Variation of pitch when not used to distinguish words.

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5
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1answer
50 views

What's a good minimal pair to highlight interrogative prosody in English?

I want to show my students how intonation contours in Praat can help identify English interrogatives. An obvious example is "He's coming." vs "He's coming?" -- but perhaps those of you more familiar ...
4
votes
1answer
117 views

Are there tonal languages which use a rising intonation for questions?

I know that in the case of Mandarin Chinese questions do not end with any kind of rising tone unless the last morpheme in the sentence happens to have a rising tone. For questions which don't contain ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Recommended prosodic and intonation analysis practical handbooks/guides?

Can anyone recommend me any prosodic or intonation analysis handbooks for Present Day (British) English (PDE). I have read plenty of Halliday and understand the basic terms and functions of ...
4
votes
1answer
456 views

How do sentence intonation and (syllable-based) tone interact in tone languages?

Tone languages use intonation to distinguish words. For example, in Mandarin Chinese mā with a mid tone means mom mǎ with a rising tone means horse Intonation languages do not make such ...
13
votes
3answers
306 views

Did Ancient Greek have a rising intonation for questions?

Unlike English, Ancient (e.g. Attic) Greek does not reorder words to formulate a question. The particle "ἆρα" does modify a statement into a question, but is not always present. In that case, I ...
3
votes
1answer
400 views

Intonation for questions in different languages and child's early language development intonations

Since my 9 months old son started pointing to things and saying 'Ahh?' with a proper question intonation, I was wondering if all other languages have the same intonation for questions as in English ...
4
votes
1answer
211 views

Are there any papers about the calling contour (minor third, vocative chant) in Italian?

As indicated in the answers to "Is it common to use the minor third for calling someone?", "many European languages" use this type of chanted falling contour, but the examples all come from English, ...
9
votes
4answers
591 views

What are the main accents of modern Russian among native speakers?

Before I had heard any spoken, Russian was one of my favorite languages. I used to have fun just reading Russian dictionaries, and I thought I'd soon learn to speak it. But when I tried to find some ...
21
votes
2answers
489 views

Is it common to use the minor third for calling someone?

In German, calling someone's two-syllable name is tied very strongly to the minor third. In languages that like to have a stressed last syllable, I would expect the last syllable to be higher than ...
6
votes
1answer
243 views

What is known about the universal aspects of the relation between intonation and emotion?

Are there language-independent aspects of the expression of emotion by intonation? More specifically, are there established relations between the expression of emotion by linguistic intonation and by ...