Used for the visual representation of speech sounds.

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2
votes
4answers
72 views

How do they separate phones' length?

In phonetics we use below symbols to talk about phones' length. My question is that how do we measure it? In other words, since these terms (long, half-long extra-short) are relative, how do we ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

which kind of phonetic symbol is it?

I read a electric dictionary in which the phonetic symbol are descirbed in the weird form. For example: afar / E5fB:(r); E`fBr/ which kind of phonetic symbol is it? Is there a full mapping ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

How is an archiphoneme represented on the phonetic level?

Consider an archiphoneme N that can be realized as n, ng, or as a nasal on a vowel depending on the context. Is this representation, below, standard i.e. with the archiphoneme as a capital letter on ...
2
votes
1answer
192 views

When do syllabic consonants occur?

Is there a set of rules to know when syllabic consonants (l, m, n, ng, r) occur in a word? For instance, I used to think that there was a schwa before the l, m, n, ng, and r in the words police, ...
3
votes
1answer
124 views

What is X in a syllable C=consonant, V=vowel

I don't under stand (X) and (s/sh) in this sentence. As opposed to Hebrew CV(X)(C), the non-Semitic syllable structure of Israeli, (s/sh)(C)(C)V(C)(C)(s/sh)
0
votes
0answers
39 views

In a phonetic transcription, what do curved brackets mean?

[Source:] (ə) before /l/, /m/, or /n/ indicates that the syllable may be realized with a syllabic l, m, or n, rather than with a vowel and consonant, e.g. /ˈbʌt(ə)n/ rather than /ˈbʌtən/.
2
votes
1answer
92 views

What is the history of /ɨ/ vs /ï/?

The Close central unrounded vowel has two symbols in the IPA: /ɨ/ /ï/ It appears (from my completely unscientific survey of having seen the symbols in use) that the former is the more common. ...
5
votes
2answers
372 views

Phonology vs phonetics : /ʁɔz/ vs [ʁoz]

It's written on French Wikipedia that the noun “rose” is represented in phonology by /ʁɔz/ whereas Wiktionary is claiming that it should be /ʁoz/. In both case, the associated representation in common ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

What are the different ways prosodic features of a language are represented throughout the history of linguistics?

I can name a few: 1. Tones as numbers 2. Intonation contour as a line above the sentence 3. Tones as lines above segments 4. Stress marks before stress syllables ['white house] vs [white 'house] But ...
1
vote
3answers
508 views

Determining underlying representation

I'm really confused about how to determine underlying representation. Every thing I read seems to contradict the last. Trying desperately to solve this problem and I just seem to be going in circles ...
3
votes
2answers
358 views

What is the history of the International Phonetic Alphabet?

I know it has its origins in the International Phonetic Association, but the idea of a unique alphabet for each speech sound of the world's languages organized by place and manner must've had an ...
1
vote
2answers
277 views

Why don't any languages have strictly one character for every single phonetic sound?

Of the languages I know about, most of them (not Chinese, Japanese, etc.) only have characters or character groups for specific sounds, and also can have a single specific sound generated by placing ...
1
vote
1answer
147 views

SAMPA of a language - phones or phonemes?

I currently hear a lecture with the topic "Spoken Language Processing" and I have problems to understand SAMPA. I know that the IPA encodes the phones of human languages, so its possible to encode the ...
2
votes
2answers
73 views

IPA notation for syllabic [n] after another [n]

Written German has verbs like <können> ‘can’, but some (quick, lazy, …) speakers – myself included – pronounce this word form without any /e/ or schwa sound in the second nucleus. There are still ...
2
votes
1answer
224 views

For the 'ch' sound in Chilean Spanish, do these symbols differ?

I am researching dialects in Chilean Spanish , and one feature that is often mentioned (and one that you can hear all across Chile in conversation) is the varying pronunciation of the 'ch' sound. I ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Symbols for IPA categories

In IPA a consonant can have different places of articulation such as Bilabial, Labio-dental, Dental etc. I want to create a IPA chart that doesn't take much space. For that purposes the words are too ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Are there any good open source English text to IPA/other phonetics alphabet transcription programs?

I'm writing a computer program which requires some of this functionality at one point, so I wanted to get into a (better-written) code and have a look, to get some inspiration. Are there any good ones ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Where can I find a dataset of language phoneme sets?

I'm looking for a dataset of phoneme sets for the most widely spoken languages. Something like the sort of thing available here: http://web.phonetik.uni-frankfurt.de/upsid.html though the data there ...
3
votes
1answer
491 views

Is there a way to learn Icelandic phonetics online?

I want to learn Icelandic online, but am struggling to produce some phonemes. I am unable to find an IPA translator for Icelandic and think it'd be easier for me if I could see some of what I learn ...
3
votes
1answer
218 views

Is phonics still considered a strong teaching tool for teaching reading skills?

A number of years ago there was a company called "Hooked on Phonics", which made a name for itself with a successful ad campaign, and whose aim was to emphasize connecting different phonemes of words ...
-3
votes
1answer
75 views

Several Questions Please Help with Answers [closed]

a. Some English words have more letters in their spelling than they have sounds in their pronunciation, but none have more sounds than they have letters. b. If an English word has 3 vowels sounds, ...
8
votes
1answer
530 views

How can I differentiate between syllable-initial [ɣ] and [ə] using Praat or other software?

I am currently studying Amdo Tibetan. In this language the voiced velar fricative [ɣ] is reported to occur as the first sound in some syllable-initial consonant clusters. More specifically, this sound ...
7
votes
2answers
479 views

What do the “less-than” and “greater-than” signs mean when used as IPA vowel diacritics?

I was recently reading an academic paper on Amdo Tibetan phonetics and the author uses IPA vowel diacritics that look like "less-than" and "greater-than" signs. Here is a picture so you know what I'm ...
7
votes
2answers
158 views

What do reversed and dotted tone letters mean?

The IPA uses the 5 tone-letters ˥,˦,˧,˨,˩. Unicode also has reversed (꜒,꜓,꜔,꜕,꜖) and dotted tone bars (꜈,꜉,꜊,꜋,꜌; ꜍,꜎,꜏,꜐,꜑). What are these characters used for?
6
votes
1answer
287 views

Cents symbol in phonology

In examining Chol's phonology, I came across the (old?) cents symbol ¢ (with a slanted line) as a phoneme symbol. I have not been able to track what it corresponds to in IPA terms, but I suspect it's ...