Words, phrases, and acronyms specific to the study of linguistics.

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What approaches exist to categorizing kinds of passive agent markers and what are their advantages?

For my thesis I would like to conduct a study on the cross-linguistic distribution of agent markers in passives. In English, this marker is usually realized by the preposition 'by', as in (including ...
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52 views

Is there a term for words that consist of the same syllable repeated?

Words such as "mama", "papa", and "cancan" have only one unique syllable, and the whole word is just that syllable repeated once. Is there a name for such words? I am aware of reduplication, but I ...
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10 views

What terms define words that may or may not be evaluative?

Source: ... How to Reason and Argue, by Prof W Sinnott-Armstrong [At the 7 min 49 s juncture of Lec 2-8, for which Coursera neglects to provide a transcription]: It may seem to be an ...
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20 views

Single-word or multiword term for a grammatical tense marking another tense [on hold]

I would like to know if there is an English term in linguistics that expresses the notion of a use of a grammatical tense which marks (expresses) another (grammatical) tense.
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30 views

What are the blanket or general terms representing these linguistic pitfalls?

Are there collective, sweeping official terms that comprise linguistic traps such as these? Etymological fallacy Folk etymology False friend False cognate False etymology
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46 views

How distinct do two language varieties need to be in order to consider their alternating usage to be an act of code-switching?

I was recently thinking about code-switching (i.e. switching between languages within a sentence, social exchange, phrase, etc.) Would switching between dialects or accents of the same language under ...
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18 views

Does English have a common parlance demarcation between inclusive disjunction and exclusive disjunction?

Distinguishing between inclusive or and exclusive or in logic is useful. Is there already an ascribed way of using each of these operators in everyday speech in English?
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36 views

Predicate vs. Predicator

BACKGROUND According to Oxford Dictionaries Online: Predicator means "(In systemic grammar) a verb phrase considered as a constituent of clause structure, along with subject, object, and ...
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90 views

Functionalism vs Formalism?

I'm trying to really understand the difference between linguistic functionalism and formalism, but I can't find any good concrete examples of either. From what I can tell, functionalism is a sort of ...
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67 views

Is there a word for repeating the last letter of an acronym?

Sometimes I find myself noticing people saying things like […] CLI interface. Since CLI already stands for command-line interface, repeating the last letter of the acronym in its expanded form ...
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117 views

Сoncept of an attribute usesd by Russian grammarians

Note: This is cross-posted on ELL.se at Сoncept of an attribute used by Russian grammarians. I need to know all the attributes in theese sentences and how they are expressed.The problem is that ...
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243 views

Why use the term 'mood' instead of 'mode'?

Both the terms 'mood' and 'modality' have been extensively used in the English grammar. First and foremost, modal auxiliaries such as 'can', 'may', 'should', 'must' are said to represent the 'mood', ...
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200 views

What is a proper term for the contamination of a language?

Italians, for some reason, tend to accept and use foreign terms quite easily. The foreign terms that have entered and are entering common usage are mainly from the English language. Their usage has ...
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54 views

Is it common to analyze grammatically motivated vowel alternation as an occurence of discontinuous morphemes?

For example, are the triconsonantal roots in Arabic (like k-t-b --write) considered to be discontinuous morphemes? How about the English roots (s-ng -- sing, sang, sung, song) and (beg-n -- begin, ...
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Is there a term for a word's propensity for ambiguity?

The word 'excellent', in and of itself, cannot have negative connotations. The word 'exceptional', however, can have both positive, neutral and negative connotations. So one can say that the word ...
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64 views

Why are “dynamic” and “deontic” modalities so called?

It is said that there are three types of modality: deontic, epistemic and dynamic. Here are sample sentences for each type of modality: (1) You can stay as long as you want. [deontic] (2) ...
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114 views

What is the morpheme that marks a question called?

When languages have a morpheme attached to the word that makes it a question, such as a suffix, is this called a question suffix, an interrogative, suffix, etc? I don't have much experience in ...
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70 views

Is 'identity' a grammatical term?

Originally purposed for this ELL question, the following from this thread claims that which I've greyed. I ask about such a claim for English and French. [User 'RuthP' dated 2012 Dec 26:] That ...
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77 views

What is the name for this type of diagram?

When studying an agglutinative language, one sometimes encounters the following type of helpful diagram, which labels a sentence according to the grammatical function of each constitutive element. ...
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134 views

What is the difference between coreference resolution and anaphora resolution?

Is there any difference between coreference resolution and anaphora resolution? More generally, what is the difference between coreferences and anaphoras?
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55 views

Term for when sentences (or parts) are combined with “this means”, “meaning”, “that shows”, etc.?

Often sentences or parts of sentences are combined with verbs or pronoun + verb. However, they don't describe something of the content of the text, they just help to bring the parts or sentences in ...
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70 views

Is there a term for a made-up synonym or analogy to describe a forgotten word?

(I'm not a linguist, just generally interested in languages, so forgive me if I lack the appropriate vocabulary.) There are some examples here, but the general gist is that someone forgets a word (in ...
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107 views

Comparing writing systems by ease of encoding/decoding information

Considering the variety of systems of writing, the ease with which someone can receive written information in one system of writing is not precisely identical to that of any other, and I am curious to ...
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61 views

What kind of wordplay is this?

In his book Humorous English, Evan Esar gives example uses of devices he broadly labels synonymics. He writes of synonymic puns: Many a wife sends her husband to an early grave with a series of ...
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65 views

What is the meaning of zero intension?

I'm reading Possession in Yucatec Maya by Christian Lehmann (March 2003) and I came across this passage: The prototypical possessum is a concrete entity, normally an individual (as opposed to a ...
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73 views

Gold Part-Of-Speech tags

I've read this term in many papers in NLP: (Gold POS tags). what does it mean? Thanks.
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90 views

Lexical diversification

What is the precise scientific name for the following phenomenon: Spanish: Los tios = aunt + uncle English: aunt + uncle There is no single expression in English which encompasses both the meaning ...
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31 views

Adverbs vs intensifiers

Last year I had a prof who denied the existence of adverbs, and instead posited a class of words that were labelled "intensifiers". Many words that would have been otherwise been labeled as an adverb ...
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147 views

What's the difference between structural and generative linguistics?

It seems to me that generative linguistics presupposes the structuralist tradition. Are there any major differences between these two methods?
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131 views

What is the linguistic term for an environment where parents teach a second language to their children in lieu of the parents' native language?

For example, Lebanon is an Arabic-speaking country. However, many parents insist on speaking to their children exclusively in English or French and refuse or severely limit the use of Arabic. Is there ...
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109 views

Opposite of “intensifier”?

I really like apples. I don't really like apples. In sentences #1, 'really' acts as an intensifier. Using "teacher talk", I would say that 'really' softens the sentence, but I can't think of a ...
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51 views

Are there different Terms for “Synonyms” when distinguishing inflectable Words from particular inflected Forms?

I am thinking of two slightly different concepts, both of which I would refer to as synonymy. As I would like to distinguish the concepts in a text, I am looking for two distinct words. First, I will ...
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75 views

Book suggestions for linguistics for Computer Science people

I am asked to do some NLP tasks on a language which is agglutinative. I am finding these terms difficult to understand since my background is different. I am looking for some nice books that give a ...
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119 views

What is the difference between a filler word and a discourse marker?

What is the difference between a filler and a discourse marker? There are words that seem fall into both categories. The Wikipedia article on the latter is sparse and lacks examples, but what it does ...
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67 views

Is there a term for sentence ending phrases like “if that is the right word”

I'm an amateur looking for help! I talk about "heads" and "tails". Other examples of tails are "don't you think?" "do you see what I mean", "or something similar". They are phrases L2 beginners can ...
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113 views

Are different “aspects” of a Polish verb the same lexeme or different lexemes?

Polish verbs have two "aspects", imperfective and perfective, which means you use a different word depending on whether the activity you're describing is ongoing or habitual, or if it's definite or ...
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109 views

What is an affix called that is interlocked?

Wikipedia mentions 4 subgroups of affixes: prefix, the affix is in front of the word suffix, the affix is behind the word infix, the affix is within the word circumfix, the afix is separated into ...
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38 views

What is A-movement ? Can I find a short essay that can explain it?

I have been trying to get a summarized idea about A-movement. I wish you could help me out with this . Thanks
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87 views

What exactly is the SBAR label from the Penn TreeBank?

From this list of tags: SBAR - Clause introduced by a (possibly empty) subordinating conjunction. This site explains what a subordinating conjunction is. But how can you have an empty ...
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75 views

“The meaning of words depends solely on mental concepts inside the human brain”

What does "the meaning of words depends solely on mental concepts inside the human brain" illustrate? An internalist or externalist position ? Brief reason why. Thanks !
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40 views

Which grammar framework the terms “predicate/ complement/ adjunct” belong to?

From wiki, there're a number of grammar frameworks. Which framework the terms "predicate/ complement/ adjunct" belong to?
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93 views

What are phi features?

How are some interpretable and some not? Where do they come from? There is a claim that in some languages, like Hebrew, finite T can have either a 'full' set or a partial set - but how is that ...
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281 views

What is the difference between a word root and a word stem?

What is the difference between a word's root and a word's stem?
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46 views

For what reason is the term part of sentence not considered a linguistic standard?

Whenever I browse through a book on grammar teaching of a particular language, there is a good chance I'll encounter the term part of sentence. Actually, I can not remember having peeked into such a ...
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25 views

What is the name for the set of all texts expressing the same event?

suppose you want to express an event like "a man picking up an apple from the dirty floor and puts it onto the table", you have many possible ways to formulate a text expressing this even, for ...
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48 views

How do people of Southern hemisphere refer to seasons? [closed]

I wonder whether they call "winter" the December, January and February or the opposite, the June, July and August?
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32 views

What is the purpose of pertainyms?

I came across this term accidentally by reading a question on this forum. When i tried to search for it via google i only got very short definition from various dictionaries. Could you explain in ...
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57 views

What linguistic key terms are necessary to be understood in order to understand the idea behind discours analysis? [closed]

I was asked to get an understanding for what discours analysis is. As for now, this terms has no meaning to me at all, i ve tried to read about the concept in different off-and online encyclopdias, ...
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97 views

Is there a language without words which correspond to the concepts 'I', 'They', 'We'

I was wondering if a language exists without the ability to express the notions of 'I', 'We', 'they' etc. Would it be possible to communicate without these concepts being expressible as a ...
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How to find origin of a borrowed word?

For example what is the origin of name Catherine? Etymology Dictionary says that: it's from French Catherine, from Medieval Latin Katerina, from Latin Ecaterina, from Greek Aikaterine. The -h- was ...