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It is known that distances (intervals) between (I could be wrong in the choice of words) "very bad", "bad", "not bad", "good", "very good" are approximately equal. Such equality of intervals was used to create 5-points scale for Semantic Differential technique (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_differential). How to find out such distances between other comparative adjective? For example, between "very small", "small", "not large", "large", "extra large"?

UPD The citation: "It was shown by Norman Cliff (1959), that next particular quantifiers to yield approximately equal degrees of intensity: +3 extremely good; +2 quite good; +1 slightly good, 0 equally good and bad or neither; - 1 slightly bad; - 2 quite bad; -3 extremely bad".

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    On what basis do you assert that "it is known that distances ... are approximately equal". I find that a very questionable assertion.
    – Colin Fine
    Oct 6 '13 at 0:02
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    "It is known" means that someone has said it definitively, and/or somebody can make money if it is believed to be true. In fact, there is no way to measure intervals based on word meanings; everybody has their own spectrum and all we know is the order, not the magnitude. Sorry.
    – jlawler
    Oct 6 '13 at 0:52
  • @ColinFine I added update point with proof.
    – drobnbobn
    Oct 25 '13 at 0:03
  • @jlawler see update point.
    – drobnbobn
    Oct 25 '13 at 0:03
  • @drobnbobn: You have added a statement which you evidently intend us to understand is quoted from a source, but have given no indication of what that source is (and there appears to be a typo in it because it doesn't make sense); and it in turn refers to another source which is not properly identified. This is not "proof" of anything. Give us a proper reference to the source of that quote, and we may be able to review it and determine its reliability.
    – Colin Fine
    Oct 25 '13 at 8:38

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