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In my grammar, 'Uber today announced a new invention' sounds fine but 'Uber yesterday announced a new invention' is marked if not ungrammatical. Any literature on this/explanations?

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  • Could you provide some more context, e.g. in which sentences you think the contrast is most striking? This will help us providing better answers to your question. Jun 7, 2017 at 12:43
  • As a native speaker, those sound equally grammatical to me.
    – Draconis
    Jun 7, 2017 at 15:24
  • @Draconis Thanks. I'm also a native (Canadian) English speaker and I'm getting some markedness on the latter
    – MJM
    Jun 7, 2017 at 15:40
  • I think both sentences would sound better if "today/yesterday" stood at the beginning or the end of the sentence.
    – fdb
    Jun 7, 2017 at 16:24
  • @fdb, agreed but wanted to discuss this minimal pair (in my grammar)
    – MJM
    Jun 7, 2017 at 16:27

1 Answer 1

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Perhaps your getting a discourse effect from an unanalyzed and assumed context. Do you interpret 'Uber yesterday announced a new invention' as either of the following:

  • *Breaking News! Uber yesterday announced a new invention.
  • *This just happened! Uber yesterday announced a new invention.

These sentences work with 'today':

  • Breaking News! Uber today announced a new invention.
  • This just happened! Uber today announced a new invention. (perhaps redundant)

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