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You fought so bravely for it.

In this sentence, the verb 'fought' is followed by two dependents: so bravely and for it.

I thought that for it was a complement whereas so bravely was an adjunct. But then, I remember hearing that an adjunct cannot come between a verb and its complement.

Does this mean that so bravely here is a complement as well? Or that an adjunct can come between a verb and a complement? Or that actually both these dependents are adjuncts?

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    This question suits more at the English language stack exchange, Linguistics SE isn't meant for specific language's grammar. Oct 7 '17 at 11:10
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    @WiccanKarnak The question is OK. The rules say "ask about any natural language from a linguistics point of view, though I accept that this question, which is fairly basic, would be better suited to ELU.
    – BillJ
    Oct 7 '17 at 11:24
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    "But then, I remember hearing that an adjunct cannot come between a verb and its complement." I think you've just found a good counterargument against that. See how many others you can find.
    – curiousdannii
    Oct 7 '17 at 15:17
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    I'd say that "so bravely" is a manner adjunct, and "for it" is a complement licensed by "fought". In my experience the 'rule' is that an adjunct cannot come between a verb and its direct object. Consider these examples: "The suitcase is most definitely under the bed", where "most definitely" is an adjunct occurring between the verb and its complement "under the bed" / "We drove directly from Boston to New York", where the adjunct "directly" is located between the verb and its complement.
    – BillJ
    Oct 7 '17 at 16:52
  • @BillJ Maybe the supposed "rule" that says 'an adjunct cannot come between a head and its complement' is applicable to NP, but is not to VP. Am I right about this?
    – JK2
    Oct 9 '17 at 5:39
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I suggest that the original unaccented phrase is

You fought for it so bravely

But since you give sentence stress to "so bravely" (raising it syntactically and thus privilege it semantically) it renders

You fought so bravely for it t_[so bravely]

This suggestion requires a theory that has some Focus or Accent etc. Phrase there above the lexical complement but below the verb. t means trace

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    Sorry but I don't get your point. Anyhow, you can put the adjunct virtually anywhere: So bravely, you fought for it You so bravely fought for it You fought for it so bravely
    – JK2
    Oct 13 '17 at 2:41
  • You say you "remember hearing that an adjunct cannot come between a verb and its complement.", your comment here and my answer provide Focused examples (you focus on that they did it SO BRAVELY) thus with deviating word order.
    – purlupar
    Oct 13 '17 at 12:15
  • @JK2 - I think this is a decisive argument for "so bravely" being an adjunct. There is much more freedom to place adjuncts than complements. Oct 14 '17 at 14:24

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