Questions tagged [adjectives]

Words that describe or modify a noun or noun phrase.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-1
votes
0answers
42 views

“Hot summer” and “White sky” [closed]

If there is hot air in summer, we call it “hot summer.” Likewise, if there is white clouds in the sky, can we call it “white sky”?
1
vote
2answers
85 views

Linguistic term for using masculine adjectives in front of feminine/plural nouns for emphasis in a language that has grammatical gender

Adjectives in languages that have grammatical gender have to be in agreement with the nouns they modify. In Classical Arabic, however, some adjectives were commonly used in their base form (masculine ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

What are the pros and cons of having adjectives appear first?

In the English, we say: Red apple Red is an adjective. apple is a noun. Red tells us that, well, the apple is red. In other languages, such as Arabic, it is the other way around. I.e.: تفاحة ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

If adjectives denote functions of type <<e,t>,<e,t>>, then what denotation of *be* will allow adjectives to appear in predicative position?

Suppose [[gray]] = λf ∈ D<e,t> . [λx ∈ De . f(x) = 1 and x is gray]. Since this function is of type <<e,t>,<e,t>>, it would seem that sentences like Julius is gray are ...
8
votes
3answers
527 views

Did Proto-Indo-European put the adjective before or behind the noun?

Did PIE put the adjective behind the noun (like Romance languages usually do) or before the noun (like Germanic languages)?
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Are these “phrases” or “clauses” before a noun a modifier adjective?

In these clauses or sentences "I love those "I love you" messages" or "I hate those "I love you" messages", Is this "phrase" or "clause", &...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

What do you call the range of possible subjects a word can be predicated of

What do you call the range of possible subjects a word can be predicated of? i.e., brown can be predicated of furniture but not numbers; running can be predicated of people but not rocks; fruitless ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Origin of describing emotions with adjectives associated with taste

You might have seen that most of the adjectives that are related to taste are used to describe emotions. Salty, sour, sweet, bitter etc. We use these adjectives to describe people and their emotions. ...
-2
votes
1answer
113 views

What does Potrefená mean in Czech? [closed]

There is a restaurant chain in the Czech Republic called the Potrefená Husa. Husa in Czech is Goose, but I can't find a meaning for Potrefená in any of my usual sources (Google Translate, dict.cc, ...
3
votes
1answer
84 views

Pronominalized adjectives in Lithuanian

This is a question for those who are native speakers of Lithuanian or have a very good proficiency in Lithuanian as a second language. As for your feeling, are the definite or pronominalized ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

Historical development from adjective to concrete noun to more abstract noun

I'd really appreciate any knowledge or advice on further reading about the following. Excuse my naivete- I am at the start of this investigation. I'm studying an historical corpus and I have found a ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

Are there any studies on marked adjective order in the NP in head initial languages like Spanish or Albanian?

For example, Spanish unmarked NP order is Noun-Adjective ("libro rojo", "casa grande"). However, there are many situations where the order is reversed ("un rojo atardecer", "es un buen libro", "tienes ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Is there any language that has different morphology for individual-level and stage-level adjectives?

For example, the language might be such that a a stage-level adjective like "available" would agree in predicative position, but an individual-level adjective like "intelligent" would not.
0
votes
1answer
72 views

What grammatical features should we assign to the Danish superlative forms -st and -ste?

When entering Danish lexemes into Wikidata, I have been unsure which grammatical features one should assign to the Danish superlative forms "-st" and "-ste" for adjectives, e.g., in bedst and bedste. ...
5
votes
2answers
196 views

Adjective position in Provençal (Occitan)

Can anyone tell me the rules for adjective position in Provençal? I know that, like most other Romance languages, most adjectives go after the noun, with some exceptions. But I can't find the exact ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do adjectives come before nouns in English?

Why does the attributive adjective come before a noun in English? In most languages, the adjective comes always after a noun. For example, white car is written as the equivalent of car white in Latin ...
3
votes
0answers
76 views

Does StanfordNLP have a problem with adverbs?

I suspect not, and I'm being dumb, but ... Usain ran quickest. is parsed (https://corenlp.run) as NNP VBZ JJS. Why JJS (Adjective, superlative) and not RBS (Adverb, superlative)? Using extended ...
0
votes
2answers
204 views

The Grelling-Nelson Paradox

The following excerpt is from Godel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas Hofstadter. Divide the adjectives in English into two categories: those which are self-descriptive, such as "...
4
votes
1answer
80 views

Different types of color adjectives

One the one hand, Berlin and Kay found a linguistic hierarchy of colors. On the other hand, some languages have several kinds of colors. In French, color adjectives are invariable if they come from ...
0
votes
0answers
77 views

Name for adjectives modifying the verb within a noun rather than the noun itself (as in “illegal immigrant”)

I'm interested in the phenomenon where people object to "illegal" as though it is inaccurate because the person implied by "immigrant" cannot be illegal in merely being a person. While moral and legal ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Is there a database which tags the “high/low” sense of comparative adjectives?

For example, “faster” is “high” (speed) whereas slower is “low” (speed). Similarly, "longer" is "high" and "shorter" aligns with "low".
4
votes
1answer
137 views

Is gradable vs absolute a universal distinction?

Inspired by multiple questions on ELU and in particular this recent question about 'correct', I wonder whether French has the similar concept of gradable vs absolute adjectives. The idea is that some ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

Past Participial Relatives are the sourse of Participial Adjectives, why?

I came across this statement in a work (Ph.D. Dissertation, p.158) by Asier Alcázar Estela in which he assumes that the Past Participial Relatives are the source of the Participial Adjectives. And he ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

Is “bien décidés” an adjectival phrase?

Mais il me faut quelques volontaires bien décidés. in that sentence, décidés is considered as an adjective right? So does the phrase bien décidés an adjectival phrase or adverbial phrase?
1
vote
2answers
166 views

Triggering emotions with language

Emotional responses to certain words is often argued to be a result of nurture(acquired through development), while emotional responses to Tone is largely attributable to nature(born with). Shouldn't ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

Terminology for chained, nested adjective anatomy

For the moment I am just considering adjectives and adverbs as the same sort of thing, basically modifiers for the noun or verb. I will probably only focus on nouns here for simplicity. Some examples ...
2
votes
3answers
128 views

Are there languages where the imperative of “to be” (as in “be happy”) is non-existent or achievable through vastly different means?

I know many languages don't have the word "to be" (e.g. Hawaiian), but I don't know how they form "to be" imperatives. I'm not asking specifically about Hawaiian, though that is welcome as well. ...
6
votes
2answers
709 views

What is the syntax of “second” in phrases like “the second most common problem”?

In English, words like "second", "third" etc. (also "next", I guess) can be used with a superlative to count down from the maximum. Some dictionaries call "second" an adverb in this context (e.g. MW, ...
0
votes
2answers
353 views

Stolen, part of speech

I've checked several dictionaries for the word "stolen" only to find it labeled a verb. Virtually all of the examples sentences use it in a manner that I would have considered an adjective: "The ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Infinitive clauses referring to an adjective before a noun [closed]

We know that infinitive clauses can sometimes refer to adjectives before nouns. I feel with what adjectives they can do that, but I don't have any reason for it. Examples; You can buy the best book ...
0
votes
0answers
60 views

Are there languages which have ways to distinguish between an adjunct noun and an adjective?

(Take some example). Do other languages (than English) have means distinguish between their adjunct nouns and adjectives or is it a very complex/grammatical structure that cannot possibly be ...
0
votes
1answer
684 views

A concept called extreme-opposites

I am novice in linguistics but I have a keen interest in natural (spoken) languages. There is this concept in my mind called "extreme-opposites" or "extreme-antonyms". The concept goes like this: ...
3
votes
0answers
95 views

How can be these two types of adjective distinguished terminologically?

In adjectives there are two main groups: First Group: adjectives that their 3 grades (base, comparative and superlative) are changed whether regularly (nice > nicer > nicest) or irregularly (good > ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there a technical term for the kind of adjective A which appears in sentences of the form 'The object O is A.'?

Question. Is there an attested technical term for the construction 'Object O is A.' where O is a noun and A is an adjective? Remarks. The phenomenon that I am hoping to read about, and find a ...
1
vote
1answer
171 views

Is there a term for an adjective or noun becoming a verb, like “to adult”?

Is there a term for a word that is traditionally an adjective or noun becoming a verb over time? A word I'm thinking of is "adult", which Merriam-Webster has reported has become increasingly ...
5
votes
2answers
137 views

Has there been cross-linguistic work on differential adjective-noun order?

In recent years, a massive amount of attention in linguistics has been devoted to the variation within language varieties of grammatical structures caused by semantic and discourse-pragmatic factors, ...
1
vote
2answers
348 views

What is the part of speech of 'modifiers to adjectives'?

This is something I was just thinking about. Adjectives in a lot of languages can also take modifiers of their own: very big, more intelligent, etc... But is there an actual word for the part of ...
2
votes
0answers
73 views

Data/Resource for adjectives related to nouns

I am looking for resource or some way(maybe using multiple resources) which can help me figure out which adjectives to use. For example: weight > 40 : heavier age > 40 : older I am not sure how to ...
3
votes
1answer
327 views

Case assignment with prepositions

Consider these examples: 'I am happy with my parents' my parents gets assigned Case by 'with'. *'I am proud with my parents' My question is as follows: What is the reasoning for 2 being ...
1
vote
1answer
954 views

What is the x-bar tree of 'I am proud of my students'? (having trouble with proud)

I am having trouble attaching the 'proud' to the 'am'. 'Am' is a verb and 'proud' is an adjective for the noun 'I', so should come as an adjunct for 'I', but here it would have to somehow come from ...
1
vote
2answers
133 views

Where can I find a lexicon of adjectives?

I am currently looking for a list of adjectives that I can use as a seed for a machine learning model. These do not need to be annotated. Are there any open source lexicons that exist which could be ...
3
votes
2answers
123 views

Term for -ed as an adjectival suffix?

By which I mean changing a noun into an adjective by adding '-ed'. For example: the noun 'horn' becomes the adjective 'horned' Is there a term for the type of adjective that is formed from a noun by ...
4
votes
2answers
148 views

How is the the adjective in a definite noun phrase different from a nondefinite one in Germanic and Balto-Slavic languages?

In the wikipedia article about definiteness I came upon this: In the Germanic languages and Balto-Slavic languages, for example (as still in modern German and Lithuanian), there are two paradigms ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Do other languages than English have verbals ,too?

As I understand it, verbals are nouns,adjectives and adverbs which are derived from verbs. I don't understand if a verbal is indeed one of the three parts of speeches mentioned or a part of speech of ...
0
votes
0answers
106 views

Is “down at the bar” an adjective phrase or adverb phrase?

There are three parts of speeches attributed to "down" in the dictionary: adjective, adverb and verb. I understand , that at the bar is a sub phrase and a prepositional phrase. I don't know the rules ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Can adjectives be concrete in an ontological sense? [closed]

Hello everyone, I'm trying to further define adjectives such as "beautiful" in an ontological sense. Can any adjectives which denote abstract OR concrete nouns, be concrete? Can "beautiful" be an ...
2
votes
0answers
158 views

Type of adjective, “more” vs. “less” [closed]

Does Linguistics group adjectives by their nature to denote an absolute quantity, as opposed to those that denote a relative quantity? If so, are there terms for such adjectives pointing out this ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Governors of adjectives in dependency grammars

In some dependency treebanks for Germanic languages, nouns in subject position are assigned the governors of their corresponding predicative adjectives, as opposed to the copular verb connecting the ...
4
votes
3answers
180 views

What is it called when one “conjugates” adjectives?

If one conjugates verbs and declines nouns, what is it called when an adjective is "conjugated," as it is in French to agree in gender and plurality with the noun? (E.g. "beau" is masculine singular ...
2
votes
0answers
58 views

How do I distinguish between traits and states using NLP?

In an English sentence: Harry was displeased. – displeased is a state Harry was benevolent. – benevolent is a trait Given an adjective, how can I distinguish between a trait and a state? The ...