From taking the synset of the word 'fantastic', I got a list of senses below:

[Synset('antic.s.01'), Synset('fantastic.s.02'), Synset('fantastic.s.03'), Synset('fantastic.s.04'), Synset('fantastic.s.05')]

What does 's' stand for?

Another example, taking a synset of the word 'fast':

[Synset('fast.n.01'), Synset('fast.v.01'), Synset('fast.v.02'), Synset('fast.a.01'), Synset('fast.a.02'), Synset('fast.a.03'), Synset('fast.s.04'), Synset('fast.s.05'), Synset('debauched.s.01'), Synset('flying.s.02'), Synset('fast.s.08'), Synset('firm.s.10'), Synset('fast.s.10'), Synset('fast.r.01'), Synset('fast.r.02')]

Again what does 's' stand for? And also what does 'r' stand for?

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I guess the NLTK documentation is a bit off. Looking at Wordnet's documents, I see:

pos

Syntactic category: n for noun files, v for verb files, a for adjective files, r for adverb files.

And in another section of the same document:

ss_type

One character code indicating the synset type:

n NOUN

v VERB

a ADJECTIVE

s ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

r ADVERB

  • 1
    Is 'adjective satellite' a term used in any linguistic theories, or is it something Wordnet made up themselves? – curiousdannii Mar 24 '14 at 3:30
  • @curiousdannii: I'm afraid I don't know offhand. – prash Mar 25 '14 at 21:09
  • @curiousdannii - adjective satellite is something Wordnet came up with - it refers to adjectives that always occur in instances relating to some other object - the canonical example is "atomic bomb". – Andrew Alexander Feb 2 '15 at 1:25

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.