Vibration of the glottal folds is necessary to produce voiced sounds.

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100 views

How does passing air through a narrow glottis cause vibrations?

I'm studying phonetics as part of a Linguistics degree, and in my textbook, the author discusses how we make our vocal folds narrow, almost touching, such that air passing through vibrates. This is ...
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2answers
75 views

Is unvoiced & unaspirated a category of speech?

I know there is 'voiced & unaspirated' and 'aspirated & unvoiced' categories of speech. I have heard there is a 3rd category. What is it?
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1answer
186 views

Languages with a three-way distinction between voiced, aspirated, and unaspirated stops

I thought I had asked this question here previously but it turns out that I asked about ejectives rather than aspirated stops. So this time I would like to ask whether there are languages that have a ...
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1answer
87 views

Does the initial part of voiced consonants always have a low pitch?

The spectral graphs in the accepted answer of "What is the difference between voiced and voiceless stop consonants?" shows that in English, the initial part (before the stop release) of voiced stop ...
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2answers
109 views

Are voiced stops in English articulated in the same manner as their nasal counterparts before the stop release?

I have a question regarding the initial part of stop consonants in English. Let's take /b/, the voiced bilabial stop consonant, as an example. When I produce this consonant, prior to the stop ...
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1answer
320 views

Does Mandarin Chinese have phonetically voiced plosives, fricatives, or affricates (besides “r” = [ʐ] / [ɻ])?

The various Wikipedia articles covering Standard Chinese all seem to agree that Mandarin does not have voiced plosives, fricatives, or affricates except for [ʐ] / [ɻ], written in Pinyin as "r". But ...
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1answer
185 views

Do any languages have half-voiced affricates?

While hearing something on the radio in Lisbon, I heard this phrase: A lei diz que tu não podes... (The law says you can't...) The word that interests me the most is the last one podes which is ...
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0answers
112 views

What is the nature of the (voiceless) aspirated “m” in Hmong?

Hmong is a dialect continuum spoken across several countries in Southeast Asia. One prominent characteristic is the "aspirated m" (IPA m̥ or mʰ) found in some varieties. This is the reason behind the ...
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2answers
280 views

Understanding Voiced Consonants

I've been having some trouble understanding how is it that what differentiates, for example, /p/ from /b/, is the vibration of the vocal chords, present in /b/, but not in /p/. From what I have read ...
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1answer
230 views

Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p]?

Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p] being voiceless? Similarly, is [k] always voiceless across languages? Basically, I am taking what I know in English and wondering ...
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1answer
356 views

Diachronic devoicing of initial lenis plosives in English

I get the impression that in the "classical Received Pronunciation" of English during phonetician Jones's era, the lenis plosives /b/, /d/, /g/ (and probably the affricate /dʒ/ as well) in initial ...
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3answers
443 views

Whispered Voiced Consonents

Is there a difference between voiced and unvoiced consonants when whispering, which as I understand it, does not use the vocal cords? I know it sounds silly to ask because we can all understand ...
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1answer
292 views

Can all languages be “whispered” equally well?

Watching a movie recently I found I couldn't make out the dialogue because it was all whispered. I turned the volume up, and had no problems hearing everything. It seems to me that all words are ...
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2answers
142 views

Is voicing a gradient scale?

In one online linguistics community, I read the statement that "voicing is not all-or-nothing and that it is a gradient scale." This got me thinking: is this statement true or false? I guess it may be ...
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6answers
12k views

What is the difference between voiced and voiceless stop consonants?

As a native speaker of American English, when I was listening to the difference sounds in this IPA chart, I was really surprised when I realized that I could not differentiate between p/b, t/d, and ...