Questions tagged [adverbs]

A class of words that modify the meaning of a verb, adjective, another adverb, clause, or sentence. Examples in English are "quickly", "often" or "today". Not to be confused with adverbials (sometimes also called "modifiers"), which may consist of a group of words and not necessarily of adverbs.

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19
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1answer
2k views

What is the idea behind calling the adverb the garbage can of words?

As chance would have it, I came across three unrelated persons each describing the adverb as the the garbage can among the word classes. It happened in Germany and the original wording was: ...
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What really makes adverbs different from adjectives?

I just tried to answer a question that amounted to knowing whether adverbs can be inflected. Then, doing a bit of search for examples, I came up with the impression that, in many cases, I could not ...
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350 views

Are there languages in which adverbs inflect?

Are there any languages in which adverbs (in the sense of verb modifiers) inflect to match the verb they modify?
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570 views

Does any language conjugate adverbs?

Many definitions of adverbs, like those in Polish grammar theory, state that adverbs are an invariable part of speech (they do not conjugate with verbs) in opposite to adjectives, which decline with ...
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Is the word "here" a preposition?

In a related question, I got entangled in a debate whether the word "here" (which I would classify readily as an adverb) is in reality a preposition. I am curious which modern analyses find ...
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692 views

Are there languages that inflect adverbs for gender

Triggered by this answer, I am curious: Are there languages that inflect adverbs for gender or noun class? I have consulted the following two questions but the given inflections of adverbs in their ...
6
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847 views

What is the syntax of "second" in phrases like "the second most common problem"?

In English, words like "second", "third" etc. (also "next", I guess) can be used with a superlative to count down from the maximum. Some dictionaries call "second" an adverb in this context (e.g. MW, ...
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Adverbs as NP pre-modifiers

I would like to ask about the syntactic analysis of adverbs as what is called "peripheral noun modifiers" in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p436, which is illustrated in the following ...
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229 views

'Ago' and 'on' vs. 'in'

Consider the phrase a month in in the following sentences: [1] a. Richmond turned nineteen his third week in Vietnam. A̲l̲m̲o̲s̲t̲ ̲a̲ ̲m̲o&...
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Did the Greek adverb for "late" evolve into a preposition meaning "after"?

The Greek work opse meant late in Homer. By the time of Philostratus (3rd c. A.D.) it sometimes had the meaning of too late. Of course, if someone arrives too late for an event, they arrive "after" ...
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Split-INFL Hypothesis and X-Bar Theory

According to the Split-INFL hypothesis, the subject of a sentence moves from the specifier of the predicate to SpecTP to satisfy the EPP and lastly to SpecAgrSP to obtain NOM case. Is there any reason ...
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Is the adverbial phrase and adverb phrase identical?

context I understand there are different theories of grammar. There is the a set of traditional pragmatic grammars aiming at teaching languages, which might not even have names for themselves. Then, ...
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What kind of phrase is "until recently"?

I learned about prepositions: they establish a relation with two words the preposition is followed by an object -the object of a prepositional phrase is made by a noun phrase However, I don't know ...
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What part of speech is 'two o'clock' in this sentence? [closed]

I thought adverbs didn't modify nouns but then what's going on in these sentences: It is nearly two o'clock We were there for nearly an hour The town is nearly forty miles from here
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267 views

Why can verbs with imperfective morphology have a perfective meaning?

Some languages, e.g., Russian (1), Bulgarian (5) or Greek, show perfective readings of morphosyntactically imperfective verbs: (1) Jakov ezdil na more dvazhdy za poslednij god. J. rode.IPF ...
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359 views

'Before'/'after' as a spatial metaphor: is the opposite possible?

In English (and, apparently, most Indo-European languages, if not in all), a common trait can be noticed concerning the prepositions/adverbs of temporal reference: 'before' and (to a lesser extent in ...
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218 views

Could certain adjectives or adverbs be analysed to function as a type of copula in Mandarin Chinese?

Chinese (I've only had experience with Mandarin so far) has at least one or two equivalents to English to be, such as "在" (zài) and "是" (shì). Now I know that Chinese adjectives are actually verbs so ...
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263 views

NPs as adverbials; how to parse them?

NPs can function as adverbials as in the following sentences: I ran a mile. I am 5 feet tall. One way to confirm this is by substituting the NPs with adverbs, e.g. "I ran fast" and "I am very tall". ...
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107 views

Antecedents of prepositions and adverbs

It seems that some prepositions and clausal adverbs have antecedents while others do not – for example because and therefore require antecedents, while in and clearly do not. I was wondering whether ...
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Aside from English clause adverbs, are there other suborders?

A suborder is a set of related expression elements which are more strictly ordered with respect to each other than they are with respect to other expression elements. This is my own term. I offer ...
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Does StanfordNLP have a problem with adverbs?

I suspect not, and I'm being dumb, but ... Usain ran quickest. is parsed (https://corenlp.run) as NNP VBZ JJS. Why JJS (Adjective, superlative) and not RBS (Adverb, superlative)? Using extended ...
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Particles and Words Affixing Heads and Phrases

In Malay, there are quite a few words and particles that can affix or modify both heads and phrases. The interrogative suffix -kah is one of them. -Kah affixing heads Tidak-kah sakit kecederaan ...
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The Syntax of 'Only'

The adverb 'only' is known to be able to come in a variety of positions. The following examples demonstrate that it may be generated in positions that aren't so simple to syntactically analyse. The ...
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1answer
129 views

What are the pros and cons of having adjectives appear first?

In the English, we say: Red apple Red is an adjective. apple is a noun. Red tells us that, well, the apple is red. In other languages, such as Arabic, it is the other way around. I.e.: تفاحة ...
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Which word is the head of the phrase "somewhere there"?

Robocop's catchphrase is somewhere there is a crime happening If the sentence was just a crime is happening it would be unproblematic for me: a crime would be a noun phrase in the function of a ...
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416 views

Is it sensible to ask for the lemma of an adverb?

Is lemma defined for adverbs? For example, what is the lemma of diagonally? An even more difficult example would be "What is the lemma of nationally?" Is it nationally, national ,or nation? Or lemma ...
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336 views

Colloquial use of adjective that is actually acting as an adverb -- examples or formal use?

In a song by rap group NWA they say this: "The bitch sucked one hell of a dick" Disregarding the potentially offensive nature of the quote, it stood out to me that although "hell of a" is an ...
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Why does the Georgian adverb მწარედ (mtsared) "bitterly" end in -ედ rather than -ად?

According to the materials I possess or can find on the Internet, Georgian adverbs derived from nouns end in -ად (-ad) (unless the noun in the nominative ends in -ო (-o) or -უ (-u), in which case the ...
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230 views

AdvP Merged in Spec XP or Adjoined to XP

Radford (2011) merges AdvPs in the specifiers of the phrases that they modify. What are the advantages of such an analysis over augmented XPs (AdvP adjoined to XP)? If I'm not mistaken, specifiers ...
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614 views

X-bar: Put 'Where' in a Determiner Phrase or in an Adverb Phrase?

I'm currently working on an introductory guide to X-bar Theory for a group of students, and was wondering whether to classify a specific part as a Determiner Phrase or an Adverb Phrase. I have ...
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What has been written about English completive "up"?

English up can be used to express completion or thoroughness: eat it up 'eat all of it', beat him up 'beat him thoroughly'. What research exists on this construction, from any angle (syntax, ...
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Difference between particle and adverb in English

Some dictionaries such as Cambridge Online Dictionary defines the word particle as a word or a part of a word that has a grammatical purpose but often has little or no meaning: In the sentence "I ...
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1answer
80 views

Is there a term for words that modify the intensity of something

Is there a term for words such as very extremely likely super , which modify the intensity of something? Obviously these are all adverbs, but yesterday is also an adverb, and that does not change the ...
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383 views

What is the part of speech of 'modifiers to adjectives'?

This is something I was just thinking about. Adjectives in a lot of languages can also take modifiers of their own: very big, more intelligent, etc... But is there an actual word for the part of ...
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200 views

Phrases and clauses used as an adverb, and hence don't take a preposition

He had been in precarious situations his entire life. I know here in this sentence his entire life is used as an adverbial phrase and, hence there was no need of placing a preposition before that ...
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1answer
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Why can interrogatives so often be used-as/made-into intensifier adverbs?

Why does the ability to take normally interrogative words like "what" and "how", and turn them into intensifier adverbs, seem like such a language universal concept? In Japanese, you can take the ...
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Looking for time adverbs & frequency adverbs lists in english

I'm a linguistic student and I'm looking for a reliable source (Scientific paper, dictionary or even reliable internet website) which lists time adverbs & frequency adverbs in English. Anyone can ...
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Analysis of adverbial phrases composed of NOUN and NOUN

There is a certain adverbial pattern composed of "[NOUN] and [NOUN]". We work day and night. It's raining cats and dogs. They're arguing / going at it hammer and tongs. I've seen that &...
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1answer
175 views

Characterising adverbial constructions

I know adverbs are multifarious, but I’d like to find out just how farious they are. I’m trying to work out what properties they can have by looking at variations in the way different ones can be used....
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Are there languages which restrict adverb usage to only one of either preceding or following a verb?

We have adverb sentences like this: I basically initially ran quickly. That means the same thing pretty much as: I basically initially quickly ran. First part of the question is, why do some ...
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Bare-NP Adverbs in German

There is a special class of noun phrases in English that have the ability to function as adverbial modifiers, unaccompanied by a preposition or any other indicator of adjunct status. These are the so-...
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-wise, -mente, -ment: How many languages use the "mind" metaphor for adjectives made adverbs?

When I noticed that English, Spanish, Italian, and French use the "mind" metaphor to turn certain adjectives into adverbs (not all, cf "-ly" from English). That is, as it was explained to me by a ...
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1answer
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Do other languages than English have verbals ,too?

As I understand it, verbals are nouns,adjectives and adverbs which are derived from verbs. I don't understand if a verbal is indeed one of the three parts of speeches mentioned or a part of speech of ...
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Is "bien décidés" an adjectival phrase?

Mais il me faut quelques volontaires bien décidés. in that sentence, décidés is considered as an adjective right? So does the phrase bien décidés an adjectival phrase or adverbial phrase?
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Formal semantics (Montague, type-theoretical) of adverbial clauses

Partee has nice summary about the formal semantics of relative clause http://people.umass.edu/partee/MGU_2005/MGU05Lec10.pdf (subordinate adjectival clause). E.g. At least one boy who Mary loves is ...
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adjectives and adverbs functioning as prepositional complements

what kind of adv and adj are these? what is prep. complement. Can you give ma a couple of examples of adj. and adv. which may function as prepositional complements?
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301 views

Describing continuity and change (like mou and mada in Japanese)

In Japanese, mada まだ refers to a continuing state: 'still (as it was)' or 'not (changed) yet', and mou もう is about change: 'already (changed)' or 'no longer (the same)'. Are there other languages ...
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Does an adverb either modify verbs (not adjectives and adverbs), or modify adjectives and adverbs (not verbs)?

From Manning's Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing: Adverbs modify a verb in the same way that adjectives modify adverb nouns. Adverbs specify place, time, manner or degree: (3....
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What do features ±F and ±N mean?

Could anybody please help me understand what the [±F] and [±N] features mean? What do they stand for, I have no idea .... (The article elucidates in terms of GB theory) Given these observations, ...
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Is "down at the bar" an adjective phrase or adverb phrase?

There are three parts of speeches attributed to "down" in the dictionary: adjective, adverb and verb. I understand , that at the bar is a sub phrase and a prepositional phrase. I don't know the rules ...