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6
votes
0answers
230 views

Latin, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and French number words from eleven to nineteen - history of a bizarre, inconsistent construction

Following Sklivvz's advice, I propose here a question I made in Italian Language. Because I am not sure how I should do this, I will just copy/paste the whole lot. Let's count in Latin from one to ...
3
votes
0answers
108 views

Words for fractions

While in English we have a "quarter" and a " half" as two words which denote fractions, in Hindi we have separate words for half ('Aadha'), Quarter ('Sava'), three-quarters ('Pauna'), One and a half ...
1
vote
0answers
128 views

When are numbers nouns?

In my native language, Portuguese, numbers have officially been in various classes, from adjectives and nouns to "quantifiers" and determiners. I'm thinking that perhaps we can't group them all, ...
10
votes
1answer
411 views

Why do different languages have different amounts of unique words for numbers between 10 and 20?

I've read a similar question here which mainly dealt with why English only has eleven and twelve as unique words with some interesting ideas. But my question is why do different languages have ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

How could complex numerical interrelationships arise naturally in a language? [closed]

In Hebrew and possibly other abjads, there is a concept called "gematria", which is, in short, that each letter has a numerical value proceeding linearly through the alphabet, such that א equals 1, ב ...
-2
votes
1answer
70 views

Is it *incorrect* to use single digit numerals? [closed]

I had an argument with someone recently and figured I should find out, so I went on a research spree and could not find any authoritative answers on the subject. I am sure there are many disputes ...
2
votes
0answers
124 views

Pahlavi and Parthian numerals

Does any body know how following numeral were used and provide some example? (at least one one them, they are related languages) (source of images is Unicode characters maps)
6
votes
3answers
177 views

Word for eighteen expressed as Twenty Minus Two

Other than Latin, are there any languages that have a word for the number 18 that means twenty minus two? A quick glance at some of the numeral systems of languages in the Indo-European reveal that ...
10
votes
4answers
461 views

Which modern, spoken languages do not imply the decimal number system?

Rationale: While writing a document about foundations of computer science and describing that a number is a sequence of digits, I was wondering about our relation to the decimal system. In English ...
9
votes
1answer
378 views

French Numbering System - Eighty to Ninety-Nine

Why does French use the format "4 x 20 + n" (n = 0 to 19) for numbers from eighty to ninety-nine?
14
votes
1answer
378 views

What is the relationship between the PIE roots *dekṃ and *kṃtóm?

It seems that there is a consensus that the PIE roots for ten and hundred are, respectively, *deḱṃ and *ḱṃtóm. There also seems to be a consensus that *ḱṃtóm is a shortened version of *deḱṃtóm. These ...
6
votes
2answers
163 views

Is there a term in linguistics for underdeveloped number systems?

I had trouble phrasing a recent question because I couldn't find simple wording to convey the difference between languages like English where all kinds of numbers are expressible, such as "nineteen ...
5
votes
2answers
250 views

Are there languages with indefinite articles but for which the word for “one” is not related etymologically to any of the indefinite articles?

This is part of a set of three related questions but note they are each specific and distinct, they are not duplicates. In all the languages I'm familiar with that have an indefinite article, the ...
4
votes
2answers
266 views

Are there languages which lack a full number system but which have an indefinite article?

Most languages have a fully developed concept of numbers but many do not, for instance most Australian Aboriginal languages lack numbers and counting beyond a few such as 1, 2, and 3. Many languages ...
8
votes
2answers
151 views

How do linguists determine whether a language has an indefinite article?

Given: For those languages which have it, the indefinite article mostly if not always is derived from the numeral for "one". Most languages have numbers but many lack articles. How do linguists ...