a word used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate, such as *is* in English

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Are linking/copula verbs only followed by Adjectives and Nouns?

The diagram is from a lesson given by someone on YT. My question is with regard to the Adv phrases that follow the linking/copula verb. My understanding is that only predicate adjectives or predicate ...
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203 views

Has the term or the concept of a “copula” ceased to be used/relevant in modern linguistics?

In the comments on a recent question of mine about copulas and Chinese it has been stated: ... the concept of "copula" is a medieval invention of Latin grammarians, and not a modern linguistic ...
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1answer
100 views

Could certain adjectives or adverbs be analysed to function as a type of copula in Mandarin Chinese?

Chinese (I've only had experience with Mandarin so far) has at least one or two equivalents to English to be, such as "在" (zài) and "是" (shì). Now I know that Chinese adjectives are actually verbs so ...
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1answer
150 views

Interchangeable arguments with English copula

Is there a name for this phenomena with the English copula "to be"? 1a - "My day off is Saturday" 1b - "Saturday is my day off" 2a - "John is a doctor" 2b - *"A doctor is John" I think ...
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1answer
245 views

Are all copulas lexical verbs?

Normally, copulas hold a subject complement (or a predicate in any case). Example. The sky became clear. I am ill. But what is in the definition of a lexical verb that makes copulas lexical verbs? ...
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0answers
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Are the two Lao (and Isan) words for “to be”, “ເປັນ” (pen) and “ແມ່ນ” (maen), etymologically related?

I've just learned that Lao has two words for "to be", that are mostly interchangeable: ເປັນ (pen) ແມ່ນ (maen) They both begin with a labial, have an "e-like" vowel, and end "n". I think it's ...
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5answers
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What is the difference between a copula and a transitive verb?

I can only speak from an English perspective. Be seems to me to be a transitive verb, when joining a subject and an object, yet it is described as a copula. What I mean is The bullseye is the ...
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1answer
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Is there a proposed parameter of 'copula-drop'?

There is a property of languages with respect to copula (a verb 'to be' to mark equivalent thing): the copula may be necessary, or prohibited (and more complex mixtures of necessary and prohibited. ...
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6answers
973 views

Are there languages with a totally regular conjugation for “to be” outside Quechua?

I recently noticed that most languages have an irregular conjugation for the verb To be. I say almost because I don't know all languages, but the ones I've seen all have some irregularity sooner or ...
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When does copula absence occur in African-American Vernacular English?

In what contexts can the zero copula occur in African-American Vernacular English? What rules govern its use—for example, what makes she runnin' more likely to be acceptable than ?she a runner? Some ...