A Germanic language, which originated from England, and is considered the leading language in international communication.

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14 views

small clauses - are they always ellipted/ellided/gapped?

My son Josh and I have come across the terms "gapping" and "ellipsis". Well, I always thought ellipsis was"..." and meant you were reporting information with omissions - but it seems it may also mean ...
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1answer
39 views

English verbs - how many types/classifications?

I've been looking at English to help my teen out, readying for college. Didn't realise how little I knew. In this specific case, I'm stuck with the large number of types of verb - finite/infinite, ...
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53 views

Why is October the tenth month even though Octo means eight?

And it's not only that! Novem is Latin for nine, and Decem is ten, and yet the months are eleventh and twelfth respectively. What's the origin of that? Why are the months called the way the are ...
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1answer
57 views

Have the spelling systems of lingua francas historically been less phonetic than those of native languages?

Lingua francas exist because they allow people with different native languages to communicate, with an emphasis on flexibility to the detriment of rigor. Were a lingua franca's spelling made strictly ...
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1answer
60 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In http://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/29140/is-or-are-the-only-thing-that-i-want-you-to-hit-right-now-is-are-the-books/29170#29170, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold ...
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3answers
137 views

Do native speakers of different languages make different mistakes in English?

Do native speakers of different languages make different mistakes when speaking in English? For example, do native speakers of Japanese make different mistakes than native speakers of Russian when ...
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1answer
75 views

Are there any words that have changed usage/meaning multiple times (multiple semantic shifts) from 1850s to present time

I am interested in semantic shift undergone by words, and I am aware of classic examples like 'gay', which has shifted in meaning since the 1900s. However, are there any words that have actually ...
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39 views

What is it about language that causes people to cloud their judgement of a thing with society definitions for things? [closed]

A few examples of this are: multi-meter oscillo-scope car length When I speak to people I know that I'm using the right definitions for words, but many people think they're the wrong word. Why do ...
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1answer
110 views

Ergative Verbs and some discussion about them

I know what ergative verb is - Consider the following sentences - I opened the door. The door was opened (by me). The door opened. The verb open is a transitive verb in sentence #1, ...
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1answer
68 views

Which English phonemes can be distinguished via lip-reading?

Is there a comprehensive list about which phonemes in the English language can be distinguished via lip-reading and which can't?
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2answers
123 views

“Those who” vs “Them who”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but as I haven't received any answer from grammatical point of view, I am asking the same question here. Please help. I pity those who lost their money in ...
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1answer
47 views

What's a good minimal pair to highlight interrogative prosody in English?

I want to show my students how intonation contours in Praat can help identify English interrogatives. An obvious example is "He's coming." vs "He's coming?" -- but perhaps those of you more familiar ...
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1answer
80 views

Term: Prejudicial Inability to Understand

Is there a term for, supposed, inability to understand someone due to racial prejudice? For example many people think foreigners can't speak their language, so when a foreigner does speak their ...
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1answer
94 views

What name should be given to this allophone of /tʃ/?

I am a native English speaker, but when I make the sound which should be /tʃ/, I have been told that I begin it by placing the tip of my tongue briefly between my teeth, as if I was going to start a ...
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2answers
68 views

IPA for English: British or US standard?

I often see IPA representations of words (e.g in Wikipedia) that render the American accent of English (instead of British). Is there any agreement on which English accent IPA should render or does it ...
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2answers
103 views

Are languages that can derive more meaning from context more advanced?

In English, the meaning of pronouns (the antecedents) are understood from context. And, this allows for a more abbreviated and fluid means to communicate. However, even when the antecedents are ...
2
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2answers
129 views

“He left the room angry” Is this a resultative adjunct?

He entered the room drunk. He left the room angry. I have heard that both drunk and angry are the examples of what is called resultative adjuncts. Is this correct? What does the term mean?
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68 views

determine if noun is person or person's name

How can I determine if a noun is the name of a person based on other words in the sentence? For example, I was able to determine that a noun is a place by it following ' to ' or ' from '. Are there ...
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4answers
103 views

Why might English be considered easy to learn and why might it be considered difficult?

I have heard claims of English being both very easy and very difficult to learn for L2 learners (in adulthood). Is it that the English writing system is difficult to learn while the language itself ...
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0answers
63 views

Is there any corpus for idioms?

I'm looking for a corpus for English (American, GB, Australian) idioms. Preferably created manually, because I already have two, but they are rather small and were built semi-automatically.
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2answers
76 views

Hebrew to English connection through linguistics?

On the website, "Edenics- Where Language Began" it is mentioned that the Hebrew word 'zinoot'(fornication) a Zayin-mem word have influenced the English sin". Since the z and the s are closely ...
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1answer
115 views

Noise Removal -Text classification

I am doing a text classification task. My text is questions and answers in a community question answering website. I want to extract tags from the title , existing tags, and BODY of the questions and ...
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2answers
268 views

need to understand infinitive

What is the easiest way to understand what an infinitive is? How do I know which verb in which sentence is an infinitive? For example, let us take this website: Infinitive This is the example I am ...
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0answers
38 views

Is “Proper English” a Classist Construct? [duplicate]

In a recent item largely addressing using dialect in writing, author Elizabeth Bear asserted the following: ...standard or "proper" English is a social construct intended as a measure of class ...
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1answer
174 views

Why is it correct to say “Honey, I'm home”, but “Miel, soy casa” is not?

Inspired by the picture below (thanks to brainlesstaless), when I got home I called to my wife: "Miel, soy casa". After a short pause, she started laughing. I know in Spanish this sentence makes no ...
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2answers
262 views

Correct syllabification in (American) English

I need to figure out what the proper syllabification of words in American English is and why. PLEASE NOTE: I am interested in syllabification from a phonetic point of view, not in terms of ...
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1answer
94 views

Etymology: Arabic falaha, German pflügen, English to plough

Could there be some connection between Arabic falaha meaning to till the soil and German pflügen, Pflug or English plough, to plough?
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9answers
324 views

Why are there inflections?

I'm from a Chinese background. I wonder why there are inflections in many languages, as compared with no inflections in Chinese. I personally suppose that a language should originate simple and easy ...
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1answer
125 views

How to determine if a word is a verb besides looking in a list of verbs?

I'm building a PoS tagger and I was wondering if there is a way to determine if a word is a verb other than looking in a list of verbs. What i'm doing is marking all words as nouns, then if it ends ...
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2answers
187 views

Am I a native English speaker? (born I Hungary, lived in US from age 3)

I'm not sure if I'm going to get any answers, but I am trying to find out whether I can qualify as a native english speaker. Here's my story: born in Hungary moved to US at age 3 spoke Hungarian ...
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0answers
62 views

Questions about transitive alternation

The following data show that the prefix re- can be attached only to transitive verbs. List A List B reblacken *rego resoften *recry reharden *resleep The verbs of List A whose ...
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0answers
95 views

The infamous green squiggly line on Microsoft Word

I'm in the progress of writing an essay at current. I have articulated the following sentence onto the document and the omniscient Microsoft Word has deemed it as "Fragment (consider revising)". ...
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1answer
97 views

Language transfer for second language learners (French-English)

How does language transfer occur from French to English within native french speakers' mind? Can we observe this phenomenon ?
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1answer
72 views

How are phrases such as “How beautiful” usually analyzed?

In English (and I believe in other languages, though I'm not certain), question words like "how" and "what" can be used as intensifiers, in phrases like How beautiful or What splendor or ...
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1answer
77 views

recent topics in linguistics [closed]

what are the recent controversial issues in - pragmatics. -socio-linguistics. that are receiving the experts' attention ?
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1answer
152 views

How does Morphology apply to reading and teaching English Language Learners how to read?

I am not sure if I am answering the question correctly can anyone please comment. Morphology is the study of words. It deals with understanding of word parts (morphemes). To facilitate student’s ...
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3answers
313 views

Why did English lose cases whilsts German retained them?

Why (or more specifically what caused) did English lose cases whilsts they were retained in German. I am asking this question as I have recently been reading into the various Germanic languages and it ...
3
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2answers
144 views

Why does English have progressive aspect but German does not?

In english there are two ways to express a present action: I go I am going However, In German there is really only one way to express a present action: Ich gehe If English is a ...
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0answers
85 views

How do homonyms impact English Language Learners comprehension?

I understand that homonyms are words that sound alike but have different meanings. They may or may not be spelled the same. For example, the word fair is spelled and pronounced the same for three ...
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0answers
80 views

Common misspellings: Loosing losing [closed]

Anecdotally, it seems like one of the more common misspellings on the net (besides then/than, your/you're, etc.), particularly in documents where everything else is spelled correctly, is to use ...
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1answer
129 views

Is the schwa nasalized before a nasal?

I know that vowels are nasalized before a nasal in the same syllable in English. I am wondering if this would include the schwa [ə] as well? Example, would the schwa in "restriction [rɪstrɪkʃən]" be ...
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0answers
65 views

Origin and usage of “no-yeah” and “yeah-no”

I'm curious to know if there is any history between the usages of "yeah-no" and "no-yeah" in English, and if the usage of the two terms or an equivalent is used in other languages. Also, is there a ...
4
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3answers
96 views

Contingent grammaticality

(I'm not sure about the title, but it's the best I can come up with). On ELU somebody has asked this question about which form of the verb "to be" to use in the frame She gives a blanket to me ...
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22 views

Recommended prosodic and intonation analysis practical handbooks/guides?

Can anyone recommend me any prosodic or intonation analysis handbooks for Present Day (British) English (PDE). I have read plenty of Halliday and understand the basic terms and functions of ...
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0answers
31 views

Abbreviation taking the meaning of the whole expression

In English and some other languages (such as Portuguese and possibly Italian), the word "calculus" is actually an abbreviation from "differential and integral calculus" that has taken the meaning of ...
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3answers
110 views

Sentence well-formedness

When compressing a source sentence by removing some of its words, what are the main component besides the verb, subject and negation that one has to keep in order to preserve the grammaticality of a ...
3
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1answer
151 views

Is 'It' anaphoric or cataphoric, and what is its antecedent/postcedent?

Question 1a: What does 'It' refer to in the following sentence: It was clearly in the mood to place acknowledgements at the bottom of questions. The context for the above sentence is provided ...
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113 views

English vs. Esperanto (in grammar, vocabulary, semantics)

I know Esperanto is constructed on the basis of Romance languages; but what are the main differences and similarities between English and Esperanto? Especially from the following aspects: grammar ...
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2answers
87 views

Establishing the most common “semantic units” in a corpus

I have a corpus concerning spoken English, where the most common words include: you, the, i, to, a. However, I'm not only interested in words but also groups of consecutive words where the meaning is ...
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81 views

Is there any borrowing between the word “Park” and the Arabic word “Bark”?

The Arabic word "Bark" comes from the root B-R-K ب ر ك which means stopping, and staying still, and all of its words branches from it. The word "Bark" بَرْك in particular means herd of camels sitting, ...