All Questions

-1
votes
1answer
17 views

How to understand semelfactive aspect of a verb? How is it varied/similar to iterative aspect?

How semelfactive aspect of a verb that represents a single occasion of an event like knock,hit etc..is perfective and moment defined. whereas,iterative aspect is event that is repeated on single ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Which language has the most vowel phonemes?

Which language has the largest number of vowels with minimal pairs?
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

how to identify an abnormal hotel name?

i'm new to NLP, and i got a task that to identify abnormal hotel names which existing in database. For example, we may have hotel names like 'Hilton Hotel', 'Daisi Resort' which looks quite ...
-1
votes
1answer
20 views

What natural symbolic representations could be used for Mathematical constants?

We know mathematics is a language by itself. But to evoke any constants or any arbitrary values as such to solve anything, prior knowledge of a particular symbol and its usage must be understood. ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What is the definition of the Van Wijngaarden grammar?

I've been trying to find the formal definition of van Wijngaarfen grammars, but all I can find are either examples of these grammars or some basic overview of what it is. I need to know its actual ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

syntax tree about cleft sentences

I would like to know about the syntactic tree of cleft sentences. is the clefted elemnt moved from the original position? or Is it base-generated? I would like to knwo some referrences about this. ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Is there a connection between the Sumerian En and the Semite El?

En means lord in Sumerian and El god or deity in Semitic. Semitic peoples use the word lord as a synonym of god, it seems that the same happens with Sumerian and its gods like Enlil, Enki, Enzu etc. ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Every farmer who owns a donkey beats it - one more time on extending scope [duplicate]

Here is sentence: Every farmer who owns a donkey beats it Everyone claims that the following translation to first order logic is not correct (or maybe lacking consistency how quantifiers are ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

NLTK interface to Boxer

I came across the following code: NLTK interface to Boxer Does anybody know where I can find how to use this interface (examples) or any additional documentation?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Running C&C and Boxer

My goal is generate first order logic representation from natural language sentence. It looks combination of C&C and Boxer tools can do it. I found on reliable link to download them both: C&...
26
votes
2answers
3k views

What do you call an IPA symbol that lacks a name (e.g. ɲ)?

Some IPA symbols such as ɲ lack any name, and when I tried searching for the symbol online, the pages I got only showed palatal nasal. But I wonder what I should call it when I talk with others. Is ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

Has there been any development or long lasting influence of Leonard Talmy's work?

I've read some of Talmy's work particularly that of his semantic analysis of the spatial organization inherent in the meaning of prepositions like "across","around" or "over" among others. I've found ...
2
votes
2answers
88 views

What can we say about Classical Nahuatl <z>?

Nahuatl has two sibilant fricatives, now pronounced something like [s] and [ʃ]. The standard orthography was developed by Spanish colonizers, who wrote /ʃ/ as x, and /s/ as c before a front vowel, z ...
-1
votes
0answers
37 views

In Modern Standard Arabic, what is the correct pronunciation of the ج? [on hold]

My question is regarding Modern Standard Arabic only and I don't want to study Colloquial Arabic or Arabic dialects. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimel#Arabic_%C7%A7%C4%ABm This wiki link says: ...
-3
votes
0answers
23 views

help recruiting native english speakers for thesis research [on hold]

I am currently trying to recruit ten native english speakers (possibly monolingual) willing to volunteer in my study as informants. Basically, I'll have them perform a short written task based on a ...
-4
votes
0answers
23 views

Assistance identifying/translating spoken words [on hold]

I am requesting assistance identifying and translating an unknown spoken language. I have tried every voice translation app I could find. As well I am unsure how it is to be correctly spelled, though ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Why are “joking aside” and “six hours ago” Postpositional Clauses?

This webpage outlines the "four grammatical forms that can function as the adjunct adverbial". In the tree underneath, I agree that "aside and "ago" are postpositions, but please see the question in ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Why isn't “why you are angry” a Pronoun or Adverb Clause?

This webpage outlines the "four grammatical forms that can function as the adjunct adverbial". In the tree underneath, isn't "why" the Head? If it is, oughtn`t Adjective Clause be a Pronoun or ...
-2
votes
0answers
21 views

Text processor for transcribed sentences

I am looking for a text processor which can do the following: -I have various target sentences (e.g., I walked to school) recorded by a speaker -Different listeners transcribed these sentences -I ...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

Is 'I want it back' a raising construction?

I want it back. Semantically, it is not the direct object of the verb want but syntactically it is. Then, is this a raising construction even though it doesn't have any subordinate clause?
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Speech-to-IPA-allophones? [duplicate]

Hi I'm exploring a way to help people improve their accents. It seems that IPA allphonic transcriptions could help here -- if it's possible to get a decent language-independent transcription of a gold ...
1
vote
4answers
85 views

Which languages to learn for historical linguistics?

Which languages should one be familiar with if they wanted to get into historical linguistics? Specifically, Indo-European linguistics, reconstructing Proto-Indo-European etc. Which ones would be most ...
-3
votes
0answers
31 views

how can one say in Urdu - i am sorry for being late [closed]

i was wondering if anyone can help me understand how does one say - I am sorry for being late - in Urdu.
-3
votes
0answers
30 views

X-Bar Theory Help [closed]

I am currently taking Intro to Syntax Theory this quarter and I think my brain is going explode. If anyone could help me map these sentences with the X-Bar Theory I would greatly appreciate it! We ...
4
votes
2answers
82 views

Infinitive Marker

In English, is the infinitive marker a part of speech? I noticed that Oxford was using it in the PoS lexical entry position for one sense of "to": https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/to "...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

Italian Pronunciation Lost in Translation or regional language difference?

Sometimes the "c" such as in Tortorice and Celente are pronounced as "s" which is not according Italian rules. Why?
7
votes
3answers
131 views

Why isn't intervocalic /ŋ/ analyzed as an onset in English?

I think that sɪ.ŋɪŋ does not seem too unreasonable as a syllabification of the word singing, so I'm a bit puzzled why that option for the syllabification of intervocalic /ŋ/ seems to be dismissed in ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Chinese linguistics: Could anyone give me pointers to the Traditional-Simplified Chinese translated corpora?

I am a computational linguist and I need some datasets to evaluate my Simplified to Traditional Chinese converter. Could anyone point to datasets which have pairs of Simplified-Traditional Chinese ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Is it possible to become truly Native Level in a secondary language?

I will specify that people born into bilingual families do not count. It must be someone who started learning the language after childhood (where one's susceptibility to language is virtually cheating)...
2
votes
2answers
81 views

Are there languages without idioms?

Speakers of about any language but English agree that the idea that it may be raining cats and dogs is preposterous. But the same people do understand what an idiom is, and their own language may have ...
4
votes
1answer
60 views

Different types of color adjectives

One the one hand, Berlin and Kay found a linguistic hierarchy of colors. On the other hand, some languages have several kinds of colors. In French, color adjectives are invariable if they come from ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Different languages following the same pattern to name the same object

A drawer is something one draws out of a piece of furniture. Likewise in French with tiroir coming from the verb tirer and in Japanese 引き出し from 引く. Is there a word for such a phenomenon: several ...
3
votes
0answers
18 views

Forced Aligner doesn’t work on denoised sound file

I’m using p2fa to do aligning for a sound file. Because the speaker has some heavy breath that was misinterpreted as words, I used praat to denoise it, and it sounds pretty good. However, p2fa almost ...
-3
votes
0answers
40 views

How do birds communicate? [closed]

Many birds chirp and ducks quack among their groups. How do birds, in general, communicate with one another except for the fact they chirp.
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Describing continuity and change (like mou and mada in Japanese)

In Japanese, mada まだ refers to a continuing state: 'still (as it was)' or 'not (changed) yet', and mou もう is about change: 'already (changed)' or 'no longer (the same)'. Are there other languages ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

which formal languages rule does human language break?

This post is discussing human language and formal languages. According to the professor, human language is a kind of broken formal languages. So, which formal languages rule does human language ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Why do we write read for both present and past tense, but we pronounce them differently? [duplicate]

read verb \ ˈrēd \ read\ ˈred \ The words have the same spelling, but they are pronounced differently, and one of the words is pronounced exactly the same as a color’s name, “red,” yet its ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Homographs non-homophones

Homophones that are not homographs are common in languages like English. This arises because several letters (or diphthongs) can have the same pronunciation. But where do the (less common) homographs ...
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

Role of teaching German inflection to beginners (e.g. migrants)

As many of you know, German has gender endings on its nouns. These correspond to different cases and are governed by prepositions or verbs. German grammar is significantly more salient than English ...
6
votes
1answer
121 views

Did the removal of Chinese characters have an impact on Korean and Vietnamese?

Korean and Vietnamese used to have Chinese characters but no longer do; there has been talk (e.g. here) of doing the same in Japanese. Has there been an impact on the language? for instance changed ...
1
vote
4answers
109 views

Is there a link between the words red and bread?

While this might sound random at first, I noticed that it works in multiple languages: Danish: brød (bread) = b + rød German: Brot = b + rot English: bread (spoken language) = b + red Is this a ...
2
votes
2answers
208 views

What causes relative frequency of consonants?

So, can you point me to some research, what causes the relative frequency of consonants in various languages?The fact that vowels are more common than consonants is obviously caused by phonotactics, ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Sememe and semanteme

I'm not sure I understand what is the relationship between sememes and semantemes. I have the following definitions : A sememe is a semantic content of a lexeme. A semanteme is a unit ...
-3
votes
1answer
45 views

Research in psychiatry

My research is not linguistics pers se, it is placed in psychiatry, and my problem and question is the French etymology concerning the word psychiatry in French
0
votes
0answers
31 views

phonetics name of vibration in the wind pipe [duplicate]

A very angry, sonorant voice may have the vocal lips, wind pipe and whole throat vibrating. For example, we may see this as phoneme in e.g. imitation of a wolfs growl, "grrr", a game show's bad-...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Is there any difference between laminal postalveolar ʃ and laminal flat postalveolar ʃ˖

Lithuanian language has laminal flat postalveolar and Maastrichtian Limburgish has laminal postalveolar. Are they any different, or just the same sound
-2
votes
1answer
111 views

what does broken formal languages mean?

I am learning Stanford CS224N: natural language processing with Deep Learning. Chris said "a little bit broken formal languages" in Lecture 1. what does that mean? can any one give a concrete ...
1
vote
1answer
211 views

Is there any relationship between the Hungarian long s sound and the long s in some European languages?

This History SE question (with some references), which enquires about when the f (actually an ſ) became an s and why in English specifically, prompted me to wonder if there was any relationship with ...
2
votes
0answers
70 views

Phonetic similarity between alveolar and uvular trill

In a few languages of Europe (French,German,Italian),these phonemes are in free variation. To my ears they sound quite distinct,but maybe it is because I lack sufficient knowledge about their acoustic ...
3
votes
1answer
136 views

ODD NUMBER in Cognitive Linguistics of WILLIAM CROFT and D. ALAN CRUSE

In the subsection 4.3.4.2 The ‘odd number paradox’ of Cognitive Linguistics by W. Croft & D. A. Cruse We read: The ‘odd number paradox’ has also been put forward as a problem for prototype ...

15 30 50 per page