stress rules in English adjective-noun combinations

In English adjective-noun combinations the noun commonly carries the main stress: a big HOUSE a beautiful DOG An exception to this rule are adjective-noun combinations that are treated as one ...
0
votes
1answer
121 views

Characteristics of African American Vernacular English

The actor in this Youtube comedy video seems to be imitating African American Vernacular English (AAVE). I wonder how successful he is. The grammatical features seem to be pretty accurate: y'all as ...
1
vote
0answers
112 views

Different accent for different genders and age groups

Probably due to a desire to sound cute or otherwise I find teens (girls mostly) using an accent wherein they have to pout their lips a bit more in speaking while this may give them a more appealing ...
0
votes
1answer
464 views

Phonological vowel length in American English due to (t-)flapping

The following is a quote from a Wikipedia page on American English phonology and concerns flapping in American English: The flapping of intervocalic /t/ and /d/ to alveolar tap [ɾ] before ...
2
votes
0answers
73 views

What percentage of African Americans speak identifiable African American Vernacular English?

I'm looking for (reasonably) scientific statistics on the percentage of African Americans whose speech is sufficiently inflected with AAVE that their speech is identifiable as such. (It would be ...
2
votes
0answers
94 views

What are the allophones of /ɹ/ in General Western English?

What are the allophones of /ɹ/ in General Western English? By General Western English, I mean the dialect of English that is spoken by people raised in Seattle, WA; Portland, OR; and other ...
7
votes
1answer
548 views

IPA transcription of the American English “bunched” /r/

There are 2 common articulations of /r/ and /r̩/ in American English, one retroflex, and the other dorsal. This phone is called the molar or bunched r. It can be described roughly as a back-palatal or ...
3
votes
7answers
3k views

Why do people singing in English sound like Americans?

This is just my observation, but it seems like Standard American English lacks any distinct accent when speaking. Listen to almost any person singing with an accent, and they sound like any American ...
3
votes
7answers
3k views

Is rhyming a uniquely English language construct?

I will freely admit that this question is based in ignorance of languages other than English (well, American). But do other languages have the concept of rhyming? Thinking back to my few Spanish ...
8
votes
3answers
328 views

Why does Pidgin come easier than Standard English?

I was born and raised in Hawaii and grew up speaking Pidgin. My parents are from Washington and California so at home I spoke [what I thought was] Standard English. I moved to the mainland when I was ...
2
votes
3answers
108 views

Is there a US/UK difference in interpretation/usage of “compound verb phrases” split by an embedded clause

Arising from discussion against “Against traffic” or “Against the traffic” on ELU, I wonder if anyone can give an authoritative opinion and/or supporting evidence for the proposition that Americans ...
7
votes
4answers
490 views

Why in English words, the [o] is followed by [ʊ]?

The close-mid back rounded vowel is, according to Wikipedia, "usually diphthongized to [oʊ]". Examples: row, also. In fact, in Cambridge English Pronouncing Dictionary I didn't see o standing ...