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What is the term for concepts that got translated from one language or another?

I've heard this term in a conversation about Czech Anglicisms such like: "Mějte hezký den." - the literal version of the English phrase "Have a nice day."* which wasn't really used in Czechia in the past.

It may include just randomly shared concepts as well. For example a bit – a small amount originally meant a "piece bitten off". I guess the same applies for Czech kus.

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    In general, these are simply loan words; when it's about whole phrases or idioms, you might correspondingly call them loan phrases. – lemontree Jul 15 '16 at 14:05
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A concept is actually pairing of "what it refers to" (meaning) and a word, so "cow" refers to, well, you know what, and "gabba" (a word of North Saami) refers to "white reindeer", where we use a phrase since we have no reason to have specifically identifies a concept "Whitereindeer". A better way of putting it is in terms of "expressions", i.e. some phrase in one language is used for some purpose, like "you're welcome". Your example is an example of a "calque", which is a word for word loan translation.

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  • That's what I meant! – Probably Jul 15 '16 at 15:34

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