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On a related question, the OP points out that the grapheme j has a variety of pronunciations throughout various languages: as [ʒ] in French, [j] in German, and [x] in Spanish. Does any other language pronounce using the voiced postalveolar affricate [dʒ]?

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  • Are you asking about spelling or about phonology?
    – fdb
    Oct 9 '14 at 11:45
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    Phonetics, I think. I want to know which languages articulate the grapheme j using the voiced postalveolar affricate.
    – Lou
    Oct 9 '14 at 11:54
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    I think you are asking which scripts use the grapheme "j" to represent the phoneme [dʒ]. That is a question about orthography, not phonetics.
    – fdb
    Oct 9 '14 at 11:57
  • Surely they're two sides of the same coin. I'm either asking which writing systems write [dʒ] as j, or which phonologies pronounce j as [dʒ].
    – Lou
    Oct 9 '14 at 12:06
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    No, they're not two sides of the same coin. A language may have several different orthographies, or none, without affecting its phonology (or phonetics). I suspect @fdb is pressing the point, as I would, because non-specialists often confuse a language with its script.
    – Colin Fine
    Oct 9 '14 at 22:55
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'J' stands for /dʒ/ in Indonesian, Somali, Malay, Igbo, Shona, Oromo, Turkmen, and Zulu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J

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    All, of course, in imitation of English spelling. Until recently Indonesian used "dj" for [dʒ], following Dutch orthography, before adopting the English-based orthography of Malay.
    – fdb
    Oct 9 '14 at 11:47
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    @fdb -Yes, but the question was about the names of languages, so here they are.
    – Yellow Sky
    Oct 9 '14 at 11:54
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    Are you suggesting that [dʒ] was an English "invention", @fdb? If you're willing to provide more context on this, it would make a great answer.
    – Lou
    Oct 9 '14 at 11:55
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    Are you sure of that, John? I thought it generally represented a voiced palatal.
    – Colin Fine
    Oct 9 '14 at 23:00
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    @tepples - Russian distinguishes [ʑ] from [ʒ:].
    – Yellow Sky
    Oct 12 '14 at 7:14
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In some Romanizations of Armenian, "j" is used for the letter ջ, which is pronounced [dʒ] in Eastern Armenian, or for ճ, pronounced [dʒ] in Western.

These Armenian letters are also sometimes transcribed (especially in older texts) using "j^", i.e., "j" with a hachek instead of a dot. In this case, the regular "j" (with a dot) would be used for the sound [dz], as represented by ձ in Eastern and ծ in Western. (Incidentally, I don't know of any other case where "j" has been used to represent [dz], but for some reason it was chosen in this case.)

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