A coarticulation involving the segmental assimilation of palatal approximants

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
0answers
73 views

Palatalization in English words like street, storm, etc [closed]

More and more people on television are pronouncing street as "shtreet" and storm as "shtorm", replacing the initial /s/ with /ʃ/. Where and when did this start in mainstream America?
9
votes
4answers
745 views

Why are /t/ and /d/ sometimes affricated before /ɹ/ in English?

I saw a post on ELU about a more general question, Softened pronunciation of consonants, such as “t” or “s” followed by “y”. The question was answered in regard to palatalization, especially for ...
11
votes
2answers
397 views

In Japanese, why do certain consonants change depending on the vowel?

I was wondering why in Japanese, certain consonants change depending on the vowel. For example: Consonants that do not change: ka / ki / ku / ke / ko na / ni / nu / ne / no Consonants that do ...
7
votes
4answers
256 views

What is the name of the phoneme produced in an upper-class Briton's pronunciation of the word “Duke”? What's different in the articulation?

This question has been copied directly from English Language & Usage where it received plenty of interest but the answers had lots of flaws and no resolutions was reached. It was originally asked ...
12
votes
2answers
800 views

Is there a difference between /ɕ/ and /sʲ/?

Are /ɕ/ and /ʑ/ simply shorthand for /sʲ/ and /zʲ/ as with many of the possible diacritic combinations in IPA or are they different sounds? If they are the same, is there any good reason to use one ...