2

I see this a fair amount in Shakespeare, where he will use phrases that are perfectly ambiguous.

One example from Macbeth: "there's husbandry in heaven, their candles are all out"

  1. There is good stewardship in the sky, the stars have all been lit

  2. There's good stewardship in the sky, the stars have all been put out before bedtime

2

It must be Antagonym, sometimes called Auto-antonym, Contranym, or Contronym.

More specifically, it is Contranym phrase.

Other examples in modern English:

  • tell me about it! (= I don't want to hear anything because I know it better)
2
  • Is it quibbling if I point out that this is single words with opposing meanings rather than metaphors?
    – fox
    Feb 10 '17 at 3:55
  • @fox, you're right, edited.
    – bytebuster
    Feb 10 '17 at 4:23

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