An informal term referring to the verbalized form of words specific to a language. Can also refer to particular individual's pronunciation, as in an accent or a pathology, or a specific speech event, as in a mispronunciation.

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191 views

What is the phonetic reason for the occurence Sun and Moon letters in Arabic?

In Arabic, letters (or more accurately phonemes) are categroised into two categories: Sun letter and Moon letter in regard to what happen if we add Al (the) to them. Moon letters don't cause any ...
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1answer
68 views

What is the cause of difference between British and American pronunciation?

I think it's pretty clear how did evolve such differences as high way or parking lot, since these terms refer to the technology that didn't exist at the age of colonization. But how, in general, do ...
2
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2answers
57 views

Is it rare for a language to contain both heterographs and heteronyms?

English has many heterographs: words that are spelled differently but pronounced the same. Examples include there/their/they're, hear/here, red/read, led/lead, etc. English also has heteronyms: words ...
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0answers
35 views

Prounciation of Ypres… in all six languages?

I know how to pronounce Ypres in both French and English, but what about the pronounciations in Flemish, Belgian, Dutch and German? How is it pronounced all six ways?
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2answers
35 views

How to save the process of your work in PRAAT?

Is it possible to save the process of your project (not a result of it) in PRAAT programme so that you can change smth later etc and do not do the same things over again?
2
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0answers
73 views

Is this letter ق pronounced almost same in Arabic and Persian?

In Persian langauge there are two letters which have same pronounciation when spelled with vowels, they are غ andق, in Arabic there is aslo a 'ق', i want to know do the two 'ق' have the same or ...
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0answers
33 views

French Pronunciation Dictionary

Is there a French pronunciation dictionary on the web like CMU English dictionary? Thanks.
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0answers
64 views

Why is the French accent so different from other Romance accents? [closed]

In terms of pronounciation, the general French accent is very different from the Italian, Spanish or Romanian ones. For example: many conventional sounds in Romance langauges (i.e. /r/ or /j/) are ...
2
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1answer
45 views

IPA: What is the significance of the “aah” after pause in pronunciations

I'm new to phonetics and confused about something when I to listen to recordings of IPA consonantal phonemes. Here is the sound for p ... ...
0
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1answer
70 views

What is the phonetic transcription of the name Jenna? [closed]

what is the IPA phonetic transcription of the female name Jenna? Is it ['dʒɛ nə], with stress on first syllable? I usually tend to use online dictionaries for pronunciation of words, but I couldn't ...
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1answer
56 views

I have a question about Arabic and Persian language?

Let me take the consonant ب for example 1. بَ بِ بُ, these three combinations in Persian pronounciaiton are ba(a in apple), be (e in bed), bo ( o in spott).But in arabic pronounciation they are ...
2
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0answers
42 views

Uvular Fricative Trill vs Uvular Fricative vs Preüvular Fricative

I'm having trouble differentiating the uvular trill, uvular, and preüvular fricatives. While I understand that the preüvular variant is more fronted, it sounds to me like many acclaimed uvular ...
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1answer
85 views

Are Lana's “Yup!”s triphthongs?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
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2answers
80 views

Where did the “ch” (tsh) shound come from in Old French

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, the Latin letter "c" was adopted in Gaul to represent both the Latin sound "k" and the Gallic dialectical sound "tsh", but later "ch" was used to represent ...
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4answers
119 views

Why givin’ instead of giving?

Why do people sometimes use givin’ instead of giving? Is it a feature of some dialect?
3
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2answers
111 views

Detailed “quality” of /ð/

I've been learning and using English since I was 10. I have always been more or less aware of the /θ/ sound, but it wasn't until I got interested in IPA notation, when I realized English contrasts /ð/ ...
5
votes
1answer
88 views

To which extent are people’s perceptions of their own pronunciation influenced by the language’s orthography?

In my experience, literate native speakers of a language tend to assume that the language’s orthography is significantly more phonetic than it actually is or, with other words, tend to think that ...
2
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0answers
84 views

“I” before, during, and after the Great Vowel Shift [closed]

The following lines are all from Byron's Don Juan. But Passion most dissembles, yet betrays Even by its darkness; as the blackest sky Foretells the heaviest tempest, it displays Its workings through ...
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1answer
56 views

carry & marry [pronunciation] [closed]

Merriam Webster's dictionary provides two pronunciations for the word carry (\ˈka-rē, ˈker-ē\ ) as well as for marry ( \ˈmer-ē, ˈma-rē\ ). In both cases, the one I hear the most is the pronunciation ...
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2answers
43 views

Stress in negative words and flap “d” in “don't”

I've learned that negative words like can't or don't are stressed in sentences. However, I've heard native speakers pronouncing phrases like I don't understand what's going on here, where don't is ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Does “d” weaken when it comes after “g” in word final position? [closed]

For example, in normal conversation, in words like engaged or encouraged, I notice that the d sounds really weak (almost unvoiced), especially when it comes before another consonant--as in We're very, ...
2
votes
2answers
114 views

Irregular penultimate stress in English words from classical sources

Wikipedia says about stress in Latinate English words: In words of three or more syllables, stress falls either on the penult or the antepenult (third from the end), according to these criteria: ...
3
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2answers
102 views

What's the reason behind the “silent n”?

My impression is that the concept of a silent "n" is quite common in many different languages/linguistic families . What is the reason that the "silent n" is so common in language as opposed to other ...
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2answers
182 views

Could you tell which pictures, which depict how the vowel chart is positioned inside our mouth, are accurate?

Ok, we all know that the vowel chart diagram is drawn like this Wikipedia Ok, that is the model, but how the vowel chart is positioned inside our mouth or how the tongue in the reality is placed ...
0
votes
1answer
86 views

How do silent letters emphasise the syllable in 'physics'? [closed]

[Source:] Silent letters may help to put weight on a certain syllable, telling the reader to put more stress on the syllable (Compare physics to physiques). [...] In English, the IPA for ...
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2answers
143 views

How Mistakes in Pronunciation Happen for native Germans speaking English

In German the sound of 'w' in the English word "wallet" does not exist. As a result, it is difficult for native German speakers to speak it any indeed many say "vallet" instead, which is the typical ...
0
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1answer
114 views

Why is 'antipode' not pronounced like 'antipodes' without the final 's'? [closed]

After I verified the pronunciation of 'antipode' (/ˈantɪpəʊd/ ), I inexplicably decided to verify separately the pronunciation of 'antipodes ' (/anˈtɪpədiːz/ ) This twofold verification emerged ...
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0answers
43 views

Schwa syncope in “hundred”

My girlfriend noticed that I say when I pronounce a word like 'hundred' it sounds like I'm deleting the schwa sound in the final syllable and pronouncing the word mroe like, "hundrd". Does this fall ...
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0answers
45 views

għ (għajn) in Maltese (Malti): modifications to following letters brought about

Maltese natives often say that the għ is a silent letter combinatipn that can alter the word that follows by either lengthening the vowel that follows (as in għada) or by inserting a vowel (not dire ...
6
votes
2answers
668 views

Confused about vowel diagram (Vowel chart)! Can you clarify & explain how to read it?

Ok, here is the English vowel chart: I'm really confused, what do "front" "central", "back", "close(high)", "close-mid", "open-mid", "open (low)" mean? Ok, Here is what I understood, please ...
2
votes
3answers
166 views

Does changing the writing system for a language change the language?

Some languages change what writing system they use. For example, Old English used to use Anglo-Saxon runes but eventually used the Latin alphabet, and Mongolian in Mongolia uses the Mongolian Cyrillic ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

The sound /Ur/ in English

I read in a book that there is a stressed version as well as an unstressed version of the sound "ər" The stressed one usually look like "ɜr" in dictionaries: hurt /'hɜrt/ her /'hɜr/ and the ...
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1answer
97 views

How do you learn how to pronounce names?

I want to learn to pronounce names without looking like an idiot. This includes having the ability to look at a name and discern its nationality, or looking at the pronunciation of a word (like as ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

Word reduction and American T before consonant

when I pronounce the phrase "It was good" in a context like this one: Person A: How was your day? Person B: It was good. I think that "was" is reduced to wəz (with a schwa sound). The only word ...
5
votes
2answers
361 views

Phonology vs phonetics : /ʁɔz/ vs [ʁoz]

It's written on French Wikipedia that the noun “rose” is represented in phonology by /ʁɔz/ whereas Wiktionary is claiming that it should be /ʁoz/. In both case, the associated representation in common ...
2
votes
3answers
99 views

Negation word and stress in English

in the phrase "It's funny", the stress is usually on the first syllable of the adjective: [ ɪts ˈfʌ ni ] But what happens when the negation "not" appears? [ ɪts nɑt ˈfʌ ni ] I'm quite sure the ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Consonants in the same tongue position

the phrase: "Sit down" phonetically looks like [sɪt daʊn]. The "t" and "d" are in the same tongue position. Can we drop the "t" in the first word in this situation in fast/casual speech? like this: ...
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2answers
140 views

Glide between the words “be” and “okay”

the phrase "It's gonna be okay" phonetically looks like: [ɪts gʌnə bɪ oʊkeɪ] There should be a glide (y) or (w) between the words "be" and "okay": ɪts gʌnə bɪ(y)oʊkeɪ, or ɪts gʌnə bɪ(w)oʊkeɪ I'm ...
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votes
2answers
67 views

Oldest words for the seasons for which we have a confirmed pronunciation?

I'm aware that this is possibly very difficult to answer. What are the oldest known words for the seasons (as major, multi-month divisions of the year) for which we have reasonable scholarly assurance ...
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0answers
65 views

How to determine and listen to rarer pronunciations?

http://the-toast.net/2014/03/19/a-linguist-explains-british-accents-of-yore/2/ http://entertainment.time.com/2013/09/20/shakespeare-the-way-it-was-meant-to-be-spoken/ Corroborate the necessity of ...
0
votes
1answer
326 views

Why is “Shanghai” pronounced the way it is in English?

Most English-language news sources and people in America pronounce the name of the city (上海) with a long a sound as in "way" within the "shang (上)" syllable, but it's not pronounced that way in ...
3
votes
4answers
146 views

Are there drawbacks for a language where every word starts with a consonant and ends with a vowel?

Would it be harder to pronounce or would it hinder the flow of speech? Would it make it harder to recognize where a word stops and where the next starts?
4
votes
4answers
290 views

Does Basque sound like Spanish, or vice versa?

I am always amazed by how similar both languages sound despite being very different in almost every other aspect. I suspect that this is a classical example of a Sprachbund, but I am interested in ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

Concerning Semitic Pronunciation of Pharyngeal Letters

So a popular theory in the pronunciation of Hebrew is that "Biblical Hebrew" (or, at the very least, Hebrew up to the point to the fall of the Second Temple and well into the 8th century CE) had ...
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votes
3answers
196 views

How close are pronunciations /ɕ/ and /x/?

I've noticed that some words starting with /ɕ/ in (Chinese) Mandarin become /x/ in some dialects. For example: 鞋 /ɕjɛ/ -> /xai/ 下 /ɕja/ -> /xa/ How close are /ɕ/ and /x/ pronunciation-wise? Does ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

What are the IPA equivalents for the special characters used to transscribe indian words?

When I try to read an article related to India (in particular indo-aryan languages) certain special characters emerge which I do not know how to pronounciate. For instance: Aṣṭādhyāyī of Pāṇini ...
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0answers
37 views

Dictionary of English Dialects

I am working on simulating what changing the English orthography (s.t. it would be (more) transparent) would do to the reading process. A natural question that arises is: If the spelling is tailored ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Name of the Armenian people/language

I once knew an Armenian girl from Yerevan and she said the Armenian people are the Hy (pronounced like "Hi, how are you") and their language is Hy-idan. However, the wikipedia writes the name of the ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

dear, ear, fear, gear, hear, near … why are bear/pear pronounced differently?

Some of you have helped me and my mum, so thank you for that. In class last week we were looking at pronunciation ... and something caught me out. Why are some words spelt very similar to multiple ...
0
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2answers
157 views

How to work with an IPA chart?

I am trying to learn French vowel sounds using this IPA chart. My question is about this chart. I use it for the first time and I am interested how comprehensive it is. Does a position at this chart ...