All Questions

0
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0answers
1 view

Does short throat or stronger constriction cause a higher F3 in a vowel spectrum and why?

What factors determine the throat length? is the throat length positively correlated with the individual's frequency (male 5000 and female 5500)? Stronger constriction here means that at the place of ...
0
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0answers
22 views

Why Do We Say “The Same”?

Generally, sentences are constructed like this: Compared to Joe, he looks similar. Compared to Joe, he looks different. Compared to Joe, he looks handsome. Compared to Joe, he looks ugly. Yet, when ...
-1
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0answers
13 views

If there are cases of tense or plural as separate words like particles

I am looking for stranger particle-like things, like the Japanese wa particle, or determiners like the. So wondering if there are any cases of pluralizing or changing to past/future tense that is not ...
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

Why Creole languages aren't the default

I am new to exploring Creole languages, after seeing them compared to "Riau Indonesian": The dialect of Malay spoken in Riau Province is considered by linguists to have one of the least complex ...
-2
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0answers
21 views

Do you know what language this is [on hold]

please tell me I'm trying to figure out what language this is and where it is from
1
vote
2answers
24 views

Looking for tool to split german text into sentences

I want to train a german embedding and need to split text into sentences. That is not easy since "z. B." and "Dr." are not endings of a sentence. Does anybody know a tool to do that for german texts? ...
0
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0answers
18 views

How tone shifting actually works - How a speaker navigates the register space

In considering the ways tone might work in languages, I am looking at diagrams of 5 rows (registers I'm guessing) in which you can create tones that shift up and down the registers. Some examples of ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

What the palatalized [ʲ] means

So I'm pretty sure I understand labialized [ʷ] and some of the other superscripts, but I don't fully understand palatalized [ʲ]. An example of palatalized is Abkhaz, Selkup, Bulgarian, and Yanesha. ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

What IPA does in these complex cases

I'm trying to think of examples where the IPA symbols get really complex, and find phonologies with those symbols. I'm not quite there in understanding all the aspects of IPA, but I wanted to see if ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

How to do the Xhosa clicks

So this video explains clearly how to do the 3 Xhosa clicks at the same time as each vowel sound. The Wikipedia page also shows clearly how to produce those 3 clicks as well, independent of any vowel ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

Other languages like English whose orthography is “not quite” phonetic

Most languages it seems are pretty much phonetic. (I'm only focusing on alphabet languages, so not Chinese for example). From what I've seen, Spanish is phonetic, Cherokee too, Finnish, Inuktitut, and ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

System for intermixing IPA with Orthography

So in English the word hi sounds like /haɪ/, but can be spelled "hi", "high", etc. So if you wanted to define the word "high" in English you would have to write two things: high (the spelling/...
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0answers
39 views

Pronounce the last name Alipaz

My family name is Alipaz, however I have always wondered how to pronounce it correctly. My family has always debated quite a bit on it. It is of Spanish origin and supposedly was shortened from ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Good audio resources for the ejective consonants

I think I understand the ejective consonants, but even after listening to the Wikipedia audio clips, I am not sure I would be able to distinguish them from the corresponding "regular" consonant, like ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

In “internet Linguistics” theory, does David Crystal include sociolinguistic patterns as affecting language changes?

I'm going to discuss language changes among social sites. I'm using internet linguistics as a theoretical framework, but one of my questions related to social aspect-gender... internet linguistics ...
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0answers
51 views

Can anyone identify this language? I’ve exhausted all other search methods [on hold]

I don’t need to know what it says just the name of the language in the next 24 hours.
0
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0answers
39 views

Understanding the property of complementhood

In the following sentence: They can both speak French. How can French be the complement of the V-bar speak French? I have the following definition of the complement: A constituent X is the ...
3
votes
2answers
123 views

Why is “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani” transliterated with a Chi in Matthew and Mark?

In Matthew 27:46 (Mark 15:34), Jesus says "Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani (σαβαχθανί)", which is translated "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?". Why is this supposedly Aramaic word ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Syntax tree for this sentence [on hold]

I am trying to find best way to get a syntax tree for this sentence: Planting seeds helps you grow your farm I thought of this: -------- S1 --------- | | --...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Given both a word and the corresponding IPA, how to match/map the letters together?

Given both the word and the corresponding IPA equivalent, is there any stable algorithm for mapping the letter of each word to the IPA letter? For example, given close-quote and IPA kloʊzkwoʊt -- I'd ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

List Of Common English Syntax Ambiguities?

For an example of ambiguous syntax: John likes Adam more than Eve. Such a construction could mean that: Comparing Adam and Eve, John likes Adam more. Compared to Eve's liking of Adam, John likes ...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

Would anything bad happen if we made our alphabet represent the phonemes more accurately?

Using it to represent phones is of course bonkers, it would make much more likely for an unitary language to be split apart. When we are dealing with phonemes that problem is inexistent in my opinion, ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

How do we set comparative adverbs, from expressions like “more than x” on the syntax tree?

I'm trying to figure something out from Portuguese, but if you can answer me that based on English, it will help a lot. Thanks.
0
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0answers
86 views

What would be the true vertical boustrophedon script? [on hold]

According to omniglot and pretty much every other source I looked at (see e.g. here, here, here,...), all known boustrophedon scripts are horizontal. This includes the cases where the otherwise ...
-2
votes
0answers
49 views

*volvo* meaning life [closed]

I remember an artist in a show talking long and wide about Sweden, Ikea and their approach to life. I very distinctly remember because it concluded in a song about how life is good, featuring volvo ...
-2
votes
0answers
27 views

Question based on Syntax [closed]

In syntax, when we speak of linguistic creativity, we are referring to two very specific facts about sentences in human language. State these two facts and provide an appropriate example in each case.
6
votes
2answers
75 views

Dataset/Database similar to WALS in Vowel/Phonology

I am wondering if there is any database similar to The World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS)(https://wals.info/). In the case that it is specifically more geared towards phonological aspects of ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

What's the difference between 'concept' and 'meaning'?

Like in the title, are concepts expressed only by some parts of the speech: nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs ? In sentence: The cat ate food - all words are concepts or only the noun ? All those ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

“there” and “everything” in linguistics is a “pronoun” or “noun”?

Regarding to drawing a syntax tree, "there" and "everything" in linguistics is a "pronoun" or "noun"? For example, 1. There is an apple. 2. It is not everything.
-2
votes
1answer
96 views

Do animal names correspond with verbs that have to do with their use to humans or their observed behaviour? [closed]

In an earlier question here I used an example of animal names versus words (often verbs) that have rather similar spelling and can be linked by observations of behaviour or the functional use to ...
-1
votes
0answers
29 views

Career in Neurolinguistics [closed]

I am master in Linguistics. I want to do Ph.D in neurolinguistics, which university is best for Neurolinguistics.
-3
votes
0answers
29 views

Name for a syndrome where someone falls in love with their rescuer? [closed]

Think of a scenario similar to your classic fairytale, where a damsel in distress is rescued by the prince, and she falls in love with him. Is there a name for this as a syndrome or similar? ...
0
votes
0answers
75 views

Do English passive verbs assign case? (Government and Binding Theory)

I'm trying to think things through regarding case and passive verbs, within the framework of Government and Binding Theory. As starting point, I'll use this statement/principle (based on what I've ...
0
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0answers
42 views

Vowel Change in Europe Book

Perhaps a rogue question but my father loves languages and when on holiday in Holland was trying to tell me about the two vowel (or constant? Shifts) changes that occured, and so why English and ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

In what ways does Arabic use letters as orthographic signs without phonetic significance?

ا (alif) and و when used as orthographic signs without phonetic significance are not represented in romanization. fa‘alū فعلوا ulā’ika أوقية ūqīyah أولائك — ALA-LC guide to ...
7
votes
0answers
32 views

How similar are Talmy and Wierzbicka's theories of semantic primes?

I am an Italian PhD student in linguistics and I am interested in the analysis of the expression of Manner. I went throught the works of Lakoff, Talmy and Wierzbicka recently and their event semantics ...
0
votes
3answers
146 views

I have some questions about deciphering an ancient language

I’m very fascinated in learning new languages. I want to know: It is possible to decipher and learn how to talk in a ancient language? How to decipher at home any ancient language? Such as Ancient ...
-2
votes
1answer
39 views

Please describe the environment in which the following sounds occur and write a rule to describe the sound patterns

A made-up language used for the following examples. Please describe the environment in which the following sounds occur and write a rule (in prose or linguistic notation, whichever you’re more ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Portuguese: Inconsistencies in use of second person pronouns and conjugation

I observed that both colloquial Brazilian Portuguese and European Portuguese show some inconsistencies in the way they use the second person pronoun (or its conjugation) and would like to know if my ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Why does John Batchelor record these vowels for Ainu?

Reverend John Batchelor who recorded some early Ainu literature had a peculiar orthography, where he records word-final vowels where phonemically there is none. Words like kor or mosir, he spells koro ...
0
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2answers
59 views

If any phonologies / languages make a distinction between voiced/voiceless nasals, approximants, vowels, trills, or flaps

So there are voiced/voiceless stops and fricatives in many languages, but I'm wondering if there are the same sort of voiced/voiceless distinctions for nasals / approximants / trills / flaps / ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

How linguists determine the sounds a speaker is performing

So I see things like: Sharanawa has /ɸ/ instead of /β/, and Shanewana has a labiodental fricative /f/ instead of /ɸ/. where the table shows [β] as the symbol. That, along with other examples like ...
0
votes
2answers
37 views

If these superscripts can be considered consonant clusters

So I'm assuming the consonant equivalent of a diphthong is a consonant cluster. I'm wondering if these can be interpreted as consonant clusters. ˀm = ʔm dʰ = dh dʱ = dɦ dⁿ = dn ⁿd = nd ᵑd = ŋd ᶮd = ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

Pronunciation of Fermat in Gascon/Occitan

A math professor mentioned that the final segment of Fermat's name would probably have been pronounced [t] because of "where he was from." She didn't clarify further but I looked up where he's from ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

How to find the 'average' of a word [closed]

I am trying to extract words that are similar between several documents. I would then like to extract the 'average' of the similar words Input Document 1 Document 2 ...
-1
votes
1answer
74 views

Why do swear words mean the same thing in both English and Spanish (possibly more languages)

Earlier today, I was talking about swearing in other languages with some friends (this is a serious question, bear with me), so I decided to look up some lists of Spanish swear words for fun. This ...
0
votes
2answers
26 views

What factors can be involved and make a compensation when different heights don't make difference among vowels?

I found out the problem in my German recording. I knew I had to open my mouth a bit more when I pronounce an /e/ than in /i/, and I did so. But when I analyzed them in a spectrum, they got all ...
3
votes
1answer
257 views

Is it possible to talk about two different phonemes if they always have the same manifestations?

Both considering L1 speakers and L2 speakers. It becomes a bit tricky involving L2 speakers. While a phoneme is defined as one of the units of sound that distinguishes one word from another in a ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Etymology : Paedology vs Pedology [closed]

Pedology vs Paedology: Two words with Two different meaning completely different from one another. What is the etymology for each word?
1
vote
3answers
58 views

non-aspirated voiceless stops versus their voiced counterparts before a vowel

Is there a real distinction in say, a spectrogram, between unaspirated voiceless stops and their voiced counterparts before a (voiced) vowel? For example, /ka/ and /ga/. Are they actually different ...

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