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3
votes
1answer
41 views

Sound files for Lithuanian pitch accent distinctions?

I'm looking for sound files that illustrate the distinction between the two pitch contours of long vowels and diphthongs in Lithuanian, e.g. kóšė (falling pitch) vs. kõšė (rising pitch). Does anyone ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Pitch-Accent languages like Ancient Greek sometimes acquire a dynamic component. Any papers on this change?

This is kind of the opposite of tonogenesis. All languages with stress use a combination of pitch, force and duration to represent a stressed syllable. Some use only (or primarily) pitch. What ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

How are Tone and Intonation languages different acoustically?

On what aspects Tonal languages differ from Intonation languages when analyzing them acoustically? On intonation and tone: Jones (1960) - "the variations which take place in the pitch of the ...
2
votes
1answer
456 views

Difference between pitch and intensity

I would like to understand what is the difference in lignuistic betwen pitch and intensity. On the picture (taken from native HK speaker), I have a Cantonese sentence. Nei5 Jiu3 Caa4 Maa3 ? ...
8
votes
4answers
255 views

Are there documented languages that evolved from tonal to nontonal?

There is a theory about tonogenesis for the Chinese language, thus Chinese had once a more complex syllable-structure and no tones. In the course of time, the syllable structure became less complex ...
3
votes
2answers
298 views

Are there languages in which lexical pitch accent and phonemic vowel length vary independently?

According to Glottopedia, lexical pitch accent happens when the only indicator of an accent (aka stress) on the syllable is pitch--elevated pitch on the accented syllable. (http://www.glottopedia....