The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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32 views

Select a portion of a sound in Praat

In Praat, I want to select a portion of the sound, extract it, and save it separately from the original file. This part of the sound is always between 0.108 s and 0.112 s because it is from pure ...
3
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49 views

Why do we use an upward inflection when asking questions?

I have tried Googling where the upward inflection comes from but all I get are "Valley Girl" results. My curiosity in this started with my new German Language course I'm taking and noticed that the ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Palatalised allophones of /k/ and /g/ as a cross-linguistic phenomenon

As a native speaker of Russian, where [k]/[kʲ] and [g]/[gʲ] are phonemically distinct, I've always been intrigued by the fact that several languages that don't have that distinction, and are in fact ...
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1answer
29 views

What statistical methods are appropriate to comparing e.g. VOT across different groups?

As part of forensic linguistics practice, I must assess the relative age of multiple individuals based only voice. One crucial variable is VOT, which is known to decrease with age. So, let's say ...
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60 views

Specifics about the impact of natural gender on pronunciation?

What is the difference in pronunciation between women and men when speaking a language, as opposed to the difference in the voice of men and women? The context for the question arises from my looking ...
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1answer
29 views

What do harmonic-harmonic and harmonic-noise ratios have to do with voice pathology?

I was reading about spectral techniques to detect pathological phonation and came across the plan to establish relations between harmonic-harmonic and harmonic-noise ratios in for certain kinds of ...
0
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1answer
38 views

What's a good technique to understand the differences between the time and frequency domains?

I understand that phonetic analysis can be performed in various domains, among which: time, frequency, cepstral, and spectral. In the time domain, one studies e.g. Rate, energy, and duration. In the ...
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1answer
28 views

How do you learn what an old word might have imitated?

psyche (n.)    1640s, "animating spirit," from Latin psyche, from Greek psykhe "the soul, mind, spirit; breath; life, one's life, the invisible animating principle or entity which occupies and ...
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42 views

Confusion matrix for consonant clusters in English?

I was wondering if anybody knew of a confusion matrix for consonant clusters in the English language. I've seen CV, VC, and CVC phoneme/syllable confusion matrices, but never any with any sort of ...
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1answer
27 views

Making a balanced word list systematically using COCA and CMUdict

I am trying to find words in English that mirror the conditioning environments for spirantization of /b, d, g/ in Spanish. I am balancing for proceeding phone, lexical stress, word-internal vs. ...
5
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79 views

Are there any words that have merged in pronunciation and spelling and then separated again?

Are there any words that started off different, merged in pronunciation and spelling at some point and then separated again? E.g. Two hypothetical words in Old English OX and OY are neither ...
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1answer
33 views

What is the protocol to determine sample size in phonetic research?

I am doing a simple graduate-student research project with a colleague in the CompSci Department. We want to develop a program that automatically distinguishes a man's voice from a woman's. We ...
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2answers
81 views

Is there a comprehensive list of all (or many) phonological rules (specifically allophonic) of the English language available anywhere online?

It would be very helpful to have for a programming project I'm working on involving grapheme-to-phoneme translation. I've been able to find many rules for phonemes but not too many for allophones.
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1answer
14 views

What are the most distinctive differences in the glottal wave between modal vs breathy phonation?

I understan that with modal phonation the glottal wave has a triangular shape, whereas with breathy voice, the source wave is closer to a sine wave. This means that the higher harmonics are more ...
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43 views

Is diphthongising [ʌ] as [ʌɪ] novel or an accent feature?

I have noticed some speakers diphthongising [ʌ] as [ʌɪ]. For example, in Bea Miller’s Young Blood, she pronounces “young blood” as [jʌɪŋ blʌɪd] and “us” as [ʌɪs]. Has this been documented elsewhere? ...
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1answer
32 views

Why are the higher harmonics less prominent in a spectrum of modal (as opposed to breathy) phonation?

I'm trying to learn more about breathiness. I understand that the cepstral peak is less prominent in the cepstrum of breathy phonation than plain ol' modal phonation -- but I'm not sure why this may ...
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2answers
91 views

Word reduction and American T before consonant

when I pronounce the phrase "It was good" in a context like this one: Person A: How was your day? Person B: It was good. I think that "was" is reduced to wəz (with a schwa sound). The only word ...
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1answer
69 views

Does word TA comes from historically, or a psychically to many languages on earth?

Does word TA comes from historically, or a psychically to many languages on earth? Ta, sumerian -root Ta, english -thank Ta, mongolian -grateful and respectful calling of "you" etc
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1answer
175 views

Word stress in English

Though English stress is free there are certain factors or tendencies that determine the place and different degrees of word stress. Vassiliev describes them as follows: Recessive tendency is ...
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67 views

Modifications of consonants

Could you help me to figure out one thing? My task is to comment on the modifications of consonants by the neighbouring sounds(assimilation,ellision). But there are some words in the task where I ...
5
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2answers
280 views

Phonology vs phonetics : /ʁɔz/ vs [ʁoz]

It's written on French Wikipedia that the noun “rose” is represented in phonology by /ʁɔz/ whereas Wiktionary is claiming that it should be /ʁoz/. In both case, the associated representation in common ...
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181 views

What's the evidence for and against isochrony?

The question What evidence is currently known that favors or disfavors the hypothesis that a regular beat of some kind—that is, an “isochrony”—plays some important role in languages? I've run across ...
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1answer
40 views

Why is English word accent traditionally defined as dynamic?

Coud anyone explain why is English word accent traditionally defined as dynamic? Due to some of it's features,history?
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1answer
74 views

Indistinguishability of [f] and [s] on phone - citation?

I have long felt that [f] and [s] are hard to tell apart on the phone, especially when spelling out words letter by letter. As a non linguist (but audio engineer) it seems to me that the frequencies ...
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1answer
65 views

Consonants in the same tongue position

the phrase: "Sit down" phonetically looks like [sɪt daʊn]. The "t" and "d" are in the same tongue position. Can we drop the "t" in the first word in this situation in fast/casual speech? like this: ...
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1answer
41 views

stress of function words in English

Generally speaking, what are conditions under which function words in English are to be stressed. I am working on weak/strong/contracted forms in English and the textbook states that WFs are to be ...
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2answers
99 views

Glide between the words “be” and “okay”

the phrase "It's gonna be okay" phonetically looks like: [ɪts gʌnə bɪ oʊkeɪ] There should be a glide (y) or (w) between the words "be" and "okay": ɪts gʌnə bɪ(y)oʊkeɪ, or ɪts gʌnə bɪ(w)oʊkeɪ I'm ...
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1answer
73 views

What are the stages of child speech and language development and why?

What are the distinct stages, landmarks or milestones in language acquisition in regard to phonetic development? What is the order they're typically reached, and why is it that order? For instance, I ...
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64 views

“h” in French words of Germanic / onomatopoeic origin

As I understand it, the [h]-sound in Latin words (habere, prehendere, etc.) was lost before French became a distinct language. But French also has many words of Germanic or onomatopoeic origin that ...
3
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1answer
167 views

Do cardinal vowels form a plane in 3D-space?

In 'A course in Phonetics' P. Ladefoged writes: If we consider vowels to be specifiable in terms of three dimensions, this implies that the cardinal vowels fall on a plane in this ...
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1answer
46 views

What is the difference between cepstral and temporal domains?

Some parameters of speech analysis occur in the temporal domain (those are the ones I typically understand: f0, formants, etc.) - but others occur in the so-called cepstral domain. If I google ...
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30 views

What does Cepstral Peak Prominence have to do with breathiness?

So I've been reading a lot about CPP as a measurement of certain voice qualities, but I have hard time figuring out exactly what it refers to as most of the material written about this topic is of a ...
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1answer
82 views

Why do peoples(Europe, Asia, Africa, etc) call “God” in very similar ways? [closed]

UK: dieu(the motto on passport - French)/deity(English word) China: tien(Chinese Wade-Giles... t->d) South Africa: modimo(o->əʊ) New Zealand: atua(Maori... t->d) North America: tirawa(Pawnee... w->u ...
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34 views

How to determine and listen to rarer pronunciations?

http://the-toast.net/2014/03/19/a-linguist-explains-british-accents-of-yore/2/ and http://entertainment.time.com/2013/09/20/shakespeare-the-way-it-was-meant-to-be-spoken/ corroborate the necessity of ...
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2answers
40 views

How was the acoustic theory of speech production informed by electrical circuit theory?

The acoustic theory of speech production as worked out by Gunnar Fant depends on a correspondence between the vocal tract and elementary electrical circuits. But the quote below perplexes me. In what ...
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14 views

What's the difference between the output of an oscilloscope and the waveform I get when I record on Praat?

I know it's probably a dumb question, but is this the same thing? Thanks!
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1answer
30 views

How was phonetics performed with a phonograph?

How was phonetics performed with a phonograph? From the Wikipedia excerpt below, I guess it went something like this: A segment was recorded on a phonograph. That segment was Filtered each time with ...
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52 views

Phonetic theories of speech production

So far as I understand, earlier accounts of phonetics considered a theory promoted by Helmholtz known as the "vocal resonance account". It wasn't until the mid-40s that the Acoustic Theory of Speech ...
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2answers
35 views

Spectrograms from bandpass filters

According to Wikipedia, bandpass filters were used before the digital era began. Can anyone explain to me how they appeared or were analyzed? Spectrograms are usually created in one of two ways: ...
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1answer
43 views

Is it accurate to think of OT and auto-segmental phonology as offering explanations on how phones are derived from phonemes?

OT offers a tool to see how a surface structure is derived from an underlying one. Autosegmental phonology also allows us to see how a surface form can be derived from an underlying representation. ...
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2answers
43 views

How is the concept of formant used in linguistics different from that used in instrumental music?

Linguists use the term "formant" to refer to refer to those frequency components that e.g. distinguish one vowel from another. Typically, we refer to F1, F2, F3, and F4 and their role in determining ...
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3answers
119 views

Determining underlying representation

I'm really confused about how to determine underlying representation. Every thing I read seems to contradict the last. Trying desperately to solve this problem and I just seem to be going in circles ...
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1answer
57 views

Aside from Praat, which are the professional options for speech analysis?

I'm working as a forensic linguist at an upcoming trial. No details to share, but I need something highly professional. Praat is obviously a fine speech analysis program (and I know it well from my ...
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40 views

Armenian pH < PIE *p(H)?

PIE * p has widely become h in Armenian (e.g. հարց (harts) "question" < * prsk-, հուր (hur) "fire" < * pur-, etc.). However, some have claimed that the verb փլիլ (pHlil) "to fall in, collapse", ...
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34 views

Theoretical implications of different models of distinctive features

There are multiple models of distinctive features. Wikipedia distinguishes between three main approaches: Acoustic: Jakobson and colleagues defined them in acoustic terms,[11] Articulatory: ...
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1answer
79 views

Do languages with long clusters have minimal vowel or consonant inventories?

I assume, considering the Onset principle, that there are not many languages that have a structure with VV or VVV but are there languages that have a CV.VV structure? If there is, I would assume that ...
3
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2answers
151 views

What is the history of the International Phonetic Alphabet?

I know it has its origins in the International Phonetic Association, but the idea of a unique alphabet for each speech sound of the world's languages organized by place and manner must've had an ...
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1answer
79 views

Why are non-stop nasals so rare?

Almost every language has at least two nasal stops (usually /n/ and /m/), and a language that lacks any nasal stops is extremely rare. And yet, also very rare is any kind of nasal that isn't a stop, ...
2
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1answer
74 views

Voiced aspirated sonorants? (Not breathy voiced)

I was looking at the Wikipedia page on the Wa Language and came across something strange in the consonant table: the consonants [mʰ], [nʰ], [ɲʰ], [ŋʰ], [rʰ], [jʰ], and [lʰ]. Not only are they ...
4
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1answer
108 views

The effect of speeding up speech waveforms on formant frequencies

I understand that formants represent the resonances of the vocal tract and that the frequency of a formant is determined by the shape and size of the vocal tract. If we speed up the speech waveform, ...