The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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108 views

Why don't any languages have strictly one character for every single phonetic sound?

Of the languages I know about, most of them (not Chinese, Japanese, etc.) only have characters or character groups for specific sounds, and also can have a single specific sound generated by placing ...
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1answer
134 views

What is an example of a language or dialect that contains triphthongs?

I spent some time on a research project examining spectrograms and coding vowels for speakers of American English from a few rural regions in the state of Oklahoma. I noticed that certain speakers ...
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1answer
161 views

Why is [f] ambiguous between [f] and [s] after saying the word <three>?

I used an automated customer service system that requires reading off one's case id. The case id I had included the sequence "3F." The speech recognition software was only tripped up by that ...
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3answers
70 views

What is the IPA notation for Chinese zuo4cuo4 做错?

zuo4cuo4 is the pinyin-notation for 做错 = doing wrong. To my ear zuo4 and cuo4 sound very similar. I need the IPA notation to understand the difference in articulation.
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60 views

Are there letters or diacritics in the IPA suitable for narrow/phonetic descriptions of the Malay final -h?

In Malay there is a syllable-final -h with some unique properties distinct from the "normal" syllable-initial h. But in all the accounts of the language I can only see a single symbol used, the ...
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58 views

What is the linguistically process behind prolonging of vowels?

Vowels can change from short vowels to long vowels in time But from a diachronic perspective, what is happening? Please fill in with some examples of vowels that have been prolonged and that have ...
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63 views

Is the labiodental flap used only in the beginning of words?

In 2005, the IPA phonetical alphabet got extended by including the labiodental flap. The wikipedia-page shows a good overview. However, I am wondering if the labiodental flap is restricted to be ...
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48 views

What is the difference between an alveolar trill and a syllabic alveolar trill?

I wanted to understand how to articulate the sound ṛ from IAST (transliteration system for indian languages). On Wikipedia i have found this explanation: ऋ पृ [ərə] (traditional) or [ri] ...
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45 views

What phonologically redundant features can capture the characteristic of a voice more specifically?

Background-Explanation: A sound can be described by a list of articulatory features: If the list is sufficient to determine the function of the sound in a particular language, it matches the ...
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95 views

Are the unreleased stops in cantonese discernable by listening?

Background-Info: In contrast to mandarin Chinese, which can only have a few consonants at the and of a syllable, e.g. man, mang, Cantonese syllables can contain p,t,k at their end. Nevertheless, ...
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250 views

Can a stop be both voiced and aspirated?

One day while discussing things with my friends, we came across the topic of trying to pronounce the sound [gh]. No such symbol actually exists in the IPA to my knowledge, but hypothetically it would ...
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62 views

How do I hear “shimmer”?

How would you impressionistically guess if a voice has a high degree of "shimmer" (as opposed to a lot of "jitter"). I know these variable have to do with hoarseness or breathiness, but I have ...
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24 views

How do I draw just one channel of a waveform in Praat?

I have a nice 2-channel recording in Praat. I want to illustrate the waveform for an article, but when I select file>draw visible sound, the result is both channels. Is there any way to adjust this so ...
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2answers
133 views

Does sample text exist that includes most sounds represented by the International Phonetic Alphabet?

My understanding of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is that it aims to provide a set of letter-based values that represent and map to fundamental sounds present in human languages. My ...
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37 views

acoustic features for english phonems

in this following paper , if we go to page no- 126 we will find a table with all acoustic features of all german Phonemes. ...
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92 views

What's the difference between [ɚ], [ɹ̩], and [əɹ]?

I've seen the "-er" sound in English (like in butter) transcribed in all three of the above ways, but I've heard there are subtle differences between them. What are these differences, if there are ...
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1answer
86 views

What are examples of Haudricourt's tonogenesis in Chinese?

As far as I know, tonogenesis occurs when consonants merge. The merging of initial consonants results in register tones and the merging of final consonants results in contour tones. What are concrete ...
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2answers
76 views

Examples of discrete place-of-articulation changes

Most sound changes that involve consonantal place of articulation are gradual changes between two POAs that are contiguous: for example, a velar gets gradually fronted until it becomes a palatal. What ...
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65 views

Which other languages pronounce <j> as [dʒ]

On a related question, the OP points out that the grapheme j has a variety of pronunciations throughout various languages: as [ʒ] in French, [j] in German, and [x] in Spanish. Does any other language ...
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4answers
556 views

Can a vowel and a consonant be allophones of the same phoneme?

Are there languages where a vowel and a consonant can be allophones of the same phoneme?
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2answers
116 views

How does passing air through a narrow glottis cause vibrations?

I'm studying phonetics as part of a Linguistics degree, and in my textbook, the author discusses how we make our vocal folds narrow, almost touching, such that air passing through vibrates. This is ...
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1answer
81 views

What is the difference between velar and ejective stops?

What is the difference between the velar stop [kʰ] and the ejective [k̛ ]? And how are they pronounced?
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102 views

How to work with an IPA chart?

I am trying to learn French vowel sounds using this IPA chart. My question is about this chart. I use it for the first time and I am interested how comprehensive it is. Does a position at this chart ...
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1answer
98 views

The 'ch' sound in Chilean Spanish — is there a difference between these symbols?

I am researching dialects in Chilean Spanish , and one feature that is often mentioned (and one that you can hear all across Chile in conversation) is the varying pronunciation of the 'ch' sound. I ...
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1answer
58 views

How are “spectral properties” distinct from “linguistic properties”?

As a linguist, I have a good idea of what linguistic properties of a sound can be: be they describable in terms of distinctive features or whatever. But what, then, are spectral properties? It's not ...
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49 views

Pronunciation software?

Do you know of any pronunciation or phonetics software that would be useful to ESL learners? I have read that software with spectrographs or xrays showing tongue placement are very effective. I am ...
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50 views

Software that analyses a speech recording and displays a graphic readout

Are there programs that take a recording of human speech as input, perform some kind of phonetic analysis and then return a graphic readout of the phonemes that have been found? I'm currently trying ...
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183 views

When I hear the sound “s” am I hearing [s] or /s/… or?

This is really a terminological issue. The phoneme is only in the mind of the speaker /s/ The phonological segment is that which the speaker articulates [s] What is it that the speaker "hears"? Is ...
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2answers
89 views

Acoustic description of Polish vowels

Using formants, it is possible to produce an acoustic description of vowel quality. Basically, the first formant (F1) corresponds to vowel height, and the second formant (F2) to vowel backness, as ...
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48 views

Roles of the vocal cords

I've heard that there are 3 parts to the vocal cords: the true vocal cords, and the "false" vestibular folds and ventricular ligament. I read that the vestibular serves some function in chanting and ...
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69 views

Suggestions for brushing the insides of lower back teeth

When I brush my toddler's teeth, I want good access to the lingual (inside) side of the lower back teeth, to brush them. Thus, I want my kid with parted lips and teeth and with the tongue pulled away ...
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86 views

Palatalization in English words like street, storm, etc [closed]

More and more people on television are pronouncing street as "shtreet" and storm as "shtorm", replacing the initial /s/ with /ʃ/. Where and when did this start in mainstream America?
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44 views

What phonetic features are commonly used in forensic speaker identification and verification?

Speaker verification is the task of estimating how likely it is that two speech recordings come from the same speaker, while speaker identification tries to match a speech recording with one of a ...
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88 views

R before TH sound?

Most of time when I say a word with r before θ or ð, my tongue slides on my palate and it goes to down mouth, behind my lower teeth. This movement produce a sound similar with tap or click, sometimes ...
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184 views

Why has Paris French mostly lost the distinction between /e/ and /ɛ/?

Why has Paris French mostly lost the distinction between /e/ and /ɛ/? As in, the difference between 'Je le ferai' and 'Je le ferais', 'poignée' and 'poignet', or more simply between the é sound and ...
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106 views

How is it that such varied sounds (in major European Languages) came to be represented by the same letter “j”?

The letter "j" is pronounced differently in the following major European languages: English: just (just) Spanish: justo (husto) German: junge (yunguh) French: juste (zoost) How is the ...
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84 views

Where on the Internet can I find sound files so that I can hear the alveo-palatal consonants?

Where on the Internet can I find sound files so that I can hear the alveo-palatal consonants? I've been relying on this chart ... http://westonruter.github.io/ipa-chart/keyboard/ ... to help me ...
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73 views

Are songs more difficult to understand than normal speech?

On the Internet one can find lists of misheard lyrics. But are songs really more difficult to understand than normal speech? And if so, why is that? You may also want to check out the term ...
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76 views

Why are f0 candidates stacked vertically in all .pitch files in Praat, like this one?

Why is it that, if I zoom into a .pitch file in Praat, the little numbers (pitch candidates) that are displayed are stacked into vertical lines?
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73 views

What, if any, prosodic information can be gleaned from a study of a waveform?

Can any sort of prosodic information (e.g. rhythm, intensity, pitch) be seen/understood just from a waveform alone (without reference to e.g. spectrograms)?
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58 views

Can any Praat scripts perform real-time analyses?

It seems that all Praat scripts operate on recordings. Is there any such thing as a script that performs an analysis "on the fly"?
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115 views

What name should be given to this allophone of /tʃ/?

I am a native English speaker, but when I make the sound which should be /tʃ/, I have been told that I begin it by placing the tip of my tongue briefly between my teeth, as if I was going to start a ...
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116 views

Is syllable a phonetic or a phonological concept?

Is syllable a phonetic or a phonological concept? Consider 'syllable counting' as a task: would that be regarded as a phonetic task or phonological tasks? Would it depend on whether words are ...
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124 views

How to determine one's own native vowel phone repertoire?

I'm an armchair linguist. By this I mean it's been an absorbing hobby for decades by reading books and online and playing with many languages. But I've never taken any course or other kind of formal ...
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182 views

What is “accommodation” in phonetics?

What is "accommodation" in English? What types of accommodation are there? I've tried to search in the Internet, but I could not find proper information.
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3answers
510 views

How many different distinctive sounds can an average human make?

If we wanted to create an all new alphabet composed of as much letters as possible, with each letter corresponding to one distinctive sound. What's the maximum amount of letters we could have? Oh and ...
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216 views

Question regarding leading “r” sounds in Japanese

I'll start by saying I'm not trained in formal linguistics. So I won't have the slightest qualms being told what I'm saying doesn't make too much sense. I'm a native speaker of American English. I've ...
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96 views

A question about /t/ + fricative /r/ vs /tr/ affrication

So in most accents of English, /r/ is fricated when it follows /t/ and /d/ word-initially, and in some it has become a full affricate /tʃ/. If you were going to look at a spectrogram of this, how ...
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153 views

How much phonetic/phonological detail can be captured using IPA alone?

Although spectrograms contain much more detail, I'm curious how far phonologists and phoneticists can go with IPA alone. Can someone provide some examples of narrow, detail-rich IPA transcription for ...
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406 views

Correct syllabification in (American) English

I need to figure out what the proper syllabification of words in American English is and why. PLEASE NOTE: I am interested in syllabification from a phonetic point of view, not in terms of ...