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8
votes
1answer
108 views

Why is Mikołaj the Polish reflex of Nicholas?

The Polish name Mikołaj is held to correspond to the Nicholas family of given names, as evidenced by the Russified name of Mikołaj Kruszewski. As this is an odd sound change, my question is why? My ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

Is there a term for names with the “X the Y” construction? [closed]

For example, "Ivan the Terrible" or "Conan the Barbarian".
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Using the alternatives for copyrighted zero derivation words (e.g. “LEGO”, “Xerox” [closed]

We have seen how copyright infringement goes into zero derivation English words such as a Xerox clone or He was Googling it or even A lego like construction. (e.g. ...
3
votes
0answers
56 views

Difficulty in learning names of people in second language

The area I live in has a very large population of Chinese people. I also speak fluent Chinese as a second language (10+ years learning and also speak at home). For various reasons I regularly meet new ...
7
votes
1answer
384 views

Morphology of proper names

I'm wondering if there are any general morphological properties of proper names. If a word is used as a name, it will be constrained by whatever syntactic constraints that language uses from proper ...
0
votes
1answer
176 views

What is the origin of the name “Condoleezza”?

I wonder whether the original form of this name should be "Condolencia"? The name sounds very funny for a Russian ear, because it means "condom licker" in Russian.
3
votes
3answers
348 views

Why do Richard and Robert become Dick and Bob?

Is there a phonological reason for this change? I know there are names where, when clipped, there is /r/ in coda position. For example: Derek > Der Sarah > Sar Harold > Har So in non-rhotic ...
6
votes
2answers
247 views

Was there a Greek or Latin name spelled “Jesus” or similarly before the advent of Christianity?

Many of the originally Barbarian names in history were Christianized. Many Christian saints with Slavic/Germanic names were given similar-sounding Greek and Latin names. In this way "Kuzma" ...
5
votes
1answer
887 views

Why do we call some countries a different name than the people of that country?

For example, in English we say Germany, Japan, and China but they say Deutschland, Nihon, and Zhongguo respectively. If we change the names because they are difficult to say or spell outside of their ...
3
votes
1answer
119 views

Correct Alexamenos Graffito Translation

I am researching the "Alexamenos Graffito" from Rome and the various opinions of what the correct translation of the Greek inscription should be. I know some believe it is "Alexamenos worships (his) ...
18
votes
4answers
694 views

Are there any languages or cultures that have genderless given names?

In the U.S. where I live it is possible to be right almost all of the time when guessing the sex of a person from his or her given name: Ronald, George (Sand and Elliot notwithstanding), William, ...
8
votes
1answer
272 views

How to identify character names in a body of text?

I'm trying to research methods of identifying or pattern matching names of characters in a novel or a general body of text, but so far my search has been unsuccessful, since "character" refers to ...
3
votes
3answers
542 views

Gender-based name endings: Are they common?

For instance, if an English name ends in -a, it's likely female. But English has no grammatical gender, and there is no general requirement that nouns in -a refer to women. It seems like in English ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Are Ivar and Álvaro etymologically the same?

I have heard that the Spanish name Álvaro is of Germanic origin. So I began wondering where it might be preserved in the Germanic languages. After some thought I came up with the Scandinavian name ...
22
votes
10answers
1k views

Articles before the name of a person

In the question “La” or “le” before a person's name? on the French SE site, the asker refers to the phenomenon that in some rural/dialect settings the first name of a person is preceded by the ...
17
votes
4answers
123 views

Why was מֹשֶׁה‎ transliterated as [moʊzɨz]?

How did the name "מֹשֶׁה‎" come to be transliterated with a [z] at the end? The OED entry notes that "Moses" derives from Biblical Hebrew "Mōšeh" and that the earliest attestations with a strident ...