Linked Questions

16
votes
3answers
2k views

Are word classes universal?

I'm working on an application that takes a special database of words and its word class and determines the such from a given sentence. I'm now working to see if word classes that are found in English ...
7
votes
5answers
360 views

Why are there such things as 'time adverbs'?

Words like yesterday, today, and tomorrow are defined as adverbs. However, an adverb is a word modifying an adjective or verb (or another adverb). Words such as yesterday do not seem to modify ...
-1
votes
3answers
2k views

Specific English word classification

I'm looking for a maximum subset of the English language such that words can be divided into two categories, one of which must include at least nouns, proper names, adjectives, numerals, verbs and ...
4
votes
1answer
689 views

Do all languages have the same set of grammatical relations?

As for parts of speech, I am quite sure it is not the case. For instance, some languages are problematic in separating clearly verbs from adjectives like Japanese and Korean, some native American ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What is a determiner?

I asked a previous question related to this one about parts of speech. I need to figure out what a determiner (DT) is in Penn Treebank Tag Set. In the set examples found in the tag set, it appears ...
5
votes
2answers
374 views

Multilingual POS tagging set

As you know: Almost all languages have the lexical categories noun and verb, but beyond these there are significant variations in different languages. We want tag POS of some text of a lot of ...
2
votes
2answers
198 views

Given all the languages that have ever existed, is there a limit for different parts of speech?

I was told here several times, that a part of speech is not universal, but specific for each language as much as the A,T,C and G's are in everyone's genome. Nethertheless, occasionally the same terms ...
3
votes
2answers
416 views

What's the difference between particle, marker and adposition?

The three lexical categories (or parts-of-speech) particles, markers, and adpositions are extremely vague to me. Some grammars call marker what others call particle or adposition. For example, the ...
5
votes
2answers
157 views

What is the name of this class of grammatical modifiers?

In French (and many other languages), adjectives and pronouns have different classes, e.g.: Adjectives demonstrative indefinite interrogative numerical possessive Pronouns demonstrative indefinite ...
3
votes
2answers
116 views

How do you analyze a standalone hashtag like “#goals”?

For those not fluent in internet-ese, the semantics are something like "The subject under discussion has an aesthetic I want to emulate"; if I saw a picture of someone wearing an outfit I like, I ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Terminology around non-word, but word-like, structures

In traditional linguistics literatures there is a clear separation between words and non-words. Words are basically what you'd find in a dictionary. But in todays world you find all kinds of word-like ...
4
votes
2answers
72 views

Reference on corpus annotation schemes

I wonder whether there exists some general reference on corpus annotation schemes. I looked at two of the main NLP textbooks [1-2], but they don't seem to have any chapter focusing on it. Yet, the ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Is there an accepted symbol for the word or concept “symbol”? [closed]

Is there a standard symbol that could be used to indicate that an item in a text is to be considered as a symbol or graphic component rather than a semantic component? For example: to indicate that ⺘...