The traditional set of eight word classes: Noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, pronoun, and interjection.

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129 views

What part of speech is “as their native”?

In the sentence: The number of people who speak English as their native language will decline. what part of speech is as their native?
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1answer
59 views

Can “to” ever be a Prep or a Particle before “be”

Can “to” ever be a Prep or a Particle before “be”? If so can anyone think of an example?
5
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1answer
86 views

What part of speech is “quiet” in “And quiet flows the Don”? [closed]

The Mikhail Sholokov novel "Тихий Дон" (Quiet Don) is translated "And quiet flows the Don". In this title, is the word "quiet" an adjective or adverb? If it's an adverb modifying the verb "flows", ...
4
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1answer
67 views

Parts-of-speech tagging and finding relevant phrases in documents

I've got a corpus of half a million text documents. I'd like to identify phrases in each document that are the most descriptive with which to build tag clouds. Let's say that I identify the most ...
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4answers
79 views

Are modal verbs lexical or grammatical categories?

Are modal verbs, such as must and can, considered lexical or grammatical categories?
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2answers
67 views

The Correct Research Methodology To Substantiate If an Expression is an Idiom?

Related: - Does linguistics have a concept of "set phrase" with a meaning differing from "idiom"? - In the Gospels, Can “Day of:” the Passover - be Interpreted Idiomatically? 1....
4
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3answers
73 views

Can training a Part-of-Speech tagger and parser at the same time improve parsing results?

I was wondering if training both a POS tagger and a parser (be it constituency or dependency) at the same time improve the results of parsing in a deep architecture since deep learning can take ...
1
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1answer
52 views

How do distinctive features work?

I'm currently working my way through a book on syntax by Andrew Carnie, and I've come up against something that isn't entirely clear to me. In a chapter about syntactic categories, Carnie writes: ...
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2answers
97 views

What's the term for the use of “this” in “there's this guy called John, who…”?

What's the term for the use of "this" in "there's this guy called John, who..."? Here, the "this" is used like an "a", not literally "this". I'm not sure if there's a term for this.
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3answers
162 views

Can syntax be part of semantics?

Is it possible to consider a POS category of a word as semantic aspect? Assume we have unknown word. But when we know part-of-speech it can give us a hint about semantic meaning. Is that right?
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62 views

References and sources to help me explain the semantics of the word 'over'

So I'm doing an assignment on the semantics of the word 'over'. Everyone in our semantics class was asked by the lecturer to pick a piece of paper out of a hat, he then said that we were required to ...
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0answers
13 views

Is there a name for forms like “A and associates”, “B and company”, “C and friends”?

Forms like "A and associates", "B and company", "C and friends" appear very frequently in company names. Is there a name for this form.
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240 views

Does adding the suffix -ly to a noun or an adjective provide morphological evidence for word class?

For example, adding -ly to quick to make quickly. Or adding -ly to gentleman to make gentlemanly.
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1answer
63 views

How is the 'to' in English infinitive forms called formally?

If I have a construction using an infinitive form such as in: "I want to go" or "What is to be thought of that?" What is the formal name for the part of speech that 'to' represents? 'To' is part of ...
2
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0answers
134 views

How to extract Subject, Object, Verb through a parser

For my project, I need to extract Subject, Object and Verb from the sentence. I have read that, LFG F structure is what I need. I am using Stanford NLP package. I couldnt find out how to do that in ...
1
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1answer
67 views

Classification of verbs by meaning?

I'd like to ask whether someone has ever tried to classify verbs (and other parts of speech) in a relatively small number of semantic groups /not necessarily disjoint/ and if yes, what groups they ...
4
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2answers
97 views

Can one word be classified as two different word classes?

Over at German Language Stack Exchange, the question was asked what the structure of the sentence Ihr Antrag ist abgelehnt. is, and what the word abgelehnt can be classified as. Traditional ...
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2answers
115 views

What is the name of this class of grammatical modifiers?

In French (and many other languages), adjectives and pronouns have different classes, e.g.: Adjectives demonstrative indefinite interrogative numerical possessive Pronouns demonstrative ...
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2answers
99 views

Do we have a taxonomy other than part of speech?

I'm trying to create an educational system, and I would like to have more taxonomies than a simple part of speech. For example, I would like to be able to categorize words into: Tree => object ...
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0answers
34 views

Slot filling corpora

I was wondering if anyone knows of slot filling corpora such as ATIS. I tried finding ATIS but since I am not a member of LDC I couldnt get access to it. Do you know of any place where I can find a ...
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0answers
44 views

How does PIE *i- relate to other different parts of speech?

i- [=]  Pronominal stem. 2. YON [adj, pron] from Old English geon, that, from Germanic * *jaino‑, jeno‑. a. YOND [adv, prep], YONDER [adv], from Old English geond, as far as, yonder, from ...
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1answer
67 views

If two verbs are in a row, is the first always an Auxiliary? [closed]

Consider the sentence: He has gone. This is one of the example auxiliary verb sentences from: "Radford, A. English syntax: An introduction, Cambridge University Press, 2004" has is an auxiliary ...
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4answers
360 views

A list of parts of speech

I want to know if there are other parts of speech -other than particles- in other languages than English or other Romance/Germanic languages.
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1answer
82 views

What's a good test to distinguish past participles from predicate adjectives?

Most past participles can act as predicate adjectives: "The island was inhabited." but there are some words that may look like both parts of speech, but can only be used in one way or the other: "...
2
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1answer
33 views

Classification of adjuncts in preposition phrases

In the sentence "the mad cow jumped right over the moon", the adjunct 'right' modifies the preposition 'over' in the preposition phrase 'right over the moon'. As the adjunct 'mad' to 'cow' is an ...
2
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1answer
93 views

How many gaps should a sentence have to be solvable but not too easy?

At the moment I am coding an automatic cloze generator on Text on the following way: Use a summarizer to find relevant sentences in a text based on frequency Use Pos Tagging on the remaining ...
3
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1answer
100 views

What part of speech is “city of”, “university of”, “county of”?

Is there a name for the phrases "city of", "university of", "county of", etc? As in, City of New York, University of Florida, County of Cork.
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4answers
157 views

Parts of speech in a language

I am starting studying linguistics independently. I have a few basic doubts. English has following types of words: nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, interjection. ...
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1answer
218 views

Gold Part-Of-Speech tags

I've read this term in many papers in NLP: (Gold POS tags). what does it mean? Thanks.
5
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1answer
198 views

Semantic Relatedness metric across Parts of Speech

I am a student in psychology, but I have very little familiarity with linguistics. I am doing working on flexible cognition and memory, and we are developing a task that requires participants to ...
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0answers
111 views

Preposition vs. Subordinating Conjunction in English

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston & Pullum), which was published in 2002, expanded the scope of the part of speech "preposition" to such a great extent that a significant ...
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1answer
86 views

Word commonly tagged as noun but use as verb

Given a sentence "Someone has to walk the shore and map the island, see what else there is". The "map" word is a verb, but it's commonly used as noun, i.e., in most of dictionaries, the first word ...
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2answers
214 views

Do all languages share the same set of parts of sentence? [closed]

I know, that there is a relation between part of sentence and part of speech, namely elements from parts of speech can be combined following certain rules in order to be used as a part of sentence ...
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1answer
77 views

Do affixes and clitics belong to an own part of speech, part of sentence or another category ?

Birds, flowers, children belong to the part of speech of nouns, to fish, to pick, to play to verbs, swift, smelly, nice to adjectives those are the easy ones, what about clitics and affixes and such ...
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1answer
112 views

Is pronoun a subset of nouns when referring to parts of speech?

To be frank, I am very unsure about this, but having two sets and not knowing how they relate, there are four possibilities so far: nouns and pronouns are own sets without any connection between ...
3
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2answers
190 views

singular part of speech for multi-word units and expressions?

Part of speech assignment provides a pos to a word. In many pos systems this can occasionally produce errors due multi-word expressions of one form or another. When 'we' look at the text, we may see ...
1
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1answer
239 views

NLP conversion between parts of speech and pertainyms?

I would like to write a program that can automatically group e.g. 'happiness', 'happily', 'happy' into 'happy': What do I need to read to get a handle on this subject? What is it called? What is the ...
3
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3answers
112 views

What is the word class of the first part of a partitive genitive?

I'm trying to determine the part of speech in the following example: German: Mario Götze ist einer der besten Fußballspieler der Welt. (partitive genitive) English: Mario Götze is one of the ...
4
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3answers
298 views

What parts of speech are the most, and least, susceptible to linguistic change? And why?

What parts of speech are the most susceptible, and the least susceptible, to linguistic change? And why? I would think that nouns are the most susceptible, and that closed word classes, such as ...
7
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2answers
377 views

What really makes adverbs different from adjectives?

I just tried to answer a question that amounted to knowing whether adverbs can be inflected. Then, doing a bit of search for examples, I came up with the impression that, in many cases, I could not ...
2
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1answer
135 views

How to determine if a word is a verb besides looking in a list of verbs?

I'm building a PoS tagger and I was wondering if there is a way to determine if a word is a verb other than looking in a list of verbs. What i'm doing is marking all words as nouns, then if it ends ...
3
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1answer
603 views

What is the difference in word pairs like “scary” and “scared” [closed]

Take the word pairs "scary" and "scared", or "pleasing" and "pleased". The former adjectives give the impression of inspiring the particular emotion, and the latter adjectives are the emotion itself. ...
4
votes
1answer
333 views

Mine, Yours, Ours, His, Hers, Its, and Don't Forget Theirs

What exactly are the Indo-European predicative mine/yours/ours/his/hers/its/theirs forms, in terms of word class and inflection? Would they be considered the genitive (or even the dative) case of ...
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5answers
657 views

What part of speech is 'found' in this sentence?

I have recently applied for an English teaching position in Brazil and had to take a test in which they asked: Choose the correct part of speech for 'FOUND' in the setence "A whale found dead on the ...
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2answers
187 views

What part of speech is the French “à la mode”?

What is "à la mode" in French? I am thinking it must be an adjective but wondering how this might be represented in an arbre syntagmatique. I am new to linguistics and just trying to get a solid ...
1
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0answers
208 views

Adjectives/verbs being used as nouns: the trend grows?

"I want a job with a social connect" , using a verb connect for the noun connection. "It's a fail!" , using the verb fail instead of the noun failure. "Acme is a multinational corporate" , using the ...
4
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2answers
168 views

What parts of speech do professional jargons tend to mint?

Many English-based jargons include newly created nouns, verbs and adjectives; and re-appropriate existing English nouns, verbs, and adjectives to new ends. I can't come up with an example of a newly ...
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1answer
1k views

Is “soon” in “it is soon” a predicative adverb or adjective or both?

In English in sentences like it is soon or he is fine what is the part of speech of the last word?
5
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4answers
367 views

Which language has verb/noun compounding features?

Often languages have compounding phrases with the same Part Of Speech (POS) and it becomes a morphological analysis problem in Natural Language Processing (NLP). The most notorious being infinite ...
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1answer
97 views

The word 'all' as an article, rather than an adjective?

The grammar descriptions of some languages seem to treat words like all and no, as in 'all giraffes are yellow' and 'no pigs have wings' simply as adjectives, because the words they determine are the ...