Tagged Questions

A Germanic language spoken in, among others, Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

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5
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4answers
1k views

Ei (egg in German) and eye; Auge (eye in German) and egg

Is it known if there was some weird flipping of [Ei (egg in German) and eye] with [Auge(eye in German) and egg] that happened historically or do you think the apparent similarities are coincidence?
0
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0answers
28 views

German sentence corpus with cloze norms

I wish to conduct research on German based on cloze probabilities. Cloze probabilities are not trivial to collect, so I am asking if there exist any publicly available corpora of German sentences with ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Did German or English form of infinitive appear first?

German and English languages have a common root but an innumerable amount of differences. One of them is how infinitive is formed. In English we have to+verb: "to stand" in German we have a verb ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

German/Swedish dictionary to download as a text file

I am looking for a dictionary that I can download as a text file which specifies the grammatical gender of nouns in both languages. Basically, I would like something like: ...
2
votes
2answers
56 views

IPA notation for syllabic [n] after another [n]

Written German has verbs like <können> ‘can’, but some (quick, lazy, …) speakers – myself included – pronounce this word form without any /e/ or schwa sound in the second nucleus. There are still ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Case matching asymmetry in German dislocation

Left- and right-dislocation in German behave differently regarding the case the dislocated expression takes. Left-dislocation seems to be lenient, as it allows the nominative as well as the case the ...
3
votes
3answers
88 views

What is the word class of the first part of a partitive genitive?

I'm trying to determine the part of speech in the following example: German: Mario Götze ist einer der besten Fußballspieler der Welt. (partitive genitive) English: Mario Götze is one of the ...
2
votes
1answer
187 views

Resource for German minimal pairs

I recently asked a general question about minimal pairs and got a link to a website that provides a comprehensive list of English minimal pairs. Is there a similar list for German minimal pairs?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Definite or indefinite adjectives with possessive personal determiners in Germanic?

While both German and Danish have different forms of adjectives in definite and indefinite noun phrases, noun phrases with possessive personal determiners pattern with the indefinite noun phrases in ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

Term for omitted pronouns?

In informal German, e.g. spoken conversation or text chat, it is possible to omit certain personal pronouns and sometimes inflected forms of sein ‘to be’, too (similar to Russian). Ich gehe ...
-1
votes
2answers
143 views

Etymology: Arabic falaha, German pflügen, English to plough

Could there be some connection between Arabic falaha meaning to till the soil and German pflügen, Pflug or English plough, to plough?
0
votes
1answer
60 views

German help regarding the origin of a last name

We are trying to find the origin of our family name. Ending with "AU" I thought it might be maybe of german decent. Our last name is "Arsenau". Any word in german that sounds like "arsen" ? That last ...
5
votes
3answers
449 views

Why did English lose cases whilsts German retained them?

Why (or more specifically what caused) did English lose cases whilsts they were retained in German. I am asking this question as I have recently been reading into the various Germanic languages and it ...
4
votes
4answers
224 views

Why does English have progressive aspect but German does not?

In english there are two ways to express a present action: I go I am going However, In German there is really only one way to express a present action: Ich gehe If English is a ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Tabulated lists of examples

"Everybody [?] knows" that there are these pairs of corresponding words in German and English in which an "f" appears in German where a "p" appears in English: Bischoff, bishop Schiff, ship ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Borrowing from German in American English [closed]

Which words were borrowed from German in American English?
5
votes
2answers
404 views

Influence of Polish and Czech on the phonology of German dialects

German has for more than 1000 years been in contact with West Slavic languages, notably Polish and Czech. This is highly likely to have led to borrowing or interference between these languages, in ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

On an anthropological feature of German etymology (e.g. Pusteblumen)

A curious and nice property of German is that some nouns don't have, say, intrinsic names, but composed (German!) names according to the human use or perception. For instance: Pusteblume ...
2
votes
2answers
302 views

“Maybe” in German (vielleicht)

The word maybe is pretty much a direct translation of "may be" in all languages I know, with or without concatenation. Examples: kanske (Swedish), måske (Danish), peut-être (French), может быть ...
3
votes
1answer
143 views

English an Oral, German a Written Culture?

From my perception (native German, lived in UK) German culture is more focused on the written word and values precision and perfection when expressing yourself. English culture on the contrary ...
7
votes
2answers
320 views

German Place Names ending in -AU

I recently traveled in Bavaria. I was struck by the prevalence of place names ending in -au, like Donau, Passau, Oberammergau, and Dachau... I looked up the dictionary, and found the word aue which ...
7
votes
3answers
116 views

Looking for bi-/tri-lingual dictionaries or corpora

I will be attempting to solve the problem of automatic language identification/detection (and later translation), and I'm in a need of free digital dictionaries or corpora. I'm looking for ...
8
votes
6answers
6k views

Is learning German easier for people who know Sanskrit, and vice versa?

I've heard many times that learning German is easier for those who speak Sanskrit, and vice versa. Is there any linguistic basis for this? What similarities exist between the two languages that may be ...
3
votes
3answers
967 views

German is SOV: should it not have been “Ich ein Berliner bin”?

German is typically described as a Subject-Object-Verb language. For former American President Kennedy's mistake to be grammatical (i.e. without the indefinite article "ein"), why should it not have ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the German “conjunctive” the same as the “subjunctive” of other languages? If so why the different name?

Many languages have a subjunctive mood but German has a conjunctive. However is the German conjunctive just a different name for the same mood? If the two are different what is the difference? If not ...