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An accent is a manner of pronunciation peculiar to a particular individual, location, or nation.

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Why is the English phoneme /θ/ pronounced like /t/ in Indian accents but /s/ in Chinese accents?

The dental fricatives (/θ/ and /ð/; spelled with th) often present a challenge to non-native learners of English. Depending on the speaker's native language, different phonemes may be substituted. In ...
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Correct to say that accent defines the mapping between phones and phonemes?

I'm trying to become acquainted with the language (hah) of linguistics (specifically speech perception, from the perspective of auditory signal processing), so that I can write and converse about the ...
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What is the pronunciation of English word “feeling” in General American accent? The normal sound [ˈfilɪŋ] or add the “l” sound, [ˈfiɫ lɪŋ]?

What is the pronunciation of English word feeling in General American accent? The normal sound [ˈfilɪŋ] or double the "l" sound, [ˈfiɫ lɪŋ] ?
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Do natively bilingual people have accents in one or both of their languages?

Do people who grew up speaking multiple languages typically have a discernible foreign accent in one or more of their primary languages? Also do they tend to make the kinds of mistakes that non-...
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Why do Americans and Canadians pronounce “t” with flap [ɾ] in unstressed syllables in English?

Most Americans and Canadians pronounce "t" with flap [ɾ] in unstressed syllables. Why?
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71 views

Phonetically annotated speech corpus

Are there any phonetically annotated corpora of accented English speech? Preferably English spoken by native English speakers with a strong accents, such as speakers from a specific region in the UK ...
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58 views

Is plumminess pharyngealization? Plus: Deaffrication

You’ve all heard the phrase “plummy accent” and many variants of it. I’ve been trying to find out how can this be called or described in more scientific and phonetic terms. So I bumped onto John ...
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57 views

Is accent prejudice well-established in film/television hubs other than Hollywood?

In US films and television, characters with a British accent are typically smart. Characters with a deep south accent are typically foolish or uneducated. And characters with a Scottish accent are ...
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Conflation of language dialects and phonology

The main idea behind this questions is that I have some difficulty to accept that a certain language can be a dialect of another one by simply basing that argument on the similarity of the vocabulary ...
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71 views

Is it possible to not only lose/gain an accent, but also lose some fluency in native language? [duplicate]

Pardon the awkward phrasing in the title, but I am essentially wondering about the following scenario. A person, Alice, grows up bilingual, speaking languages A and B. She lives in a country C in ...
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28 views

Can regional variations of a language cause the formant space to be reduced?

I'm doing research on speech, but I'm not a linguist. Hopefully it won't be a silly question. I have been reading a little on regional variations of formants, because in my research we use formant ...
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154 views

Why do speakers of certain East Asian languages chop off the end of English words?

I've noticed that often, when speaking in English with native speakers of certain East Asian languages, they tend to skip consonants at the ends of words. I'm wary of providing examples out of a ...
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185 views

Is it possible for an adult to learn a language without carrying a foreign accent?

As an adult, I'm working on learning French, coming from a background growing up speaking a few languages natively. According to French friends of mine I practice with, I have a "good" accent, but I'...
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175 views

How to differentiate an East Anglian accent from a West Country accent?

I want to understand the East Anglian accents better (Norfolk, Suffolk etc) but can't seem to differentiate it from a West country accent (Devon Somerset, Cornwall) properly. What linguistics ...
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53 views

Accent of babies crying. Is there research other than for German and French?

In the first days of their lives, French infants already cry in a different way to German babies. This was the result of a study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and ...
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2answers
138 views

How is it possible to reconstruct old accents of a language?

I just a video of a guy who delivered the opening lines of Romeo and Juliet in the modern received pronunciation of (British) English and then the same lines in what he claimed was the original accent ...
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194 views

Minimal Pairs Highlighting the Difference between American and British English

Does anyone have a list of minimal pairs, highlighting the difference between American and British English? Thanks.
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267 views

Are there common traits of foreign accents across languages?

A foreign accent is obviously influenced by the native language of the speaker. What I'm wondering is if there's been any research on common traits of foreign accents across languages, that one could ...
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108 views

Do speakers with heavy accents find it easier to understand their own accent than a more standard accent?

As a speaker of a fairly standard North American English accent, I occasionally find it difficult to understand people who speak with a heavy accent. I've always been curious about what exactly makes ...
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116 views

Do sign languages have “accents” like verbal languages?

Do sign languages have "accents" like verbal languages? If so, what would be some examples of those?
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66 views

Phonetic/ phonological description of 2nd gen Chinese accent

Quick question, and perhaps a natural extension of some of my previous questions. For the girl speaking here at 1:09, what phonetic and phonological characteristics of her accent, and how do they ...
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233 views

Corpus for Asian American Accents?

I'm looking for a corpus of Asian American accents so that I might parse them and determine what phonetic/ phonological differences differentiate them from other American accents. By Asian-American ...
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1answer
192 views

Best phonetic/ phonology resource for learning accents?

I'm a non-native English speaker at a California university absolutely fascinated by the variety of English accents I encounter in my day-to-day life. I have a co-worker with a Singaporean accent, for ...
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How fast do people lose their accents and regain them?

If a child was born in for example India and moved to America around age 5, but still spoke their native language at home what age would they lose their accent? And then maybe when they are 12 they ...
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Pitch-Accent languages like Ancient Greek sometimes acquire a dynamic component. Any papers on this change?

This is kind of the opposite of tonogenesis. All languages with stress use a combination of pitch, force and duration to represent a stressed syllable. Some use only (or primarily) pitch. What ...
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397 views

What is the difference between Silesian Polish and neutral/standard Polish?

I would like to know what are the distinctive sounds of Upper Silesian Polish. Not the dialects, but the regular official language spoken by an upper silesian person with his regional accent. Do they ...
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Influences on the accent of Georgia (the American state)?

The accent of (most of) the American state of Georgia, as far as I know, lacks the drawl of most other Southern American accents. Instead, it is quicker and clipped. Does anyone know why? Does the ...
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317 views

Losing a non-native accent of English [closed]

I realize this question has been done to death in other contexts, but I have already exhausted the possibilities covered in similar threads all across the web. I am a fluent (I hold the Certificate of ...
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1answer
81 views

Accents and dialects

How are dialects formed? Are they always a diverging branch from the main language or can they be the fruit of a converging process between different languages because of cultural pressure? Also, ...
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266 views

What gives rise to racial accents? (timbre)

As a native speaker of English, it is almost immediately obvious to me when a speaker is Native American or Black. I find the difference is most obvious in men, I find, but even setting aside ...
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If someone grows up bilingually, with what accent will they speak a third language they learn as an adult?

If someone grows up bilingually (say, a Mexican-American who's a native speaker of both English and Spanish), and they learn a third language (say, Mandarin), what accent will they speak it with? (Or ...
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287 views

We have constructed languages, but are there constructed accents?

I know people have created languages like Esperanto or Ido to make languages that have desired characteristics. Obviously then people have spent a lot of time creating these languages from the ground ...
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What accent (for the English language) is most widely and easily understood?

I am making educational videos (in maths, science, etc.) that I plan to put on YouTube and perhaps elsewhere. I am hoping to reach as wide a global audience as possible. Obviously then, if there is ...
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1answer
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Is there a phrase for someone being ashamed of, or self-conscious about their accent when moving to another region?

I was reading a book about accents at a local library and there was a chapter where the author says "some varieties of a language are more aesthetically pleasing than others". Some accents are ...
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The verb BE as function word or content word

I'm reading a book on America accent and there's a page with exercises. Exercice: Circle the function words in the following sentences: The sky is blue. ... ... The answers are provided at the end ...
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Is diphthongising [ʌ] as [ʌɪ] novel or an accent feature?

I have noticed some speakers diphthongising [ʌ] as [ʌɪ]. For example, in Bea Miller’s Young Blood, she pronounces “young blood” as [jʌɪŋ blʌɪd] and “us” as [ʌɪs]. Has this been documented elsewhere? ...
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Is Anglo-English more diverse in terms of accents than, say, French (in France)?

Ignoring English outside England for the moment, does English have more variation in its accents than other languages do? To put this practically but unscientifically, is it more difficult for ...
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Negation word and stress in English

in the phrase "It's funny", the stress is usually on the first syllable of the adjective: [ ɪts ˈfʌ ni ] But what happens when the negation "not" appears? [ ɪts nɑt ˈfʌ ni ] I'm quite sure the ...
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1answer
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How distinct do two language varieties need to be in order to consider their alternating usage to be an act of code-switching?

I was recently thinking about code-switching (i.e. switching between languages within a sentence, social exchange, phrase, etc.) Would switching between dialects or accents of the same language under ...
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220 views

What characterises Hebrew spoken by native English speakers?

I was watching episode 8 of Srugim's third season and noticed, beginning at approximately 19:50 (at least in the Hulu upload), this very minor character whose Hebrew sounded weirdly "off" to me. From ...
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1answer
213 views

Why do French/German speakers round [ð] to /z/ while Italian/Hebrew speakers round it to /d/?

More generally, what factors determine which phoneme a non-phonemic foreign sound gets rounded to in a specific language when there are multiple possibilities available? Is the choice always ...
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133 views

IPA for English: British or US standard?

I often see IPA representations of words (e.g in Wikipedia) that render the American accent of English (instead of British). Is there any agreement on which English accent IPA should render or does it ...
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Is there such a thing as standard text for learning accents?

I've been trying to learn accents and have been fortunate enough to make friends in some of the countries I want to emulate. I was wondering if there is a standard block of text containing all the ...
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1answer
257 views

What is the cause of the epenthetic ‘r’ in ‘warsh’?

Why does this ‘r’ appear only in ‘wash’ and ‘Washington’ without analogous examples? That is, why does this ‘r’ not also appear in similar constructions (like ‘posh’ (which is never pronounced ‘parsh’)...
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1answer
128 views

Fastest way to learn accents for English native [closed]

What's the fastest way for an American English native to learn other accents, specifically the Boston accent and Received Pronunciation? Books? Audio clips on the web? If so, what books, and what ...
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271 views

Are there any linguists out there to help identify country of origin from syntax?

I've come here in the hope that there may be some genius amongst you who could have a fair crack at identifying a potential country of origin through speech pattern. On the Movies&TV stack, we're ...
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Accents resources?

What are some good beginner's introductions to accents? In English (accents, I mean, generally; but English sites or books)? At this moment I'm primarily interested in accents on the level of the ...
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145 views

Different accent for different genders and age groups

Probably due to a desire to sound cute or otherwise I find teens (girls mostly) using an accent wherein they have to pout their lips a bit more in speaking while this may give them a more appealing ...
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191 views

Native Urdu Speakers saying “I'll I'll” when speaking English

I have a number of Indian colleagues who are fluent in English (but Natively spoke Urdu or Hindi) and I've noticed a trend to stutter the word "I'll" when they speak it, as in: I'll I'll look into ...
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Bostonian Accent

While I am no linguist I do teach language as an element of culture to my middle-schoolers and as we are located near Boston, the "Pahk the Cah in Havahd Yahd" question often comes up. The kids want ...