The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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How to work with an IPA chart?

I am trying to learn French vowel sounds using this IPA chart. My question is about this chart. I use it for the first time and I am interested how comprehensive it is. Does a position at this chart ...
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30 views

The 'ch' sound in Chilean Spanish — is there a difference between these symbols?

I am researching dialects in Chilean Spanish , and one feature that is often mentioned (and one that you can hear all across Chile in conversation) is the varying pronunciation of the 'ch' sound. I ...
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1answer
38 views

How are “spectral properties” distinct from “linguistic properties”?

As a linguist, I have a good idea of what linguistic properties of a sound can be: be they describable in terms of distinctive features or whatever. But what, then, are spectral properties? It's not ...
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20 views

Pronunciation software?

Do you know of any pronunciation or phonetics software that would be useful to ESL learners? I have read that software with spectrographs or xrays showing tongue placement are very effective. I am ...
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1answer
45 views

Software that analyses a speech recording and displays a graphic readout

Are there programs that take a recording of human speech as input, perform some kind of phonetic analysis and then return a graphic readout of the phonemes that have been found? I'm currently trying ...
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2answers
145 views

When I hear the sound “s” am I hearing [s] or /s/… or?

This is really a terminological issue. The phoneme is only in the mind of the speaker /s/ The phonological segment is that which the speaker articulates [s] What is it that the speaker "hears"? Is ...
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1answer
52 views

Acoustic description of Polish vowels

Using formants, it is possible to produce an acoustic description of vowel quality. Basically, the first formant (F1) corresponds to vowel height, and the second formant (F2) to vowel backness, as ...
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1answer
39 views

Roles of the vocal cords

I've heard that there are 3 parts to the vocal cords: the true vocal cords, and the "false" vestibular folds and ventricular ligament. I read that the vestibular serves some function in chanting and ...
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1answer
68 views

Suggestions for brushing the insides of lower back teeth

When I brush my toddler's teeth, I want good access to the lingual (inside) side of the lower back teeth, to brush them. Thus, I want my kid with parted lips and teeth and with the tongue pulled away ...
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69 views

Palatalization in English words like street, storm, etc [closed]

More and more people on television are pronouncing street as "shtreet" and storm as "shtorm", replacing the initial /s/ with /ʃ/. Where and when did this start in mainstream America?
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35 views

What phonetic features are commonly used in forensic speaker identification and verification?

Speaker verification is the task of estimating how likely it is that two speech recordings come from the same speaker, while speaker identification tries to match a speech recording with one of a ...
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0answers
79 views

R before TH sound?

Most of time when I say a word with r before θ or ð, my tongue slides on my palate and it goes to down mouth, behind my lower teeth. This movement produce a sound similar with tap or click, sometimes ...
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148 views

Why has Paris French mostly lost the distinction between /e/ and /ɛ/?

Why has Paris French mostly lost the distinction between /e/ and /ɛ/? As in, the difference between 'Je le ferai' and 'Je le ferais', 'poignée' and 'poignet', or more simply between the é sound and ...
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88 views

How is it that such varied sounds (in major European Languages) came to be represented by the same letter “j”?

The letter "j" is pronounced differently in the following major European languages: English: just (just) Spanish: justo (husto) German: junge (yunguh) French: juste (zoost) How is the ...
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2answers
62 views

Where on the Internet can I find sound files so that I can hear the alveo-palatal consonants?

Where on the Internet can I find sound files so that I can hear the alveo-palatal consonants? I've been relying on this chart ... http://westonruter.github.io/ipa-chart/keyboard/ ... to help me ...
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1answer
68 views

Are songs more difficult to understand than normal speech?

On the Internet one can find lists of misheard lyrics. But are songs really more difficult to understand than normal speech? And if so, why is that? You may also want to check out the term ...
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1answer
65 views

Why are f0 candidates stacked vertically in all .pitch files in Praat, like this one?

Why is it that, if I zoom into a .pitch file in Praat, the little numbers (pitch candidates) that are displayed are stacked into vertical lines?
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1answer
61 views

What, if any, prosodic information can be gleaned from a study of a waveform?

Can any sort of prosodic information (e.g. rhythm, intensity, pitch) be seen/understood just from a waveform alone (without reference to e.g. spectrograms)?
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1answer
41 views

Can any Praat scripts perform real-time analyses?

It seems that all Praat scripts operate on recordings. Is there any such thing as a script that performs an analysis "on the fly"?
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1answer
101 views

What name should be given to this allophone of /tʃ/?

I am a native English speaker, but when I make the sound which should be /tʃ/, I have been told that I begin it by placing the tip of my tongue briefly between my teeth, as if I was going to start a ...
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1answer
92 views

Is syllable a phonetic or a phonological concept?

Is syllable a phonetic or a phonological concept? Consider 'syllable counting' as a task: would that be regarded as a phonetic task or phonological tasks? Would it depend on whether words are ...
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2answers
109 views

How to determine one's own native vowel phone repertoire?

I'm an armchair linguist. By this I mean it's been an absorbing hobby for decades by reading books and online and playing with many languages. But I've never taken any course or other kind of formal ...
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65 views

What is “accommodation” in phonetics?

What is "accommodation" in English? What types of accommodation are there? I've tried to search in the Internet, but I could not find proper information.
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207 views

How many different distinctive sounds can an average human make?

If we wanted to create an all new alphabet composed of as much letters as possible, with each letter corresponding to one distinctive sound. What's the maximum amount of letters we could have? Oh and ...
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1answer
205 views

Question regarding leading “r” sounds in Japanese

I'll start by saying I'm not trained in formal linguistics. So I won't have the slightest qualms being told what I'm saying doesn't make too much sense. I'm a native speaker of American English. I've ...
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1answer
67 views

A question about /t/ + fricative /r/ vs /tr/ affrication

So in most accents of English, /r/ is fricated when it follows /t/ and /d/ word-initially, and in some it has become a full affricate /tʃ/. If you were going to look at a spectrogram of this, how ...
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1answer
142 views

How much phonetic/phonological detail can be captured using IPA alone?

Although spectrograms contain much more detail, I'm curious how far phonologists and phoneticists can go with IPA alone. Can someone provide some examples of narrow, detail-rich IPA transcription for ...
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297 views

Correct syllabification in (American) English

I need to figure out what the proper syllabification of words in American English is and why. PLEASE NOTE: I am interested in syllabification from a phonetic point of view, not in terms of ...
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1answer
121 views

Are there tonal languages which use a rising intonation for questions?

I know that in the case of Mandarin Chinese questions do not end with any kind of rising tone unless the last morpheme in the sentence happens to have a rising tone. For questions which don't contain ...
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1answer
95 views

What is the linguistic name of /p͡r/?

I am creating a language called Knashta, and one of the phonemes is /p͡r/. I believe this sound would be a trilled affricate, and I'm guessing that it's name would be a voiceless bilabial alveolar ...
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1answer
70 views

How can I align an image with the spectrogram in Praat?

I am looking for a way to create a new image display in praat that is aligned with the waveform and spectrogram. The image display must be an object in the object window. It must be groupable with the ...
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2answers
226 views

Understanding the STRUT vowel as a listener without the split

John Wells' Lexical Sets define a FOOT vowel /ʊ/ for words like 〈full〉, 〈look〉 and 〈could〉, and a STRUT vowel /ʌ/ for words like 〈cub〉, 〈rub〉 and 〈hum〉. However, I am from the North of England and do ...
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81 views

What is the linguistic name of [r͡ʙ]?

I am creating a language with the sound [r͡ʙ]. The only name I can come up for this sound would be a simultaneous bilabial and alveolar trill. Is there anything more scientific than that? It cannot ...
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1answer
140 views

Is the schwa nasalized before a nasal?

I know that vowels are nasalized before a nasal in the same syllable in English. I am wondering if this would include the schwa [ə] as well? Example, would the schwa in "restriction [rɪstrɪkʃən]" be ...
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53 views

What cognizable limits are there in Articulatory phonetics?

For example, I know that the tone component (like in Chinese) is absent in speech as it varies from time to time (it also depends on situation). Considering vowels there's an agreement to check only ...
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1answer
215 views

Is it possible to have an underlying phoneme in complementary distribution?

Might seem like a stupid question but I'm rather confused right now! :) Also if anyone has any answers to the following... Consider these phonetic forms of Hebrew words: [v] – [b] bika ‘lamented’ ...
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2answers
110 views

Do fricatives turn into affricates after nasal consonants, and why?

I have noticed in a word like sense, the 〈s〉 is pronounced not like a fricative but as the affricate [t͡s] because it is followed by the nasal consonant /n/. Is this phenomenon (a fricative turning ...
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2answers
159 views

Is jaw position essential or incidental in vowel production?

My classical voice teacher emphasizes an exercise where I am to sing through a sequence of vowels while maintaining the same open jaw position. The idea is that a singer should be able to produce ...
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1answer
85 views

Do some words have secondary or unintended click consonants?

I am currently trying to learn Tamil. My friend who is teaching me seems to be making a clicking sound with one word in particular, and she can't seem to tell she's making it. The word is குளம் ...
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1answer
115 views

Do people speaking Cantonese tend to sound hyponasal?

For those people coming speaking Cantonese, do they tend to sound hyponasal, when they speak Cantonese, and speak English? Thanks!
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1answer
79 views

Does the initial part of voiced consonants always have a low pitch?

The spectral graphs in the accepted answer of "What is the difference between voiced and voiceless stop consonants?" shows that in English, the initial part (before the stop release) of voiced stop ...
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2answers
97 views

Are voiced stops in English articulated in the same manner as their nasal counterparts before the stop release?

I have a question regarding the initial part of stop consonants in English. Let's take /b/, the voiced bilabial stop consonant, as an example. When I produce this consonant, prior to the stop ...
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141 views

Secondary articulation vs assimilation

I was teaching a linguistics class and I came across this topic "secondary articulation". It was the first time for me to hear the term. I had always known that the effect of a preceding or following ...
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113 views

What ocurrs when a non-strident consonant becomes strident in English?

What is happening when a sound in RP English usage is non-strident [ð] is replaced by a strident sound [v]? For instance, the word 'Father'.
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2answers
140 views

What, if any, difference is there between long vowels and a double vowels?

What, if any, difference is there between long vowels and a double vowels, i.e. consecutive identical vowels? For example, what is the difference between /i:/ and /ii/? Phonetically, could it be ...
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2answers
100 views

What is the phonological process whereby a speaker uses [ʊ] as a replacement for [l]?

What is the phonological process whereby a speaker would use [ʊ] as a replacement for [l]? Some examples off the top of my head; [lɪtl] -> [lɪtʊ], [gɪgl] -> [gɪgʊ], [twɪŋkl] -> [twɪŋkʊ]
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3answers
191 views

Can a phoneme function as an allophone?

Let's say some hypothetical language had the phones [g],[k],[ʔ],[h] and we determined /g/ to be the UR of the following allophones: /g/: [g],[k],[ʔ] But upon further examination, you may be able to ...
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139 views

Is the /k/ sound in McDonald considered syllabic? (and insertion of /@/ when pronouncing syllable onsets)

Using the formal syllable identification rules, you have the following (with an example pronunciation): MacDonald => Mac + Don + ald (`/məkdˈɒnl̩d/`) McDonald => McDon + ald (`/məkdˈɒnl̩d/`) ...
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131 views

Are nasals stop consonants?

Nasals: I must answer the question but I am not sure how to understand it... The question is: why nasals both can and cannot be treated as stop consonants? I thought that nasals cannot be stop ...
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150 views

English: Why can’t you ever find [l] opposed to [ɫ]? And why can’t you ever find [h] opposed to [ŋ]?

I'm a not a native speaker and I just begun studying English. I'm not used to phonetics at all. I know that is has something to do with pronunciation, but I really don't have any idea. I'll be ...