Emphasis given to a syllable relative to other syllables.

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60 views

Word reduction and American T before consonant

when I pronounce the phrase "It was good" in a context like this one: Person A: How was your day? Person B: It was good. I think that "was" is reduced to wəz (with a schwa sound). The only word ...
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1answer
115 views

Word stress in English

Though English stress is free there are certain factors or tendencies that determine the place and different degrees of word stress. Vassiliev describes them as follows: Recessive tendency is ...
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2answers
43 views

Negation word and stress in English

in the phrase "It's funny", the stress is usually on the first syllable of the adjective: [ ɪts ˈfʌ ni ] But what happens when the negation "not" appears? [ ɪts nɑt ˈfʌ ni ] I'm quite sure the ...
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4answers
91 views

Linguistic typology of isochrony and intonation

I don't have much of a background in linguistics, and I can't tell if some of the terms I am seeing are overloaded or unique in meaning. Specifically, I've been told that language timing can be ...
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2answers
93 views

Why do these names from the Bible have these stress patterns?

In reading particularly the Old Testament, I think I note a pattern formed by many names such as: Israel, Abraham, Jerusalem, Solomon, Babylon, Zerubbabel, Lebanon, Capernaum, Zebulun, Galilee, ...
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1answer
2k views

Stress rules in English adjective-noun combinations

In English adjective-noun combinations the noun commonly carries the main stress: a big HOUSE a beautiful DOG An exception to this rule are adjective-noun combinations that are treated as one ...
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1answer
185 views

Dictionary of Georgian language with lexical stress?

I search for dictionary of Georgian with lexical stress, but i can't find online of offline. Perhaps Georgian have any explicit rules for lexical stress which i don't know?
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1answer
165 views

In languages whose syllables are of roughly equal length, how is stress typically indicated?

In languages whose syllables are approximately equal in length, how is stress typically indicated? Stress in English is typically indicated by any or all of the following: length, loudness, an ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the difference between syllable-timing and stress-timing?

From what I've heard, syllable-timed languages have syllables of equal length throughout each breath-group (i.e. bit of spoken discourse said in one breath), and stress-timed languages have ...
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1answer
415 views

Latin stress rules: exceptions

Do the Latin stress rules (antepenultimate if penultimate is light, penultimate if heavy) have any known exceptions? Also, sometimes the rule assigns antepenultimate stress to a syllable belonging to ...
6
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1answer
96 views

Do any languages have different syllable weight criteria for primary and secondary stress?

Some languages count the same syllable as "light" or "heavy" depending on the phonological process in question. For example, in Lhasa Tibetan, a CVC syllable ending in a sonorant is heavy for tone ...
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2answers
612 views

Is it common to use the minor third for calling someone?

In German, calling someone's two-syllable name is tied very strongly to the minor third. In languages that like to have a stressed last syllable, I would expect the last syllable to be higher than ...