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It certainly comes up occasionally, but mainly, I would think, across morpheme boundaries where one is a doubled letter and the other is that same letter but in its singular form (as in the new German orthography Schifffahrt, Balletttänzer, etc) or where a letter has both consonant and vowel values. Undoubtedly at some point uvula and any other words with uvu would in the past have been written identically until the separation of the v from u (if someone could find an old print reference to a vuvuzela then you'd have a quadruple u).

But I would imagine most languages (happy to be corrected, of course) would start to simplify spelling if the extra letters don't change pronunciation., or add in punctuation to separate them (as in shell-less in English)

It certainly comes up occasionally, but mainly, I would think, across morpheme boundaries where one is a doubled letter and the other is that same letter but in its singular form (as in the new German orthography Schifffahrt, Balletttänzer, etc) or where a letter has both consonant and vowel values. Undoubtedly at some point uvula and any other words with uvu would in the past have been written identically until the separation of the v from u (if someone could find an old print reference to a vuvuzela then you'd have a quadruple u).

But I would imagine most languages (happy to be corrected, of course) would start to simplify spelling if the extra letters don't change pronunciation.

It certainly comes up occasionally, but mainly, I would think, across morpheme boundaries where one is a doubled letter and the other is that same letter but in its singular form (as in the new German orthography Schifffahrt, Balletttänzer, etc) or where a letter has both consonant and vowel values. Undoubtedly at some point uvula and any other words with uvu would in the past have been written identically until the separation of the v from u (if someone could find an old print reference to a vuvuzela then you'd have a quadruple u).

But I would imagine most languages (happy to be corrected, of course) would start to simplify spelling if the extra letters don't change pronunciation, or add in punctuation to separate them (as in shell-less in English)

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It certainly comes up occasionally, but mainly, I would think, across morpheme boundaries where one is a doubled letter and the other is that same letter but in its singular form (as in the new German orthography Schifffahrt, Balletttänzer, etc) or where a letter has both consonant and vowel values. Undoubtedly at some point uvula and any other words with uvu would in the past have been written identically until the separation of the v from u (if someone could find an old print reference to a vuvuzela then you'd have a quadruple u).

But I would imagine most languages (happy to be corrected, of course) would start to simplify spelling if the extra letters don't change pronunciation.