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How complete is their description for the Spanish language? Is it missing something out? Here is the description http://wals.info/languoid/lect/wals_code_spa

Thank You

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    I'm not familiar with Spanish, but TBH I don't think WALS can cover the core grammatical structure of any language. WALS only looks at grammatical phenomena that are of interest in cross-linguistic studies. There are many features of language that are largely historical accidents and aren't really interesting in a cross-linguistic perspective (e.g. preposition stranding in English), and therefore would not be coded for in WALS. If you'd like to know about the grammar of Spanish, an actual grammar like those cited in WALS would be much better. Jul 20 '18 at 16:22
  • It seems to be so. Thanks @WavesWashSands. Jul 20 '18 at 16:38
  • How to mark the question as answered? Jul 20 '18 at 16:41
  • @jknappen Done :) OP, you should be able to mark it now. Jul 20 '18 at 18:09
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I'm not familiar with Spanish, but to be honest, I don't think WALS can cover the core grammatical structure of any language. WALS only looks at grammatical phenomena that are of interest in cross-linguistic studies. There are many features of language that are largely historical accidents and aren't really interesting in a cross-linguistic perspective (e.g. preposition stranding in English), and therefore would not be coded for in WALS.

Based on what I've read about Spanish (admittedly not a lot), the Spanish subjunctive, for example, doesn't seem to be covered despite its importance.

If you'd like to know about the grammar of Spanish, an actual grammar like those cited in WALS would be much better.

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    Also, WALS for instance lists Spanish has having two genders. Curious, then, when I look up a word like "algo" in the DLE, its gender is listed as neuter ;-) (fully understanding Spanish grammar does involve three genders, but as nouns are always one of two, and the neuter form of adjectives lines up with the masculine, it becomes one of the finer points of grammar that even natives might not be very aware of). Jul 20 '18 at 19:17
  • @guifa Spanish is not my forte, but I was wondering why some sources might also use "neuter." How is what you call "neuter" morphosyntactically expressed in present-day Spanish, vs. masculine and feminine?
    – Alex B.
    Jul 21 '18 at 3:43
  • @AlexB. the actual form of the adjective has merged with the masculine except for in demonstratives, but its consequences are still felt as masculine singular + masculine singular = masculine plural; but generally neuter singular + neuter singular = neuter singular. Clauses and verbs (in the nominalized infinitive form) are considered neuter, along with certain pronouns that refer to non-concrete things (ello, instead of él o ella, esto instead of este o esta, etc), as well as abstract nominalized adjectives (lo bueno). Jul 21 '18 at 6:54

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