Constructed languages are opposed to natural languages, which means they didn't evolve through time but rather were created by a single person or a group for some purpose. (Note: Read Tag Wiki about this Tag usage)

learn more… | top users | synonyms

7
votes
5answers
176 views

Is linguistics limited to natural languages?

Or would linguistics also include the study of accessory languages like esperanto, artificial languages like Klingon, or even programming languages?
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Resources on 'Siberian language'

Siberian language (Ru) is an artificial language project which used to have its wiki pages. Unfortunately, due to the bizzare political processes in modern Russia, the pages were deleted and the ...
4
votes
2answers
143 views

Why is Ivrit not considered an artificial language?

Why is Ivrit, the modern version of Hebrew, not considered an artificial language like for example Interlingua? From the history it looks like the language was dead except in clerical circles and ...
1
vote
0answers
129 views

Fundamental features for program that helps you build a translator?

I'm an absolute rookie with this stuff, but I'm building a translation program, which will hopefully enable people to create their own translators to share with the world. I'm particularly excited for ...
4
votes
6answers
402 views

Why are artificial languages created always by individuals and not by international institutions?

Do linguists and scientist have some international coordinated program/authority where the goal is to create the artificial language for all peoples on this planet? As far as I know, this was always ...
4
votes
2answers
208 views

Could a constructed non-symbolic language be created?

Would the proper term for it really be "non-symbolic language"? Every language up until now uses symbols at various forms – vowel sounds and consonants are symbols; syllables, which are ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

What sort of criteria are used to deem a language description complete?

I'm not a field linguist but my hobby overlaps with it, particularly the descriptive part. At the far ends, with remnant langauges (Virginian Algonquin) and well studied mega-lingua francas like ...
7
votes
4answers
416 views

Why are some linguists and other people very much against conlangs?

There are linguists that are very much against conlanging, here are two commonly claimed reasons: It's not science. It wastes manpower, time and energy that should have been used to rescue an ...
0
votes
3answers
180 views

What makes a good constructed language?

There are some constructed languages that are extremely precise, yet extremely difficult (Ithkuil), some that are easy to learn, but a bit too flexible (Esperanto), and tons in between. What criteria ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

What can one gain from learning language constructed for books or films, like Sindarin? [closed]

I know about people who learn, use and even develop the constructed languages created for books or films, such as Sindarin. Most of them are doing it because of a very geek interest in the topic, or ...
1
vote
1answer
126 views

Are there any an university faculty for artificial (constructed) languages? [closed]

Are there currently any faculty on university that is dedicted for artificial languages, or has speciality for such languages? I mean, where you can study them, write Master's thesis for them, ...
11
votes
1answer
241 views

How did Esperanto find “early adopters” for the language?

Even with the volume of constructed languages that exist, I've never seen formal analysis documenting the successive approaches Esperanto took in an effort to really engage and convert "early ...
2
votes
1answer
202 views

is the percentage of people studying constructed languages increasing?

It seems it is very difficult to count the people able to speak to some degree some artificial language (or maybe any language in general), for instance is Esperanto usage surging, stable, declining? ...
3
votes
1answer
590 views

What did people really speak in Europe around the time and place of the setting of the movie 'the quest for fire"?

For the 1981 film, "Quest For Fire", the late linguist, Anthony Burgess, constructed a language called Ulam (or at least that was the tribe's name). Given that I'm helping a friend who's an ...
9
votes
2answers
246 views

Is anyone studying change in constructed language?

Is there any serious work being done on linguistic change in constructed languages (e.g. Esperanto, Interlingua, Lojban)? I would imagine it might be difficult given the small population of native ...
4
votes
2answers
305 views

What are the rationale of people speaking/teaching Esperanto? [closed]

According to Wikipedia, Esperanto's goal was: to create an easy-to-learn and politically neutral language that would foster peace and international understanding between people with different ...