Questions tagged [adjuncts]

An optional part of a sentence, clause, or phrase that, if removed, will not otherwise affect the remainder of the sentence.

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“Peter sang a song to Julie”, Is “to Julie” is an adjunct or complement?

Peter sang a song to Julie. It seems that the verb "sang" selects the preposition, but to Julie is optional. And if we apply it to an X' Schema, how shall we do it? To Julie is the dependent of sang ...
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How to differentiate between adjuncts and complements? Specifically when the sentence has two prepositional phrases [duplicate]

When a sentence has 2 prepositional phrases, how I can determine whether the second prepositional phrase is a complement of the first prepositional phrase or it's an adjunct to the whole sentence? ...
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Are there languages which have ways to distinguish between an adjunct noun and an adjective?

(Take some example). Do other languages (than English) have means distinguish between their adjunct nouns and adjectives or is it a very complex/grammatical structure that cannot possibly be ...
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“He kept a black book in his desk.” Is “in his desk” an adjunct or a complement?

The verb "keep" can be used with a direct object and a prepositional phrase, as in the following sentence: He kept a black book in his desk. What is the grammatical role of the PP "in his desk"? ...
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Adjunct domain and Argument domain

I am attempting a problem with anaphora resolution. I need help with some terms in the Lappin and Leass' paper. In the paper, it is mentioned A pronoun P is non-coreferential with a (non-...
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Does an adjunct really “modify” something?

In most grammars, an adjunct is differentiated from a complement in that the former modifies something whereas the latter complements something. But is it really the case that what an adjunct does is ...
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You fought so bravely for it. [adjunct vs. complement]

You fought so bravely for it. In this sentence, the verb 'fought' is followed by two dependents: so bravely and for it. I thought that for it was a complement whereas so bravely was an adjunct. But ...
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781 views

complement vs adjunct

She's a teacher working at a public high school. Now, you can say either of these: (1) She teaches at a public high school. (2) She works at a public high school. Is the prepositional phrase "...
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What's the name of the elements used to extend otherwise basic clauses?

Given the following sentence: "He wrote a love letter at night for his girlfriend". "He wrote a love letter" is the basic SVO clause, but what is the "at night" and "for his girlfriend" part called? ...
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A Question About Complement and Adjunct

I am a student of English syntax and I have a question about complement and adjunct. In this phrase the strong influence of Latin upon English I would think that the PP 'of Latin' is an adjunct, ...
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Which word is the head of the phrase “somewhere there”?

Robocop's catchphrase is somewhere there is a crime happening If the sentence was just a crime is happening it would be unproblematic for me: a crime would be a noun phrase in the function of a ...
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Do nonfinite (adverbial) adjunct clauses have to be controlled?

Some examples of nonfinite adverbial clauses: Susan left me [without having said goodbye] [Being a trained boxer] Cathy always forces Mark to his knees with ease [Green with envy] John ...
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Adjunct vs disjunct [closed]

What is the difference between an adjunct and disjunct? How can I distinguish between the two? Please, I will be very thankful if you give me some examples.
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Classification of adjuncts in preposition phrases

In the sentence "the mad cow jumped right over the moon", the adjunct 'right' modifies the preposition 'over' in the preposition phrase 'right over the moon'. As the adjunct 'mad' to 'cow' is an ...
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Syntactic Tree help [closed]

Draw the syntactic tree for the deputy’s recent discovery of incriminating evidence; for full credit, you must put all specifiers, all complements, and all adjuncts in triangles & Draw the s-...
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What is the difference between complements and adjuncts?

What is the difference between complements and adjuncts? I always have a problem drawing a tree diagram for the syntax structure of a sentence with placing complements with word level category and ...
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“He left the room angry” Is this a resultative adjunct?

He entered the room drunk. He left the room angry. I have heard that both drunk and angry are the examples of what is called resultative adjuncts. Is this correct? What does the term mean?