Variation of pitch when not used to distinguish words.

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2
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1answer
39 views

How are Tone and Intonation languages different acoustically?

On what aspects Tonal languages differ from Intonation languages when analyzing them acoustically? On intonation and tone: Jones (1960) - "the variations which take place in the pitch of the ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Are there any prosodic characteristics that distinguish speech from song?

I wonder if there are any (even roughly defined) prosodic characteristics or tendencies that can be used to distinguish speech from sound, at least in some cases. Is there any criteria used to ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What is Fall-plus-Rise (phonetics)?

1) Is it a tone? 2) How do you pronounce it? How it would look like in the intonogram? 3) Is it the same thing as Divided (Extended) Fall-Rise? Are there any differences? 4) Is this tone used for a ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

How to save the process of your work in PRAAT?

Is it possible to save the process of your project (not a result of it) in PRAAT programme so that you can change smth later etc and do not do the same things over again?
-1
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0answers
43 views

Is “scandent” - a tone? (phonetics)? [closed]

I have a scandent mark on a word and I should identify a tone of it. Can I say just "scandent" or it should be one of the rising tones (like High Rise etc)?
0
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0answers
25 views

Is it universal among languages to go up with the voice at end of questions? [duplicate]

In the languages I know (German, English, French, Portuguese), you usually go up with the voice at the end of a question. Is this an universal "feature" of languages or are there languages were this ...
3
votes
2answers
143 views

How is IPrA going to change the way we transcribe prosody?

There are some proposals for IPrA (International Prosodic Alphabet, similar to IPA but for prosody). The meeting for IPrA (link to UCLA webpage on the topic) is planning to be held in BU in mid 2016. ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Is there a solution for the ToBI's weakness in showing speech variance?

I'm currently doing a research on the ToBI system (a system for transcribing prosody). The ToBI system is a phonological based system and does not show the variance in speech. for instance an L+H% ...
0
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2answers
39 views

Why are the elements at the ends of these sentences stressed?

Examples: They can conquer who believe they CAN. (auxiliary verb) Yes, it IS. (verb in tag question) He never grew UP. (preposition) I actually got these examples from a book. Thank you!!!
2
votes
0answers
129 views

How to understand the difference between “Strong” & “Weak” Hypotheses in the case of Bolinger/Lieberman's views of Intonation?

1. Non-Whorfian contexts and missing Czech equivalents To begin with, I am not sure if this is the right place to ask a question that may just as well pertain to scientific terminology in general. ...
0
votes
4answers
133 views

Linguistic typology of isochrony and intonation

I don't have much of a background in linguistics, and I can't tell if some of the terms I am seeing are overloaded or unique in meaning. Specifically, I've been told that language timing can be ...
5
votes
1answer
92 views

What's a good minimal pair to highlight interrogative prosody in English?

I want to show my students how intonation contours in Praat can help identify English interrogatives. An obvious example is "He's coming." vs "He's coming?" -- but perhaps those of you more familiar ...
4
votes
1answer
217 views

Are there tonal languages which use a rising intonation for questions?

I know that in the case of Mandarin Chinese questions do not end with any kind of rising tone unless the last morpheme in the sentence happens to have a rising tone. For questions which don't contain ...
5
votes
1answer
924 views

How do sentence intonation and (syllable-based) tone interact in tone languages?

Tone languages use intonation to distinguish words. For example, in Mandarin Chinese mā with a mid tone means mom mǎ with a rising tone means horse Intonation languages do not make such ...
13
votes
3answers
515 views

Did Ancient Greek have a rising intonation for questions?

Unlike English, Ancient (e.g. Attic) Greek does not reorder words to formulate a question. The particle "ἆρα" does modify a statement into a question, but is not always present. In that case, I ...
3
votes
1answer
700 views

Intonation for questions in different languages and child's early language development intonations

Since my 9 months old son started pointing to things and saying 'Ahh?' with a proper question intonation, I was wondering if all other languages have the same intonation for questions as in English ...
5
votes
1answer
236 views

Are there any papers about the calling contour (minor third, vocative chant) in Italian?

As indicated in the answers to "Is it common to use the minor third for calling someone?", "many European languages" use this type of chanted falling contour, but the examples all come from English, ...
9
votes
4answers
1k views

What are the main accents of modern Russian among native speakers?

Before I had heard any spoken, Russian was one of my favorite languages. I used to have fun just reading Russian dictionaries, and I thought I'd soon learn to speak it. But when I tried to find some ...
22
votes
2answers
726 views

Is it common to use the minor third for calling someone?

In German, calling someone's two-syllable name is tied very strongly to the minor third. In languages that like to have a stressed last syllable, I would expect the last syllable to be higher than ...
7
votes
2answers
277 views

What is known about the universal aspects of the relation between intonation and emotion?

Are there language-independent aspects of the expression of emotion by intonation? More specifically, are there established relations between the expression of emotion by linguistic intonation and by ...