Words, phrases, and acronyms specific to the study of linguistics.

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How can teacher embed academic language into their everyday lesson plan? [on hold]

what could be the possibility to embed academic language into daily lesson plans? reading writing any suggestions?
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What is the linguistic name of [r͡ʙ]?

I am creating a language with the sound [r͡ʙ]. The only name I can come up for this sound would be a simultaneous bilabial and alveolar trill. Is there anything more scientific than that? It cannot ...
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138 views

Is there an accepted objective criterion of “grammaticality”?

I'm not a linguist, but I took "linguistics 101" in college, and remain interested in the subject. One aspect of the linguistics field that has baffled me for years is the fact that much of the ...
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87 views

Are “part of speech” and “syntactic type” the same concept?

Are "part of speech" and "syntactic type" the same concept? If not, what are their differences?
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70 views

Differences of 'Meta-linguistic' & 'reflexive' statements

I'm currently using John Lyons' 'Semantics' vol 1. In the section 1.3 Object-language and Meta language, after he defines those concepts, he tries to show the difference between meta-linguistic and ...
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84 views

What's the difference between open/closed class words and functional/lexical categories?

These two classifications seem to point to the same types of words.
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54 views

Does the classification of languages “agglutinating” concern itself with inflectional morphology, derivational morphology, or both?

I had always thought that the terms "agglutinative" and "agglutination" referred to the typology of the inflection in a language. But on another question here there seem to be a number of comments ...
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90 views

Are Japanese honorific お and ご prefixes, particles, or both?

In Japanese there are two morphemes which are used before certain nouns as part of the honorific system: お (o) ご (go) Which terms can be used to refer to these out of "prefix" and "particle"? I ...
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64 views

Are 'reference', 'sense', 'connotation', 'denotation', 'intension', and 'extension' mutually distinct terms?

Assumptions Reference: a unique and real entity that an expression represents. Sense: a facet of a referent that an expression represents. Connotation: the settled emotional content of an ...
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48 views

Words and phrases [closed]

What word would you use to describe words and groups of consecutively occurring words, such as: the it i am it is for a in the last why did I would prefer a word that would make sense to even ...
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85 views

Head word for Synonyms and Word Families?

::UPDATED:: Dictionaries will often present a single word, and then inflected/derived relational forms (such as "house", and then provide listings for "houses", "housed" and "housing"). I'm looking ...
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341 views

What is the difference between native language, first language, mother tongue and L1?

Note: I'm not a linguist, and I realize I might be treading in a grey area here. I'm wondering what the differences (and/or similarities) between native language, first language, mother tongue and L1 ...
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L1 memories being recalled in my L2

The situation is as follows: I have been studying my L2 for approximately 4 years. I have spent a total of 10 months immersed in the L2 environment. My current stint has been for 5 months and ...
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77 views

Is this a form of ellipsis: If (you are) hungry, you should say so?

I am currently working on the following phenomenon: (1) a. If (you are) hungry, you should say so. b. He touches his nose when (he is) exaggerating. c. Where (it is) cheap, watermelon sells well. ...
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56 views

Term for homophones in tonal languages which share phonemes but have different tones?

In English we have several terms, "homonym", "homophone", and "homograph". The first one is disliked by linguists as being too vague though might be best used for words with separate etymologies ...
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101 views

What's the difference between suppletion and irregular inflection?

I've been using the two terms interchangeably. One of my assignments is asking me to identify cases of both suppletion and irregular inflection. I've been going over course notes/google to no ...
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74 views

What is the term for a noun that stands for more than one portion of an uncountable referent?

A noun that refers to one countable thing is singular. A noun that stands for one countable portion, part, or unit of some non-countable thing is singulative. See ...
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78 views

Multiple words with a single meaning

What is the technical term from a group of consecutive words with a single associated meaning? For example, phrasal verbs like: "get out" and idioms like: "on the other hand".
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118 views

Is there any difference between imperfect and imperfective aspect?

For those who came in late, "perfect" and "perfective" aspects are not the same. Perfect aspect pertains to actions that have been completed at the time referenced by the tense. So English past ...
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192 views

Accusative vs Ergative

In terms of syntactic structure, from the below grammar can we conclude that English is accusative language, not ergative. S --> NP VP VPtv --> Vtv NP VPiv --> Viv By intuition, I ...
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129 views

What are the word-order categories “Subject”, “verb”, “object” called?

Categories like "Noun" and "Adjective" can be said to be lexical categories. But what are categories like "subject" and "object" called?
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138 views

What is the difference between “Topic” and “Focus”

What is the difference between grammatical categories "Topic" and "Focus"? They are both optional, and they succeed "Force" and they both seem to stress a part of text. Rizzi places them in the ...
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154 views

Term for a non-word consistent with derivation rules

Following the example of 'take' -> 'taker, 'create' -> 'creater' and so on, we might expect that there would exist a noun '*raper' from the verb 'rape'. Instead we have the noun 'rapist'. Is there a ...
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Is there a term to denote the semantics of “the action of X”?

In English, the -ing form of verb performs multiple semantic functions; one of those functions is "the action of X". In Japanese, the -no morpheme performs multiple semantic functions, and one of ...
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91 views

Secondary articulation vs assimilation

I was teaching a linguistics class and I came across this topic "secondary articulation". It was the first time for me to hear the term. I had always known that the effect of a preceding or following ...
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86 views

What are expressions like «The Dutch have taken Holland» called in linguistics? [closed]

And does anyone by chance know any expressions of this kind in Spanish? Some others are: Queen Ann is dead. It rains a lot in England.
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115 views

Grammatical Aspects

I am searching for two special types of grammatical aspects. an aspect that has a meaning of 'try or attempt' ex: he made an attempt to ask. an aspect that has a meaning of 'eventual or definitive' ...
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138 views

What is a group of determiners called?

Verbs, auxiliaries and modals constitute the verb group (Vgp). Is there an official term used to describe a [group of determiners] (pre-, central-, post-) that pre-modify the noun in the NP? In the ...
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63 views

Literal translation with grammar notes when analyzing or describing a foreign language

I often see this kind of analysis / comparison in linguistic textbooks where they basically provide literal translation of a sentence with grammar notes (like verb tense, noun case etc.). For example: ...
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278 views

What's the difference between counterbleeding, bleeding and feeding?

Bleeding is when rule A prevents rule B from applying. But counterbleeding is when two rules are ordered too late to bleed. I see counterbleeding the same as feeding. Let's say you have some segment ...
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47 views

X after X construction?

We were given some data and the questions below. I don't need someone to tell me the answer, I just need someone to help explain what X after X construction is. It makes NO sense to me! Major ...
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3answers
220 views

What's the term for a word that can be read both as a noun and an adjective depending on where it is used?

Example: headstrong As a noun: The headstrong don't easily give up. As an adjective: The headstrong youth.
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48 views

What do you call the phrase/clause after a quotation in a novel?

Often in novels or reported speech, we have the quotation marked by opening and closing quotation mark. And before or after the quotation we have a phrase that states, <somebody> said or said ...
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181 views

What's the linguistic term for the words used when addressing someone?

What is the linguistic term for words like sir, mam, miss, pal, bro, dude, buddy, son, mom/mum, dad etc.? Although I understand that there is a fair degree of overlap, I'm not looking for the term ...
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63 views

Does lack of evidence count as evidentiality?

The "-mİş" forms in Turkish are traditionally given as examples of evidentiality: geliyor (he's coming; implies direct knowledge, generally visual) geliyormuş (he's coming; implies indirect ...
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866 views

What “category” are proper names of this kind “Debbie Downer”, “Negative Nancy” etc?

I need some umbrella term for those funny names like "Debbie Downer", "Negative Nancy", "Realistic Rita", "Chatty Cathy". Could I say that they are examples of figurative language?
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343 views

What's the difference between recursion and embedding?

Chains of relative clauses and strings of attributive adjectives are both examples of recursion--Correct? Chains of relative clauses have each non-initial relative clause embedded within the previous ...
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225 views

Does the term “(highly) agglutinating language” refer to inflecional endings, word-formation processes, or both?

I had always thout agglutinative languages were inflected languages where the inflections to a greater degree are built up by multiple affixes, each having an atomic effect. (Unlike the -s on English ...
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45 views

Is there a term for names with the “X the Y” construction? [closed]

For example, "Ivan the Terrible" or "Conan the Barbarian".
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158 views

Is there a term for a finite verb which cannot be followed by an infinitive verb, in English?

For example, the verb "enjoy" cannot be followed by an infinitive. I enjoy to eat – ungrammatical I enjoy eating – grammatical Perhaps this question relates to the area of transitivity. This ...
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140 views

Interchangeable arguments with English copula

Is there a name for this phenomena with the English copula "to be"? 1a - "My day off is Saturday" 1b - "Saturday is my day off" 2a - "John is a doctor" 2b - *"A doctor is John" I think ...
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86 views

What might “S/A-V-O” and “A/S-V-O” mean?

In looking through Google Books's preview of A Grammar of Lao by N. J. Enfield, I came across these two terms, which I'm assuming are equivalent to one another (possibly one is even a typo) and some ...
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91 views

Singular versus plural in certain locutions: Is there a name for this?

I wouldn't touch that idea with a ten-foot pole. He's a tool maker. In Germany, Catholics and Lutherans pay a church tax. The zebra stripes indicate a pedestrian crossing. He is a resident of an ...
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275 views

Quantifier (Noun Phrase + Prepositional Phrase); what are they called?

I'm having a really hard time searching for the exact term to refer to quantifiers that are of NP+PP combinations. E.g.: a lot of, lots of, a bit of, plenty of, a number of, an amount of, etc. "Basic" ...
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177 views

Is a loanword also a cognate or are the two terms mutually exclusive?

A borrowing or loanword is when a word from language A is added to the lexicon of language B, with whatever phonological adaptations are necessary. But is a cognate only a word directly inherited ...
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83 views

definition of subject [duplicate]

In Linguistics, there is a lot of talk about 'subject' (and many other things). A Linguist will say, "This is the subject of this sentence." In fact, as far as I can see, neither subject, nor ...
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62 views

What are the terms for a) the constituent before a preposition and b) the constituent after a preposition?

Consider phrases such as these: "Joe from France" "Transport of wheat" "Walking to Berlin Are there specific grammatical terms for a) the constituent that occurs immediately before a preposition ...
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191 views

What do you call an activity accomplished by other activities

Is there a term for activities which are only ever accomplished by other activities? If I were to make up a term I'd call them meta-activities. Some examples of what I'm thinking of: teaching - ...
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82 views

Using the alternatives for copyrighted zero derivation words (e.g. “LEGO”, “Xerox” [closed]

We have seen how copyright infringement goes into zero derivation English words such as a Xerox clone or He was Googling it or even A lego like construction. (e.g. ...
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133 views

Why are “first-person inclusive” forms called “first-person”?

"First-person inclusive" forms are ones that refer to both the first and second person. In that case, why call them "first-person" anything? Wouldn't it be equally logical to call them "second-person ...