Tagged Questions

A category of word which typically denotes an entity of some kind.

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1answer
54 views

Is pronoun a subset of nouns when referring to parts of speech?

To be frank, I am very unsure about this, but having two sets and not knowing how they relate, there are four possibilities so far: nouns and pronouns are own sets without any connection between ...
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3answers
108 views

Given a verb get a noun that corresponds to subject or object

I have verbs and I would like to find their corresponding noun for either subject or object. e.g. run:subject -> runner kill:subject -> killer kill:object -> dead I also would have groups of them ...
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0answers
127 views

Are there other words that behave like “weather” in English?

I have been looking at how nouns behave with determiners and plurals and such. So things like mass, count, and collective nouns. One oddball that I have found is "weather", and I am wondering if there ...
2
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3answers
282 views

The suffix -er in English: Why is this derivational?

A typical charactersitic of inflectional suffixes is that they are productive (can occur on many words) and obligatory (are required by virtue of certain grammatical constraints). Simplistic though ...
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1answer
45 views

Is this nominal suffix more inflectional or derivational?

So, I'm working on this conlang as part of my work and the deliverable is a simple grammar. To facilitate reference, I've divided up the suffixes between inflectional and derivational forms. But of ...
2
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1answer
107 views

What sort of morpheme is this suffix meaning ‘about'?

Some background: This is a conlang that I'm developing as part of my job. It's a difficult task, but I want to make it as realistic as possible. I have to make a detailed grammar so that other ...
3
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2answers
141 views

What are the necessary and sufficient characteristics of a word to be considered as nominal?

Clearly there are morphological "tendencies" (case inflection, no TAM marking) -- but what about the semantic or syntactic characteristics (even if they are just tendencies and not universal)? I ...
0
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1answer
73 views

determine if noun is person or person's name

How can I determine if a noun is the name of a person based on other words in the sentence? For example, I was able to determine that a noun is a place by it following ' to ' or ' from '. Are there ...
2
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1answer
76 views

NPs as adverbials; how to parse them?

NPs can function as adverbials as in the following sentences: I ran a mile. I am 5 feet tall. One way to confirm this is by substituting the NPs with adverbs, e.g. "I ran fast" and "I am very ...
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1answer
86 views

Is it [Dr. [No]] or [[Dr.] No], or something else?

The question focuses on how we should structure expressions with a form of address, such as Mr., Frau, etc., or a title, such as Dr., Prof., etc., and a proper name, such as Smith, Yamada, etc. In ...
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3answers
124 views

non-concatenative morphology in written arabic?

How could you explain or analyze these written Arabic from the non-concatenative morphology point of view? These verbs are derived from nouns. bakkala (to buckle) bukla (buckle) tilifu:n ...
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3answers
400 views

Why did English lose cases whilsts German retained them?

Why (or more specifically what caused) did English lose cases whilsts they were retained in German. I am asking this question as I have recently been reading into the various Germanic languages and it ...
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0answers
54 views

Which plural form to use when unknown quantity

I'm not super into linguistics so sorry I won't be using the correct terms here. I also only speak English (though I know tiny bits of a few languages). Also sorry if this is a duplicate, I found it ...
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1answer
88 views

Explain الموقع فايلات اكسيل noun phrase in Arabic

I have the following Arabic sentence and I am interested in the last three words which create a noun phrase. This np is translated as "Site Vaalat Excel" by google, which does not tell me much. ...
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3answers
496 views

What's the term for a word that can be read both as a noun and an adjective depending on where it is used?

Example: headstrong As a noun: The headstrong don't easily give up. As an adjective: The headstrong youth.
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5answers
349 views

Can one noun phrase follow another in English?

Is there a syntactically valid situation when 2 noun phrases are next to each other in English within the same sentence? I am building a bottom-up parser for English. I need to know if [NP][NP] ...
0
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1answer
164 views

Importance of Genders in English Nouns

I am looking at teaching a computer about grammar which could turn into teaching it sentence analysis and eventually how to formulate a response. This is the baby steps. I am defining a noun. So far ...
0
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1answer
73 views

Are there conditions under which Georgian nouns omit the “-ი” case ending?

In Georgian most nouns in the nominative case end with "-ი" (-i), most other nouns end in another vowel. In cases other than the nominative this ending may be replaced with a different ending but the ...
3
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0answers
55 views

What is “contacting case”?

According to Wikipedia, the Bats language of Eastern Georgia has a case called "contacting", but no description is offered as to its function. I checked the Russian and Georgian versions of the page ...
3
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2answers
1k views

What are the constituent morphemes in 'preposition'?

The word preposition. I am trying to break down a series of words into their constituent morphemes and am having trouble with the word 'preposition'. I can obviously see that the 'pre-' is a morpheme ...
0
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0answers
67 views

Is there any universal semantic coding for noun cases similar to verb aspectology?

I am aware of the argument/actant theories, but perhaps there is something like universal semantical coding for the nouns as well. For Argument concepts,you can see the relevant Wikipedia page for ...
3
votes
2answers
528 views

Affix that makes nouns into verbs and verbs into nouns?

I have a friend studying a language from the pacific islands, and she found an affix that when added to a noun makes a verb and when added to a verb makes a noun. What would you call such a thing, and ...
6
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2answers
178 views

Is there are strong case for the existence of languages that lack a clear morpho-syntactic distinction between nouns and verbs?

Is there a strong case for the existence of languages that lack a clear morpho-syntactic distinction between nouns and verbs? If so, what would be an example of a phrase structure for a uniclausal ...
2
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2answers
251 views

Are there agglutinative languages without a propensity for long compound nouns?

I've noticed a propensity for agglutinating languages to also permit quite long compound nouns. Finnish, Turkish and Hungarian certainly have them and I've been finding a few now that I'm trying to ...
10
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4answers
668 views

How are proper nouns distinguished from other nouns in linguistics (not in orthography)?

When you ask most people the difference between common nouns and proper nouns they mostly can only tell you that proper nouns start with a capital letter. But this has problems: Capital letters and ...
10
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2answers
428 views

What determines how noun compounds are formed in a language?

In English and other Germanic languages, noun compounds are formed simply by “appending” the nouns in a certain order. For example, phrases like this are very common: electricity price ...
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6answers
3k views

What's the global difference between nouns and verbs?

Is there a way to distinguish nouns and verbs that applies to all languages? This problem has been occupying my mind for some time now. I'm not quite sure how to approach this question, so I'll just ...
11
votes
7answers
457 views

“Overabundant nouns” in Italian: do they exist in other languages?

Under my answer to that question, I talked about a category of nouns that exist in Italian. The italian name is "Nomi sovrabbondanti" or "sostantivi sovrabbondanti", the meaning is roughly ...
13
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8answers
758 views

Is the countable vs mass noun distinction common outside English?

English makes a difference between count nouns (also known as countable nouns) and mass nouns (also known as uncountable nouns). Count noun: One cat, two cats, few cats. Mass noun: Some information, ...