Words that have a common etymological origin.

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1answer
51 views

Is the Indian female name “Sati” the same as the self-immolating Hindu goddess? [closed]

I heard about an Indian woman (possibly Hindu) with a given name of Sati the other day. Checking the internet, this site confirmed that Sati is an Indian female name. Is the name "Sati" related to ...
4
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0answers
75 views

How can we support that two words with different meanings are cognate?

Consider this excerpt from this etymology of "lose": Old English losian "be lost, perish," from los "destruction, loss," from Proto-Germanic * lausa- (cognates: Old Norse los "the breaking up of ...
6
votes
1answer
136 views

Why the grammatical difference between “eu gosto” in Portuguese and “me gusta” in Spanish. What's the historical evolution of this expression?

Apparently, "eu" is the subject in "eu gosto (de isso)" while "me" is the object in "me gusta (algo)". Why such a difference between two languages? What's the historical evolution of this expression?
4
votes
3answers
155 views

Is there a website where you can find cognates of certain word in other IE branches?

Just as in the title :) I wonder if there is a tool on the internet which would help in finding cognates of certain word in as much branches as possible. Say I want to find find all the cognates in ...
2
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0answers
62 views

Downloadable list of Romance-language cognates?

I'm looking for tables of cognates between French, Spanish and Italian (and potentially Latin, Portuguese, Catalan, etc.), so I can run some Python on them. If they could have extra information such ...
7
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1answer
159 views

How can I check whether 'question' in English, and 'xahesh' in Persian are cognates?

It seems plausible to me, and I would like to know how to verify it. Why I think xahesh might be cognate with question: xahesh (IPA: /xɑːheʃ/) in Modern Persian is a noun meaning "request, plea". ...
2
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2answers
338 views

German long “o” vs. “au”. Is there a rule?

There are common words in Germanic languages that have a long "o" vowel in the stem, and which in modern German seem to be either "o" or "au" randomly. Examples: Dutch ROOD, Swedish RÖD, German ROT ...
3
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0answers
104 views

What are the languages with the greatest number of English cognates/loanwords?

Does there exist data anywhere documenting the number of words that a language shares with English as a function of the language (and, if so, coudld you be so kinds as to refer me to it)? The number ...
4
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1answer
196 views

Are L. domus and L. domō cognates?

domus From Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root *demh₂- (“to build”). Cognates include Ancient Greek δόμος (dómos), Albanian dhomë (“a chamber, a room”), Sanskrit दम (dáma) and Proto-Slavic *domъ. ...
5
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2answers
1k views

Is a loanword also a cognate or are the two terms mutually exclusive?

A borrowing or loanword is when a word from language A is added to the lexicon of language B, with whatever phonological adaptations are necessary. But is a cognate only a word directly inherited ...
3
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2answers
698 views

Can the root ש ל ם be used to mean “Submission”?

In Arabic, the root S-L-M (س ل م) has a general meaning of "Peace", but can also be used for "Submission" (such as in the words Islam/Muslim). Given the close relation between Hebrew and Arabic, I'm ...
15
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2answers
7k views

What's the difference between a “false cognate” and a “false friend”?

There are two terms used for pairs of words (in the same or different languages) that look similar but are actually unrelated: false friend and false cognate. Are these terms synonymous? If not, what'...
12
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6answers
25k views

Weird behavior of two fruits' names (ananas/pineapple, banana/plátano)

Some time ago I found two tables that reported the names for two fruits, which were supposed to be funny, because they specifically reported a single exception among those several languages, where ...
8
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3answers
257 views

Where can I find a reliable academic source of translations of words to the world's languages?

In this recent question, I was trying to research a list of translation for "no", and a quick google found this page. That website also has other similar pages, like translation of "Hello", "Good ...