The study of the structure and formation of words and their component parts, "morphemes".

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18 views

Are different “aspects” of a Polish verb the same lexeme or different lexemes?

Polish verbs have two "aspects", imperfective and perfective, which means you use a different word depending on whether the activity you're describing is ongoing or habitual, or if it's definite or ...
-1
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0answers
25 views

Can every language express any lexical aspect?

Wikipedia tells about the difference and relation between lexical aspect and grammatical aspect. Whereas the lexical aspect is a specific way to put focus onto how to observe an event on a semantic ...
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1answer
50 views

What is an affix called that is interlocked?

Wikipedia mentions 4 subgroups of affixes: prefix, the affix is in front of the word suffix, the affix is behind the word infix, the affix is within the word circumfix, the afix is separated into ...
6
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1answer
65 views

L1 acquisition of morphology in heavily inflected languages

It is very common to hear two- and three-year-olds in English saying "I falled down," "She gived me it," etc. And the frequency of a verb form is inversely related to the age at which one is likely to ...
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0answers
7 views

Women's clothes or women clothes in a department store? [migrated]

Many native English speakers would say that it is "women's clothes". However, when I asked non-native English speakers, they say that "women clothes" would be preferred by them. In the UK many ...
0
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0answers
54 views

What is the difference between case marking particles and adpositions?

Apparently there is some relevant book which claims, more or less: Case marking particles and adpositions are not identical, one is a morphological, one a syntactic unit. This claim was heard ...
0
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0answers
30 views

How many levels to approach language exist in linguistics?

I know only a few,like semantic level to approach its very meaning, the morphology level to understand how single words are build, syntax level to understand the inner structure of sentences. I ...
3
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1answer
84 views

Order of derivational and inflectional affixes

I saw the following formula on Wikipedia: morpheme + derivational morphemes + desinence (inflectional morphemes) followed immediately by the comment not not necessarily in this order. But all the ...
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2answers
203 views

why do in japanese phonetically and morphologically simple words like ついつい express semantically complex concepts like “unintentionally”?

in order to express an idea like "against one 's better judgement" one would have to use, for instance in English or German more complicated words with respect to their phonetic and morphology: ...
7
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1answer
271 views

Why do neuter nominative and accusative always agree in IE languages?

The question that I have is a simple one. Of every neuter noun, pronoun, or adjective, in any IE language (as far as I know), the nominative and accusative cases agree in all numbers. Why is this? ...
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1answer
95 views

NLP conversion between parts of speech and pertainyms?

I would like to write a program that can automatically group e.g. 'happiness', 'happily', 'happy' into 'happy': What do I need to read to get a handle on this subject? What is it called? What is the ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Is there an estimate for the typical number of morphemes in natural language?

Martinet's "double articulation of language": With phonemes we build morphemes, and with morphemes, words. I'd like to get a sense of how productive are these combinations: With only a few phonemes ...
2
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1answer
110 views

Can a language have both nominative/accusative and ergative/absolutive syntactic systems in its syntactic structure?

These examples are from Kui, a Trans New Guinean language spoken on Alor island, Indonesia. (1) nya yai umasingin u=ga=sam u=ga=bur=i. 1pl.Sub v. n. ...
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2answers
113 views

Word elements relating to ancient deities [closed]

Are there word elements, including suffixes, from Old English or other languages that have been linked to their ancient deities and the people that served them, to which these elements are still in ...
2
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1answer
118 views

Nouns and Interrogative Complements

In English, there are many different verbs which can combine with clausal complements. These verbs can be further sub-categorised as to whether they embed a propositional that-clause, or an embedded ...
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1answer
50 views

Looking for a Morphology Database

This is my first StackExchange post, so please let me know if I need to add additional information. I am looking for a comprehensive database that has words broken down by their morphology. For ...
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0answers
37 views

What's the term for N-PP expressions such as “lady-in-waiting”?

Does anyone know or can suggest a term for the following expressions: lady-in-waiting brother-in-law sergent-at-arms bride-to-be etc. Expressions like those above are special for (at ...
2
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3answers
360 views

The suffix -er in English: Why is this derivational?

A typical charactersitic of inflectional suffixes is that they are productive (can occur on many words) and obligatory (are required by virtue of certain grammatical constraints). Simplistic though ...
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1answer
49 views

Is this nominal suffix more inflectional or derivational?

So, I'm working on this conlang as part of my work and the deliverable is a simple grammar. To facilitate reference, I've divided up the suffixes between inflectional and derivational forms. But of ...
2
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1answer
112 views

What sort of morpheme is this suffix meaning ‘about'?

Some background: This is a conlang that I'm developing as part of my job. It's a difficult task, but I want to make it as realistic as possible. I have to make a detailed grammar so that other ...
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0answers
93 views

What to call the content of pronouns

English and most Indo-European languages have gender-based pronouns, it can be seen he (3SG: +masculine) or she (3SG: +feminine) in English. Some other languages do not have gender-based pronouns but ...
4
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1answer
133 views

Is there any fusional language where pronouns and nouns share the same declension?

Some analytic languages sometimes use the same prepositions for nouns and pronouns,e.g. 'I'm proud OF him' vs. 'I'm proud OF his book'. Agglutinative languages may use the same affix for nouns and ...
2
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1answer
75 views

Evidentiality: Aspect or Modality?

I was curious about evidentiality. In Turkish, evidentiality can be seen as {-mIş} suffix, but English does not have any suffix to express. Take a look at this sentence: Babası ona yeni ayakkabı ...
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1answer
163 views

Is it possible for a language to have both left-headed and right-headed compounds?

Is it possible for a language to have both left-headed and right-headed compounds? And can one please explain this with examples and with the use of linguistic reasoning based on morphology?
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1answer
54 views

Anomalous forms of Hebrew roots with final y

Hebrew triliteral roots whose final consonant is y have an anomalous conjugation in most templates. Why is this? Specifically: It is only in the passive participle template CaCuC, as far as I can ...
4
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98 views

What is known or believed about the origin of Semitic-type root-and-template morphology?

How does nonconcatenative morphology of the Semitic type (consonantal roots, vocalic templates + affixes) arise diachronically? It's pretty easy to see how a nonconcatenative inflectional system ...
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2answers
99 views

Plural formation in Bulgarian

How could you analyze the formation of the plural below? Singular - Plural teatər - teatri - theater bobər - bobri - beaver pesen - pesni - song psalom - psalmi - psalm bancik - bancigi - ...
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3answers
128 views

non-concatenative morphology in written arabic?

How could you explain or analyze these written Arabic from the non-concatenative morphology point of view? These verbs are derived from nouns. bakkala (to buckle) bukla (buckle) tilifu:n ...
6
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3answers
174 views

Across agglutinative languages are there tendencies for morphemes to occur in certain orders?

In agglutinative languages there are normally roots for nouns and/or verbs that can have multiple morphemes attached as affixes, following certain rules, to add information such as tense, aspect, ...
5
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4answers
177 views

Is feminine ending in -a a native feature of Semitic languages?

It seems to me that many Arabic female names are ending in -a: Fatima, Yamina, Aisha, Aziza. Is this a modern innovation imported from Indo-European languages or a native feature? Also I wonder about ...
1
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1answer
369 views

How does Morphology apply to reading and teaching English Language Learners how to read?

I am not sure if I am answering the question correctly can anyone please comment. Morphology is the study of words. It deals with understanding of word parts (morphemes). To facilitate student’s ...
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1answer
83 views

Does the classification of languages “agglutinating” concern itself with inflectional morphology, derivational morphology, or both?

I had always thought that the terms "agglutinative" and "agglutination" referred to the typology of the inflection in a language. But on another question here there seem to be a number of comments ...
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1answer
62 views

Do any natural languages have phrase-coordinators that surround their coordinands?

For those who came in late, there are such things as discontinuous morphemes, i.e. single morphemes that are interrupted by other morphemes. Note this example from this SIL link: ...
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113 views

Across languages that have adjectives, what are the most common grammatical inflections for adjectives?

Not all languages have adjectives; some use adjectival nouns ("red.one" instead of "red") and/or stative verbs ("be.red" instead of "red"). Among languages that have adjectives, not all allow ...
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1answer
148 views

What's the difference between suppletion and irregular inflection?

I've been using the two terms interchangeably. One of my assignments is asking me to identify cases of both suppletion and irregular inflection. I've been going over course notes/google to no ...
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70 views

What morphosyntactic features are associated with VSO?

In an answer to another question, librik cited Orin Gensler's observation that Insular Celtic and Semitic share a surprisingly large feature complex. This makes it hard for a layman with ready access ...
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77 views

What is the term for a noun that stands for more than one portion of an uncountable referent?

A noun that refers to one countable thing is singular. A noun that stands for one countable portion, part, or unit of some non-countable thing is singulative. See ...
2
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1answer
88 views

Is the case described below hypothetical or does it occur in natural languages?

Suppose that you have a language, let's say it's SVO, has a clause pattern in which the subject typically stands for an agent or experiencer and the object typically stands for a patient or stimulus, ...
4
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2answers
191 views

Is there any difference between imperfect and imperfective aspect?

For those who came in late, "perfect" and "perfective" aspects are not the same. Perfect aspect pertains to actions that have been completed at the time referenced by the tense. So English past ...
2
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2answers
215 views

Accusative vs Ergative

In terms of syntactic structure, from the below grammar can we conclude that English is accusative language, not ergative. S --> NP VP VPtv --> Vtv NP VPiv --> Viv By intuition, I ...
4
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0answers
68 views

Are there any natural languages with exclusively asyndetic coordination?

Are there any languages with exclusively asyndetic coordination, i.e. in which constituents are coordinated solely by juxtaposition, with disjunctive (or) or adversative (but) meaninigs communicated ...
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53 views

How is disjunction of noun phrases expressed in languages that coordinate noun phrases by using pronouns?

According to the paper presented at http://depts.washington.edu/uwcl/matrix/sfd/Drellishak%20-%20MA%20Thesis.pdf, two of the most common strategies for coordinating pronouns are a) the use of a ...
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1answer
66 views

Have agglutinative languages productive morphology?

In non-agglutinative languages we have certain word classes that would be considered productive, and we have word classes that wouldn't. Morphological inflection, on the other hand, is from my ...
3
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2answers
133 views

Does the neologism “knowlet” have correct morphology in English?

I'm about creating a new word to denote small pieces of knowledge and understanding, like truthful sentences (eagles are birds), or informative news about technology (Google Chrome's market share ...
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107 views

Linguistics resources for beginners [closed]

I'm currently reading Jackendoff's Foundations of language and I've realised that my knowledge of syntax, morphology and phonology isn't as strong as I'd like it to be. I'm coming from a psych ...
0
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1answer
129 views

The manifestation of creativity in written language

I am working on a project where the aim is to create a dictionary of creativity terms. I am a scholar of social psychology and marketing, and the aim the project is to be able to track ideas and ...
2
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1answer
135 views

Does Euro-English exist?

There is debate on the existence of this variety within the expanding circle, I think it exists in as much as we can categorise other varieties (i.e. Singlish falls under the 'Asian-English' label). ...
3
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2answers
127 views

To what extent is a language's morphology tied to orthography, and why do we not consider orthography when doing morphological analysis?

Linguistics classes seem to be mostly concerned with analyzing language in its spoken form. Written language is seen as almost "parasitic" to spoken language. A language's orthography generally gives ...
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144 views

What are the advantages of using a morpheme-based dictionary in a speech recognition system?

What are the advantages of using a morphologically-based / lemma-based dictionary in a speech recognition system as opposed to a dictionary of 'Orthography' + 'transcription' or other types (which I ...
6
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1answer
139 views

Languages with subordinate imperatives?

English does not allow an imperative to be used in a subordinate clause: Eat that pizza! *There's a pizza on the table, which eat! (="which I order you to eat") *I told you eat that pizza! (A ...