0

Technically, creating an explanatory thesaurus should require a full-blown research (either a corpus study or a research conducted on native speakers) for every synonym group to pinpoint the exact difference between them - and there's a thousand of such synonym groups in a thesaurus.

Did the authors of existing thesauruses actually do that? If not, then how did they determine the exact differences and connotations of words? And if yes, then I wonder what did they do with all the raw data and quantitative results? Because if they actually surveyed native speakers for every synonym group in thesaurus and properly analyzed the results, then each of those mini-researches should be good enough for a peer-reviewed papers of its own.

5
  • 1
    Do you mean an annotated thesaurus? full-blown research, no a. research does not take a plural.
    – Lambie
    Commented Nov 8, 2023 at 19:10
  • Lambie, I mean a thesaurus that explains the difference between synonyms rather than just providing lists of synonyms.
    – A.V. Arno
    Commented Nov 8, 2023 at 19:20
  • 1
    Dictionaries are annotated, not thesauri. Thesauri do not have exact synonyms; those do not exist.
    – Lambie
    Commented Nov 8, 2023 at 19:24
  • 1
    Lambie, a) I didn't say annotated, I said explanatory - and I'm holding a thesaurus like that in my hands right now: it's called "Oxford Learner's Thesaurus: A dictionary of synonyms". It doesn't just list the synonyms but also explains the (subtle) differences in their meanings. b) Synonyms are words or phrases of the same or nearly the same meaning, and they do exist.
    – A.V. Arno
    Commented Nov 8, 2023 at 19:38
  • annotated is explanatory. That would be the right term. From the Oxford site: No two words mean exactly the same. The Oxford Learner's Thesaurus helps you to understand the differences between similar words in written and spoken English and find the right words to say exactly what you mean. They take the meanings from a regular dictionary, obviously. That's how they are made. In this case, one of their own dictionaries.
    – Lambie
    Commented Nov 9, 2023 at 15:24

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.