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What semantic notions underlie 'sit' and 'properness'? The following words for propriety hail from the Proto-Indo-European *sed- like

  • Spanish & Portugese sentar
  • French seoir
  • English 'sit well'

I don't know if Italian sedere or Romanian`s equivalent shifted semantically.

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    That's actually an easy one. Rulers sit, subjects stand. Those who are allowed to sit are noble, and their behavior defines propriety. A judge who is in office is said to be a sitting judge. A monarch is said to be on the throne. The pope issues encyclicals ex cathedra 'from the chair'. – jlawler Jul 23 '19 at 20:45
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    @jlawler If only I can be as shrewd as you! – NNOX Apps Jul 23 '19 at 23:22
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    @jlawler, you don't think that's an answer? – OmarL Jul 24 '19 at 8:28
  • Can you add the 'proper' meanings to the text of the question (in case the links rot). Also, wikipedia is questionable, can you give other sources (and quotes) for these 'proper' meanings? – Mitch Jul 27 '19 at 19:39
  • German Sitte "etiquette, tradition, ethos", adv. sittsam; I suppose a connection to sesshaft, "settled" (cp. gesessen, perfekt "sat") and thus civilized. Also I like to compare PIE *ses "sleep". – vectory Jul 28 '19 at 15:39
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That's actually an easy one. Rulers sit, subjects stand. Those who are allowed to sit are noble, and their behavior defines propriety. A judge who is in office is said to be a sitting judge. A monarch is said to be on the throne. The pope issues encyclicals ex cathedra 'from the chair'. – jlawler Jul 23 at 20:45

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