The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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78 views

Understanding the STRUT vowel as a listener without the split

John Wells' Lexical Sets define a FOOT vowel /ʊ/ for words like 〈full〉, 〈look〉 and 〈could〉, and a STRUT vowel /ʌ/ for words like 〈cub〉, 〈rub〉 and 〈hum〉. However, I am from the North of England and do ...
2
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70 views

What is the linguistic name of [r͡ʙ]?

I am creating a language with the sound [r͡ʙ]. The only name I can come up for this sound would be a simultaneous bilabial and alveolar trill. Is there anything more scientific than that? It cannot ...
5
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1answer
87 views

Is the schwa nasalized before a nasal?

I know that vowels are nasalized before a nasal in the same syllable in English. I am wondering if this would include the schwa [ə] as well? Example, would the schwa in "restriction [rɪstrɪkʃən]" be ...
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50 views

What cognizable limits are there in Articulatory phonetics?

For example, I know that the tone component (like in Chinese) is absent in speech as it varies from time to time (it also depends on situation). Considering vowels there's an agreement to check only ...
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1answer
146 views

Is it possible to have an underlying phoneme in complementary distribution?

Might seem like a stupid question but I'm rather confused right now! :) Also if anyone has any answers to the following... Consider these phonetic forms of Hebrew words: [v] – [b] bika ‘lamented’ ...
3
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2answers
94 views

Do fricatives turn into affricates after nasal consonants, and why?

I have noticed in a word like sense, the 〈s〉 is pronounced not like a fricative but as the affricate [t͡s] because it is followed by the nasal consonant /n/. Is this phenomenon (a fricative turning ...
3
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2answers
136 views

Is jaw position essential or incidental in vowel production?

My classical voice teacher emphasizes an exercise where I am to sing through a sequence of vowels while maintaining the same open jaw position. The idea is that a singer should be able to produce ...
4
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1answer
74 views

Do some words have secondary or unintended click consonants?

I am currently trying to learn Tamil. My friend who is teaching me seems to be making a clicking sound with one word in particular, and she can't seem to tell she's making it. The word is குளம் ...
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1answer
87 views

Do people speaking Cantonese tend to sound hyponasal?

For those people coming speaking Cantonese, do they tend to sound hyponasal, when they speak Cantonese, and speak English? Thanks!
5
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1answer
60 views

Does the initial part of voiced consonants always have a low pitch?

The spectral graphs in the accepted answer of "What is the difference between voiced and voiceless stop consonants?" shows that in English, the initial part (before the stop release) of voiced stop ...
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2answers
80 views

Are voiced stops in English articulated in the same manner as their nasal counterparts before the stop release?

I have a question regarding the initial part of stop consonants in English. Let's take /b/, the voiced bilabial stop consonant, as an example. When I produce this consonant, prior to the stop ...
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96 views

Secondary articulation vs assimilation

I was teaching a linguistics class and I came across this topic "secondary articulation". It was the first time for me to hear the term. I had always known that the effect of a preceding or following ...
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81 views

What ocurrs when a non-strident consonant becomes strident in English?

What is happening when a sound in RP English usage is non-strident [ð] is replaced by a strident sound [v]? For instance, the word 'Father'.
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2answers
99 views

What, if any, difference is there between long vowels and a double vowels?

What, if any, difference is there between long vowels and a double vowels, i.e. consecutive identical vowels? For example, what is the difference between /i:/ and /ii/? Phonetically, could it be ...
2
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2answers
90 views

What is the phonological process whereby a speaker uses [ʊ] as a replacement for [l]?

What is the phonological process whereby a speaker would use [ʊ] as a replacement for [l]? Some examples off the top of my head; [lɪtl] -> [lɪtʊ], [gɪgl] -> [gɪgʊ], [twɪŋkl] -> [twɪŋkʊ]
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3answers
155 views

Can a phoneme function as an allophone?

Let's say some hypothetical language had the phones [g],[k],[ʔ],[h] and we determined /g/ to be the UR of the following allophones: /g/: [g],[k],[ʔ] But upon further examination, you may be able to ...
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97 views

Is the /k/ sound in McDonald considered syllabic? (and insertion of /@/ when pronouncing syllable onsets)

Using the formal syllable identification rules, you have the following (with an example pronunciation): MacDonald => Mac + Don + ald (`/məkdˈɒnl̩d/`) McDonald => McDon + ald (`/məkdˈɒnl̩d/`) ...
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115 views

Are nasals stop consonants?

Nasals: I must answer the question but I am not sure how to understand it... The question is: why nasals both can and cannot be treated as stop consonants? I thought that nasals cannot be stop ...
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2answers
131 views

English: Why can’t you ever find [l] opposed to [ɫ]? And why can’t you ever find [h] opposed to [ŋ]?

I'm a not a native speaker and I just begun studying English. I'm not used to phonetics at all. I know that is has something to do with pronunciation, but I really don't have any idea. I'll be ...
2
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1answer
179 views

Does Mandarin Chinese have phonetically voiced plosives, fricatives, or affricates (besides “r” = [ʐ] / [ɻ])?

The various Wikipedia articles covering Standard Chinese all seem to agree that Mandarin does not have voiced plosives, fricatives, or affricates except for [ʐ] / [ɻ], written in Pinyin as "r". But ...
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828 views

Why is /h/ called voiceless vowel phonetically, and /h/ consonant phonologically?

Why is /h/ called voiceless vowel phonetically, and /h/ consonant phonologically?
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1answer
158 views

Do any languages have half-voiced affricates?

While hearing something on the radio in Lisbon, I heard this phrase: A lei diz que tu não podes... (The law says you can't...) The word that interests me the most is the last one podes which is ...
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83 views

Characteristics of African American Vernacular English

The actor in this Youtube comedy video seems to be imitating African American Vernacular English (AAVE). I wonder how successful he is. The grammatical features seem to be pretty accurate: y'all as ...
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99 views

What is the consonant equivalent of Well's lexical sets for English vowels?

In Accents of English (1982), John C. Wells came up with a useful notation for English vowels that allows easy comparison of the pronunciation of English vowels in varieties of this language. This ...
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65 views

Gulf Arabic vowels allophones

No matter how much I browse, I cannot find any true researcher's really precise and accurate data on the issue. Actually, I cannot find any Gulf Arabic Phonology compendium, so any help will be ...
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1answer
249 views

Phonological vowel length in American English due to (t-)flapping

The following is a quote from a Wikipedia page on American English phonology and concerns flapping in American English: The flapping of intervocalic /t/ and /d/ to alveolar tap [ɾ] before ...
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1answer
174 views

Where can I find a dataset of language phoneme sets?

I'm looking for a dataset of phoneme sets for the most widely spoken languages. Something like the sort of thing available here: http://web.phonetik.uni-frankfurt.de/upsid.html though the data there ...
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129 views

Is a glottal stop common for vowel-initial words in Fenno-Baltic and Nordic languages?

The aforementioned languages form a certain language union, although they belong to different language families and even branches. The languages in question are all the Scandinavic languages ...
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904 views

What is juncture in phonetics and/or phonology?

What is juncture in phonetics and/or phonology? From the Wikipedia article on Juncture, I gathered that juncture is a phonological (and/or phonetic?) phenomenon that allows listeners/speakers of ...
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180 views

How do we know that Ancient Greek didn't have ejectives?

Ancient Greek had a three way contrast between voiced, unvoiced, and aspirated stops. It seems to be assumed that the unvoiced stops were pulmonic, but how do we know this? A fact that may or may not ...
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305 views

Software request: Spectrograms that represent intensity with a colour gradient

There is a range of computer programs that can represent acoustic energy graphically in a spectrogram. I usually use Praat, which uses a black and white gradient to represent the intensity of energy ...
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78 views

What are Georgian harmonic clusters phonetically?

According to Georgian: A Reading Grammar by Howard I. Aronson, Georgian has many "harmonic clusters" consisting of two consonants pronounced with only a single release. (The consonants must be stops ...
3
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2answers
309 views

Are there marked/“hard” phonemes that are acquired very late or never by a substantial number of speakers?

Marked phonemes are those that require more effort during articulation or are "harder" to articulate. For example, the interdental fricatives /θ/ and /ð/ are considered to be marked. Marked phonemes ...
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1answer
303 views

How do sentence intonation and (syllable-based) tone interact in tone languages?

Tone languages use intonation to distinguish words. For example, in Mandarin Chinese mā with a mid tone means mom mǎ with a rising tone means horse Intonation languages do not make such ...
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293 views

How can I distinguish different consonants in Praat/acoustic analysis?

How can I distinguish different consonants based on acoustic information/spectrographic analysis such as in Praat? Is there a list of acoustic cues for different consonants like there is for average ...
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86 views

Are click sounds accompanied by specific formant transitions?

Is it possible to identify click sounds like [‖ ʘ !] by formant transitions in the surrounding vowels? I know stops and fricatives have that feature. I'm just wondering how the five (main) click ...
2
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1answer
87 views

Is [ɹ] +ATR or -ATR or is that even relevant?

Has there been any investigation into the ATR quality of the central alveolar approximant [ɹ]? It is very vowel-like and I have this theory that it could simply be the result of an advanced tongue ...
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338 views

Common problems in second language pronunciation

Transfer of some phonetic/phonological features from the first language to a second language is common in second language acquisition. For example, aspiration is not phonemic in English. Voiceless ...
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327 views

Theories on L1 transfer/interference in L2 pronunciation/phonetics/phonology

What theories explain the transfer of phonetic and phonological features from the first language to a second or foreign language? How do these theories differ from each other? Such theories should ...
4
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3answers
289 views

The “writer / rider” distinction

In some dialects of English (for example: General American), “writer” is said to be pronounced differently from “rider” due to the following two phonological rules (done in this order): Vowels are ...
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1answer
228 views

Computationally differentiating between CVC, VCV and CV syllables

I want to develop a program which can differentiate between CVC, VCV, and CV syllable types. I'm having trouble knowing when vowel has ended in CVC and CV syllables. I want to read more about it. ...
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105 views

Given two vowel phonemes that contrast by length alone, will their phonetic realizations typically have different vowel qualities?

Given two vowel phonemes that contrast by length alone, will their phonetic realizations typically have different vowel qualities? For example, if a language has two vowel phonemes, /ɑ:/ and /ɑ/, ...
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79 views

What are the allophones of /ɹ/ in General Western English?

What are the allophones of /ɹ/ in General Western English? By General Western English, I mean the dialect of English that is spoken by people raised in Seattle, WA; Portland, OR; and other ...
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1answer
159 views

Is there a way to learn Icelandic phonetics online?

I want to learn Icelandic online, but am struggling to produce some phonemes. I am unable to find an IPA translator for Icelandic and think it'd be easier for me if I could see some of what I learn ...
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2answers
346 views

What are the differences between the French and English [i] and how does it affect the perception?

I'm rephrasing my question after (very helpful) comments to my initial version: What are the differences between the [i] produced by French speakers (in French) and English speakers (in English)? ...
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3answers
226 views

Is there use of a trilled “L” sound in any language? Is a trilled “L” even possible?

I've seen nothing on a trilled "L" sound anywhere. I've tried producing the trilled "L" sound and I can get something that seems similar. Is it possible to trill an "L" and if so are there any ...
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190 views

Animal sounds across languages

As onomatopoeia, the words used for animal sounds are often quite similar across many languages. However, there are non-trivial differences, even for something as common as the croak of a frog. I was ...
2
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1answer
401 views

Do you have a vowel trapezoid for Spanish?

I am trying to contrast the vowel systems of English and Spanish, and showing two vowel trapezoids seems like a good approach. I've not yet found one yet. Any ideas?
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2answers
166 views

Basic resource on Japanese phonetics

Could you recommend a good reference for studying Japanese phonetics?
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230 views

Understanding Voiced Consonants

I've been having some trouble understanding how is it that what differentiates, for example, /p/ from /b/, is the vibration of the vocal chords, present in /b/, but not in /p/. From what I have read ...