Tagged Questions

The discrete and distinctive units constituting the internalized inventory of sounds of a language. A sequence of phonemes is the preverbal form of a word. Phonemes may be systematically distorted upon verbalization, resulting in an allophone. Phonemes and allophones are both "phones".

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1answer
25 views

acoustic features for english phonems

in this following paper , if we go to page no- 126 we will find a table with all acoustic features of all german Phonemes. ...
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4answers
507 views

Can a vowel and a consonant be allophones of the same phoneme?

Are there languages where a vowel and a consonant can be allophones of the same phoneme?
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1answer
52 views

SAMPA of a language - phones or phonemes?

I currently hear a lecture with the topic "Spoken Language Processing" and I have problems to understand SAMPA. I know that the IPA encodes the phones of human languages, so its possible to encode the ...
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2answers
152 views

When I hear the sound “s” am I hearing [s] or /s/… or?

This is really a terminological issue. The phoneme is only in the mind of the speaker /s/ The phonological segment is that which the speaker articulates [s] What is it that the speaker "hears"? Is ...
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1answer
86 views

Does any language using the Latin alphabet have a unique name for “w”?

In English, we call w "double-u", referring to the original representation of [w], which looked like uu, or two us. Then, in French, they pronounce it "double-veh", presumably because the modern form ...
4
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1answer
83 views

What were allophone rules for [r] in Old English and Middle English?

I gather that [r] (trill) was realized as [ɹ] in different dialects of Old English and Middle English, but when [r] was used, was it an allophone? In other words, did [r] vary predictably with [ɹ] ...
3
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1answer
76 views

Consonantal innovations in Hungarian

The Hungarian language seems to have many phonetic features uncommon in other Uralic languages- for example, phonemic voicing in its stops and sibilants and the presence of a labiodental fricative ...
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1answer
530 views

List of French minimal pairs

I recently asked a general question about minimal pairs (i.e. words that differ by one phoneme) and got a link to a website that provides a comprehensive list of English minimal pairs. Is there a ...
3
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1answer
91 views

Which English phonemes can be distinguished via lip-reading?

Is there a comprehensive list about which phonemes in the English language can be distinguished via lip-reading and which can't?
2
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1answer
172 views

Resource for German minimal pairs

I recently asked a general question about minimal pairs and got a link to a website that provides a comprehensive list of English minimal pairs. Is there a similar list for German minimal pairs?
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0answers
117 views

Database of words that differ by one phoneme

I want to test whether people are able to distinguish different phonemes from each other. Example: men (/mɛn/) and man (/mæn/) The user of the software is supposed to hear the correct pronunciation ...
0
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2answers
290 views

How many different distinctive sounds can an average human make?

If we wanted to create an all new alphabet composed of as much letters as possible, with each letter corresponding to one distinctive sound. What's the maximum amount of letters we could have? Oh and ...
1
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2answers
197 views

List of phoneme per language

I there a resource that lists the phonemes that are used in different languages? I would prefer a ranking of the most common phonemes within each language like in this example: German: 1 /ɛ/ 2 /ə/ ...
4
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1answer
212 views

Question regarding leading “r” sounds in Japanese

I'll start by saying I'm not trained in formal linguistics. So I won't have the slightest qualms being told what I'm saying doesn't make too much sense. I'm a native speaker of American English. I've ...
1
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1answer
68 views

Australian Aboriginal Languages: Fricatives

Can anyone give me any information at all on the distribution of fricatives (or the lack thereof) in Australian aboriginal languages, nearby languages, and worldwide? Additionally, any further or ...
4
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2answers
104 views

How do you figure out the underlying sound of several allophones?

For example if I know that [s],[z], [dz] and [ez] are allophones. How do I determine the underlying phoneme sound?
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0answers
55 views

Where do I get all the phonemes of RP English in audio?

I need an authoritative link or a standard which linguists use as a reference point (to compare). It would be not bad if someone knows more or less right phonemes (wav) links (with correct formants ...
6
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0answers
142 views

IPA for Slender Irish /r'/ in Connemara Dialects

Edit: I would also be willing to reward the bounty if someone can partially answer the question by stating if my proposed IPA is possible based on the description or not. I am specifically asking ...
4
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1answer
86 views

Do some words have secondary or unintended click consonants?

I am currently trying to learn Tamil. My friend who is teaching me seems to be making a clicking sound with one word in particular, and she can't seem to tell she's making it. The word is குளம் ...
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2answers
146 views

What, if any, difference is there between long vowels and a double vowels?

What, if any, difference is there between long vowels and a double vowels, i.e. consecutive identical vowels? For example, what is the difference between /i:/ and /ii/? Phonetically, could it be ...
2
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3answers
218 views

Can a phoneme function as an allophone?

Let's say some hypothetical language had the phones [g],[k],[ʔ],[h] and we determined /g/ to be the UR of the following allophones: /g/: [g],[k],[ʔ] But upon further examination, you may be able to ...
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1answer
56 views

Pronunciation Dictionary for Portuguese

Is there any comprehensive pronunciation dictionary for Portoguese language like CMU dictionary for English? Thanks.
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1answer
164 views

Correlation between vowel sounds and compact alphabet used in English and its acceptance

English is the preferred language in many fields of study and in international communications, it has more vowel sounds than many languages, but a compact alphabet, which in my opinion is why English ...
2
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1answer
104 views

Is there a language-independent notation system that can compare the phonemes found in different languages?

I need to make a comparison of the phonemes commonly spoken in Standard Chinese and English to spot the differences. I tried to use some IPA charts, but then found in Convert audio recording of word ...
3
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0answers
106 views

What is the difference between an ejective consonant and a sequence of consonant + glottal stop?

Is it just the simultaneousness? Also - can a sequence of say uvular stop and glottal stop become - diachronically - an uvular ejective? Thanks :))
2
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5answers
712 views

Languages with the fewest phonemes

Which natural languages have the fewest phonemes?
3
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1answer
354 views

Where can I find a dataset of language phoneme sets?

I'm looking for a dataset of phoneme sets for the most widely spoken languages. Something like the sort of thing available here: http://web.phonetik.uni-frankfurt.de/upsid.html though the data there ...
3
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1answer
203 views

Is there a way to learn Icelandic phonetics online?

I want to learn Icelandic online, but am struggling to produce some phonemes. I am unable to find an IPA translator for Icelandic and think it'd be easier for me if I could see some of what I learn ...
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0answers
104 views

What does a phonemic rewrite mean?

We have been doing phonemic rules in class, and our professor says to write a "phonemic rewrite" of words based on these rules, where these words are written like so "/_/". While I understand the ...
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2answers
288 views

Why do people from a certain region sometimes have difficulty pronouncing certain sounds?

There is a word in Indian Bengali which is "sala", but in Banladesh Bengali it is pronounced as "Hala". The "s" becomes "h" in a Bangladeshi's tongue. Similarly "Tsunami" seems to be impossible to be ...
4
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1answer
351 views

IPA for phonemes - does this make sense at all?

On the Wikipedia page for the International Phonetic Alphabet, slashes for phonemes are mentioned quite casually, without getting into the discussion of how or if it makes sense to use a phonetic ...
8
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1answer
626 views

Is there a language with but one vowel sound?

Is there a language known to have no minimal pairs separating vowels, or in which only one vowel exists phonemically in the language, or whose speakers don't detect a difference between any two vowels ...
1
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1answer
415 views

Mandarine Phonemes: Which ones are not shared by English AND the most likely to be used?

There are 214 (by one count) Mandarin phonemes. How can I learn Which of those are not shared by English? Which of the remaining number are in the most common use (assuming they follow the Pareto ...
4
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1answer
173 views

For natural languages, are there writing systems that consist entirely of signs for phonemes on one hand and grammatical morphemes on the other?

At omniglot.com, we find scripts whose characters more-or-less stand for consonant phonemes, or all phonemes, or syllables, or words. But I've never heard of a language whose written form consists ...
10
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2answers
410 views

Is there an IPA character for the sympathetic sucking in sound?

Is there an IPA symbol for the sound you might make when you burn yourself or someone tells you a story about an injury they have—when you suck your breath quickly through your teeth with your ...
3
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0answers
134 views

Patterns of accent changes by non-native English speakers

I am looking for a list of 'accent changes', or pronunciation inaccuracies, non-native English speakers commonly make when speaking English words. The list would obviously be native language specific ...
7
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1answer
201 views

“oeuvre”: foreign phonemes in a loanword

I recently came across oeuvre, which in the two out of two times I've heard the word spoken (in an English context), sounded like it does in Merriam-Webster's online audio pronunciation, that is, with ...
4
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3answers
2k views

Definition(s) of phoneme

What different definitions of phoneme do you know? Please note that I'm not asking for an explanation of what phoneme is but rather for professional definitions. I'm interested in how the issue is ...
4
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4answers
230 views

Are there languages in which two or all three of /χ/, /x/, and /ç/ are opposed as distinct phonemes?

These (and some others) are all quite similar raspy sounds to most ears and by features other than place of articulation: [χ] unvoiced uvular fricative [x] unvoiced velar fricative [ç] unvoiced ...
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3answers
1k views

Where did Spanish get its /x/? Arabic influence?

Most Romance languages don't have /x/ (like the j in hijo), nor did Latin. Where did Spanish /x/ come from? Internal development, Arabic influence, or something else? Since Moroccan Arabic also has ...
5
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2answers
757 views

Where does the term “segment” fit in in relation to “phone” and “phoneme”?

In a recent question seeking to clarify how diphthongs relate to phonemes, another term popped up in the comments, segment. This made me wonder if "segment" is some kind of synonym for either "phone" ...
8
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3answers
3k views

Is a diphthong one phoneme or two, or does it depend?

In Mitch's answer to "What is the difference between a diphthong and a glide?" and its comments it seems more than one of us is at least a bit confused as to how many phonemes a single diphthong ...
3
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7answers
523 views

If similar phonemes are pronounced the same, will this be difficult to understand for a native speaker?

In French, phonemes like /e/ and /ɛ/ are so similar in sound. In English, phonemes like /o/ and /ɔ/ are just so similar too. Brief is that, in almost any language, there are phonemes which are very ...
7
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3answers
576 views

Which languages other than Chinese have apical vowels?

Which languages other than some Chinese languages have apical vowels? The "apical vowels" are the i in zi, ci, si (in IPA: z̩ (also seen as ɿ)) and ʐ̩ (also seen as ʅ). They are basically buzzed ...
7
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1answer
275 views

How do you determine the phonemes in small phonemic inventories?

Languages with small phoneme inventories such as Pirahã often encourage different constructions of the phoneme system. In the case of Pirahã, it either lacks phonemic velars or phonemic nasals. Are ...
9
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6answers
636 views

What is a phoneme in the context of a signed language?

A phoneme is the smallest contrastive unit in the sound system of a language. SIL.
7
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7answers
1k views

Is the very concept of the phoneme disputed?

I believe there was some important research published in recent decades which brought a fundamental change to the way linguists think about phonemes. Or is it that the concept of the phoneme has ...
3
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1answer
375 views

What are typical triphones used in natural language processing?

Reading the claims of Method for natural voice recognition based on a generative transformation/phrase structure grammar What exactly would they be looking at in a sentence to aid the processing? ...