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I am learning the Old Babylonian language and just stumbled over the word/form pāqidūtum. It seems to be a third person male stativ singular + u + the female ending tum of the verb paqadum (to care for), but that does not make any sense to me. Does anybody have an idea?

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    No one can help you without a context.
    – fdb
    Jul 25 at 22:09
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    @fdb I wish I could add some context. its a word that occurs in an exercise (the exercise just consists of single words which have to be translated). in the chapter the stativ and suboridnate clauses were introduced so i think it has something to do with these, but i still cant determine the grammatical form
    – maxE
    Jul 26 at 0:30
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    What exercise is it? (As in, what book is it from, etc?)
    – Draconis
    Jul 26 at 2:22
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    @Draconis its on page 48, exercise A.4 of the following script assyriologie.uni-muenchen.de/studium_lehre/hinweise/… the script is in german though.
    – maxE
    Jul 26 at 8:29
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pāqidūtu(m) is the nominative plural of pāqidu(m), the active participle of the verb paqādu “to entrust etc.”

(In theory it could also be an abstract noun in -ūtu, as suggested in the other reply, but such a word, if it existed, would have merited a separate entry in the lexica. Also, the fact that the author does not introduce this suffix until a later lesson indicates that he would not expect students to know it at this point.)

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  • thank you very much! is the t indicating that it is a female nominative?
    – maxE
    Jul 27 at 11:55
  • @maxE. No. Adjectives have the masculine plural ending -ūtu instead of -ū.
    – fdb
    Jul 27 at 12:46
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The word pāqidūtum is not listed in the CAD, which suggests that it's likely not historically attested. But the word pāqidu(m) = "provider, overseer, caretaker", also included in the exercise you cited, is listed on CAD volume 12 (P) page 137.

One page 35 of the lecture notes you linked, you will also find the abstractifying suffix -ūtum, used to derive abstract terms for "the state of being something" (and sometimes collectives like "all somethings") from concrete nouns, such as šarrūtum = "kingship" from šarrum = "king" or awīlūtum = "humanity, mankind" from awīlum = "(free) man, person".

Thus, by analogy, pāqidūtum can be fairly regularly and transparently analyzed as "providership" or "the role of a pāqidum".

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