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Some grammarians classify transitive phrasal verbs into separable and inseparable. Just for instance:

Phrasal verbs that can be divided by objects are commonly referred to as being separable; those that cannot be divided are known as being inseparable.

Peter Herring, Complete English Grammar Rules

But what are the following:

  • shut somebody up
  • stand somebody up
  • tell somebody/something apart
  • talk somebody into something

etc.?

A third category: separated? Isn't it more accurate to classify transitive phrasal verbs into fixed and unfixed, for example?

P.S. Please note that I know different kinds of multi-word verbs and how to identify them as explained in this thread: Difference Phrasal Verb, Prepositional Verb and Prepositional Phrasal Verb.
My question is to do with the accuracy of classifying transitive phrasal verbs into separable and inseparable.

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  • @AlexB.: Please note that I know different kinds of multi-word verbs and how to identify them as you explained in this thread. My question is to do with the accuracy of classifying transitive phrasal verbs into separable and inseparable.
    – Mori
    Apr 12 '18 at 18:26
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    Using 'separated=obligatorily separable', you are looking at two classification schemes: (1) inseparable vs. separable=(optionally separable or separated); and (2) fixed=(inseparable or separated) vs. unfixed=optionally separable.
    – amI
    Apr 12 '18 at 20:40
  • @amI: Yes, that's exactly my point: fixed and unfixed would cover all transitive phrasal verbs, whereas separable doesn't include the separated ones.
    – Mori
    Apr 13 '18 at 2:21
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    With all due respect, that Peter Herring is not a linguist (if we trust his bio on Amazon). As for separable vs. inseparable, this distinction is most likely to be found in ESL books, not the best source if you want to read about linguistics research.
    – Alex B.
    Apr 14 '18 at 4:29

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