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I found the following entries on Wiktionary (emphasis mine):

carte

French

noun

  1. card
  2. chart; map
  3. menu

card

English

From Middle English carde (“playing card”), from Old French carte, from Latin charta, from Ancient Greek χάρτης (khártēs, “paper, papyrus”).

chart

English

From Middle French charte (“card, map”), from Late Latin charta (“paper, card, map”), Latin ("papyrus, writing"), from Ancient Greek χάρτης (khártēs, “papyrus, thin sheet”).

χάρτης

Ancient Greek

noun

  1. sheet of paper
  2. book

From χαράσσω (kharássō, “I scratch, inscribe”), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰer- (“to scratch”).

scratch

English

Probably from a blend of the Middle English words scratten (“to scratch”) and crachen (“to scratch”).


I couldn't find any further etymology for scratch. It seems to me that Ancient Greek χάρτης (khártēs) is similar to Modern English scratch (e.g. a mid-point could be krats). Could these words have the same source as each other considering that the root word is hypothesised to mean scratch?

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    The etymology of χάρτης is uncertain and debated. In any case, it cannot be connected with χαράσσω, or with "scratch". – fdb Apr 12 '15 at 11:25

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