Consonants produced by completely obstructing oral airflow.

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0answers
52 views

Identifying place of articulation of stops in Praat

I've played around in Praat a bit trying to identify unknown syllables in Mandarin by just looking at the spectrograms. Since there is a very limited number of syllables in Mandarin (slightly over 400 ...
1
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1answer
110 views

Languages with a three-way distinction between voiced, aspirated, and unaspirated stops

I thought I had asked this question here previously but it turns out that I asked about ejectives rather than aspirated stops. So this time I would like to ask whether there are languages that have a ...
2
votes
2answers
80 views

Are voiced stops in English articulated in the same manner as their nasal counterparts before the stop release?

I have a question regarding the initial part of stop consonants in English. Let's take /b/, the voiced bilabial stop consonant, as an example. When I produce this consonant, prior to the stop ...
2
votes
0answers
115 views

Are nasals stop consonants?

Nasals: I must answer the question but I am not sure how to understand it... The question is: why nasals both can and cannot be treated as stop consonants? I thought that nasals cannot be stop ...
1
vote
1answer
218 views

Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p]?

Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p] being voiceless? Similarly, is [k] always voiceless across languages? Basically, I am taking what I know in English and wondering ...
6
votes
3answers
500 views

Are there languages with contrasting unvoiced aspirated, unaspirated, and ejective stops?

In English there are just two series of stops, voiced (b, d, g) and unvoiced (p, t, k). The latter are generally aspirated (though it depends on phonological context). In many common languages of ...
9
votes
6answers
9k views

What is the difference between voiced and voiceless stop consonants?

As a native speaker of American English, when I was listening to the difference sounds in this IPA chart, I was really surprised when I realized that I could not differentiate between p/b, t/d, and ...
16
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3answers
769 views

Why does stop VOT duration vary depending on place of articulation?

From the (albeit citation needed) section of the Wikipedia article on aspiration: Spanish /p t k/, for example, have voice onset times (VOTs) of about 5, 10, and 30 milliseconds, whereas English ...