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Okay, so I was just doing a bit of conlanging, and I was coming up with a verb ending /æɸ/. Because of the way I have begun this, /ɸ~ʍ/ are interchangeable. When I first tried saying /æʍ]/ I accidentally rounded the /æ/, which is 100% natural and to be expected. I am currently writing this rounded /æ/ as /æ̹/--it's the only thing I can do. This rounded /æ/ is honestly the most repulsive sound I have ever heard in my life, but I like it.

I know that there are hundreds, maybe even thousands of vowels theoretically, but it seems like this one would have a general symbol for itself. I am having enough trouble finding a "complete" I.P.A. chart, as it is, with all of the symbols that have been made for the I.P.A. Any Help is greatly appreciated!

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This is the official IPA chart. As you can see, the front round vowel in that region is the open front round vowel [ɶ], the round counterpart of [a], and [æ] has no round counterpart. Note that symbols are not exact vowels, and [a] can be located in a number positions in that general vicinity (as one can see by comparing placement in specific languages, in IPA descriptions). So using [ɶ] for a rounder version of [æ] is consistent with how symbols are used (though use of [œ] probably would not be, on the assumption that the vowel is closer to canonical [ɶ] than it is to [œ].

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I've seen a ligature of (ɔ + e) being used unofficially. maybe that

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    Welcome to Linguistics! This post would benefit from adding further details. Being a one-line post, it may attract downvotes and criticism. Please edit it to add further relevant information — preferably with references to credible sources. – bytebuster Jun 14 '18 at 1:00

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