All Questions

0
votes
1answer
23 views

Source on approximant fortition

I'm starting a project that examines the phonetics of palatal approximant fortition (with a variety of outcomes) in several dialects of Spanish. There's a great deal of existing Spanish linguistics ...
2
votes
1answer
183 views

How Hebrew Vowels Work

I am trying to find a document that clearly explains how to apply Hebrew vowels (and what all the combining characters are for Hebrew vowels), but I haven't been able to find anything after a few ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Does 'on' mean the same as 'a' or 'à'?

unless (conj.) mid-15c., earlier onlesse, from (not) on lesse (than) "(not) on a less compelling condition (than);" see less. The first syllable originally on, but the negative connotation and the ...
-2
votes
0answers
13 views

What type of semantic shift did 'unless' undergo, when 'on less than' shifted to signify 'if not'?

unless (conj.) mid-15c., earlier onlesse, from (not) on lesse (than) "(not) on a less compelling condition (than);" see less. The first syllable originally on, but the negative connotation and the ...
0
votes
0answers
4 views

“On” is optional with time expressions, no? [migrated]

I say "I don't have any events June 1st" and "I don't have any events on June 1st" are both acceptable grammatically. The rest of the group, which includes a couple people calling themselves linguists,...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Compositional semantics without possible

Is there a way to do compositional semantics without possible worlds? Especially in the case of semantics of fictional objects. I was trying to think of fictional objects as 'grammatical object' so ...
-4
votes
0answers
23 views

Airflow obstruction in the vocal tract [on hold]

An airflow obstruction in the vocal tract provides two further criteria adopted to classify consonant sounds. Give a brief outline.
3
votes
2answers
104 views

Is there a term for the way that 'th' is pronounced differently in 'thin' and 'this'?

The point of the example in the question in the title is that, to my knowledge, there are no minimal pairs that contrast [ð] and [θ] in English, yet, if someone pronounced a word with those sounds ...
1
vote
3answers
236 views

Concept of clitic

I am trying to understand the concept of clitics. In the paper, "Feature Analysis of Danish Pronominal Paradigms with a View to a Danish Application of the Pronominal Approach", it is stated ...
0
votes
2answers
82 views

When is a thing correctly called a person? [on hold]

When does a thing become a person, in any language. When is it correct grammar to refer to a thing as a person?
1
vote
3answers
313 views

What is the language spoken in Babylon?

In the short novel "The Lottery in Babylon", Jorge Luis Borges describes an imaginary society where a Lottery decides the fate of the people, with omnipotence and foresight. At the beginning of the ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Examples of languages with complex “formules de politesse”

French uses complex word arrangements to say "best regards" and "yours sincerely" to finish well written letters, i.e.: Nous vous prions d’agréer, Monsieur, l’expression de nos sentiments respectueux ...
4
votes
1answer
85 views

What kind of verbs take three arguments?

"The man paints the wall red". The verb to paint can take three arguments, the object, the subject and the colour of the paint. What kind of verb is this? "The man colours the paper blue". I think ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Properties of movements explained by Binding Theory (principles A and C) [closed]

Could anyone please tell me what are the properties of movements explained by Binding Theory (principles A and C)? Thank you
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Verb processess

I am studying Discourse Analysis and I need to analyze a text regarding its verbal processes. Everything was going well until I saw this sentence that is burning my head completely!! : I am ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

minimal pairs for Portuguese

Does anyone know of a list of minimal pairs for pronunciation, preferably with audio files? So far the best I have found https://european-portuguese.info/minimalpairs but this is specific to European. ...
1
vote
2answers
97 views

Can we predict language death just by looking at grammar?

Is it possible to predict that a language is about to die out just by looking at its structure? So without taking into account the number of native speakers it has and other external factors? If so, ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Standardized and ambiguity-free language

Is there exist a language (the natural or the constructed one) with a completely standardized and ambiguity-free rules, and which is suitable for the modern use? I am wondering for a language which ...
1
vote
0answers
86 views

Why would French fit science, and English fit literature?

I happened upon this on r/asklinguistics that, being 9 months old, has time-barred comments. I've a shade rectified some mistakes and rewritten it. Noam Chomsky, in some interview, said that ...
3
votes
0answers
24 views

Does UG supply default values for parameters (in P&P syntax)?

Principles And Parameters syntax posited that along with some principles, there were parametric settings for certain properties, which are either "on" or "off" in a language. Examples are the "head-...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

Where does Texan English derive its l-vocalization?

My English teacher grew up in Texas and unsurprisingly her native dialect is Texan English. I noticed that when intervocalic /l/ is followed by /i/, the /l/ is elided and /y/ takes its place. For ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Origins: “have got to” [closed]

If this has already been answered, appologies. But does anyone know of literature on (or the answer to) the origins on "have got to"? Many thanks!
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Semantics of words “saw” and “with” [closed]

How to create or where to find semantic attachments for grammar rules in computational semantics for words: TransV "saw" and Prep "with" ? Is there any lexicon for this goal?
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Origin of “boor”

The Talmud frequently calls an individual a "boor". Two examples: It has been reported: If one has learned Tanach and Mishnah but not Talmud, Rabbi Eleazar says he is an ignoramus [am ha-aretz]; ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Reference request on sociolinguistical matters

I am not linguist, but I am looking for reference on the following matter: 1. Social function of language and relation of the function with other functions of language. 2. Variability of language on ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Word for naming complex phenomena

Is there a word or a (catch) phrase for naming more or less complex, mostly abstract phenomena? An example for this is the naming of the phenomenon known as serendipity as "serendipity". Reification ...
3
votes
1answer
203 views

Jargon request: “Canonical Form” of a word

I have zero experience with linguistics. Some friends told me that my question is one in linguistic, so I decided to give a shot here. Question While designing a dictionary, people collect words ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Marking phoneme boundaries - how to decide on the transitions?

I'm currently labelling some singing data, which contains very slow transitions between vowels. The data often have prenuclear glides and diphthongs together. The picture below is an instance (the ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

phoneme-level forced aligners?

I am aware of a few available aligners: P2FA, ProsodyLab Aligner, Montreal Aligner, etc. Specifically, I'm trying to use the Chinese version so I tried Chinese P2FA. It can align syllables quite well,...
1
vote
3answers
113 views

Is the distinction between phoneme and allophone useful in language learning?

IPA purpose seems straightforward to me: map all the known ways to produce sounds using the mouth to symbols and, for a specific language standard/dialect, map the possible sounds of it to these ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Grammatical case vs semantic case

I'm not sure what these terms mean. In my lecture notes I wrote that grammatical case is used to show the syntactic functions of a nominal syntagm, depending on its relation to the verb. Semantic case,...
0
votes
0answers
79 views
+50

Which semantic shift befits the legal meaning of 'consideration'?

If I had to guess from Typology by Blank (1999), specialization of meaning? Frederick Pollock. Principles Of Contract. (1902) p. 170. p. 220/400 here.         The name of ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Is there a term for mismatch between time and word order?

Is 'word order' the correct term? Does anyone know of other examples from the literary canon? I can think of merely one in English from As I Lay Dying (1930): I can remember how when I was young I ...
4
votes
2answers
210 views

Why did Canadian English remain so close to standard U.S English?

TV Stereotypes about exaggerated Canadian accents not withstanding, to me Canadian English sounds identical to standard U.S English. I can't tell English speaking Canadians from Americans with ...
2
votes
2answers
119 views

Words that signal future content

Some content words signal that future content will likely follow. The words seem to act as a typing system for instances of the content. For example: "I have an idea." --> one expects the idea to ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Sociolinguistics/Psycholinguistics: Does imitation play any role in child language acquisition?

Sociolinguistics and Psycholinguistics: Does imitation play any role in child language acquisition?
2
votes
2answers
158 views

good references for old indo-European languages

what enjoy the most is to trace back the words right to their origin. i had little study on Mazandarani(tabari\tapuri) dialect spoken is Mazandaran province of Iran. traced back some words to their ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

[?]finding roots and cognates online

im studying linguistics and i wanna know if there's an option for having several translations at once? for example, i enter "word" as an English entry and i get the below output: German: word1 word2 ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

IPA transcriptions for Norwegian

Are there online sources for Norwegian transcription? NAOB gives an orthographic one, UiB Ordbokene do not have transcription at all.
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Mapping between Uchen, Devanagari and Lantsa help

I learned basic Tibetan alphabet prior to visiting Tibet, just to realize I know only some of the characters used in practice (because of a lot of Sanskrit transcriptions that go beyond basic Tibetan)....
1
vote
1answer
124 views

Antonyms yet homophones

In Japanese, 私立 means 'private' and 市立 means 'public, city-owned', both are pronounced shiritsu. Is such a troublesome phenomenon common? Does it have a name?
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Tool(s) for Identification and annotation of discourse units in an anaphorically annotated corpus

Recently I was in need of an English anaphorically annotated corpus which now i've found and its name is Phrase Detectives Corpus. Now I'm in need of some tools names / links with the help of which I ...
11
votes
1answer
547 views

Pronoun introduced before its antecedent

I was speaking to a college-educated American woman in her 80s, born and raised in the metropolitan east coast of the United States. We were on a new topic, and without any preceding context, she ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Is interpreting a topic as subject pragmatics?

The phrases "the fire, the firefighters extinguished" and "the firefighters, the fire extinguished" both follow the same pattern, switching the place of the words, but without switching the arguments ...
3
votes
0answers
57 views

Does StanfordNLP have a problem with adverbs?

I suspect not, and I'm being dumb, but ... Usain ran quickest. is parsed (https://corenlp.run) as NNP VBZ JJS. Why JJS (Adjective, superlative) and not RBS (Adverb, superlative)? Using extended ...
3
votes
3answers
120 views

On an apparent “ masstermization” phenomenon in contemporary informal French: “ il y a de la jolie nana par ici”

I have noticed a tendency to " masstermize" nouns in contemporary informal French, I mean to use nouns as mass terms ( uncountable), though they cannot be strictly used in this way. What I call " ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Languages w/out dependent clauses

Is there a language w/out dependent clauses, i.e. one in which you couldn't say e.g. "I know that x is here" w/ a clause, where the main clause is in italic and dependent in bold (and that overlaps, ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

What is it called to derive all the implied meanings from a sentence?

What would this process of gathering the meaning of a sentence be called? What would the segments derived from the sentence be called? "John and Derrek both love cake" -> John loves cake -&...
2
votes
2answers
55 views

In case the fregean distinction between “sense” and “ denotation” is used in linguistics, what purpose does it serve in this discipline?

I'm referring here to the distinction Frege made in his paper called " Sense and denotation". A classical example is " the morning star" and " the evening star" : different senses but same ...
2
votes
1answer
127 views

Diphthongisation in varieties of English

Consider the vowel in a word like "know". The way I pronounce it sounds maybe like /nøʉ/ to me. But other Brits oftentimes think I have a foreign accent, so I don't know about that. And I am sure I've ...

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