Questions tagged [affricates]

Single phone consisting of a stop phase followed by a fricative phase.

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5 votes
1 answer
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How to present affricates in onset consonant clusters

When an affricate is included in the onset of a word e.g., the Polish /ɡd͡ʑi/, is this a CCCV or CCV structure? Following this, when putting it into a syllable tree, would the affricate be two ...
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How to find a "burst quality" in a spectrogram?

What is the "burst quality" in a spectrogram? So for the example I provided from praat what would be the burst quality for the affricate shown below? Is it similar to a plosive?
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2 votes
2 answers
143 views

How did the j get the dʒ sound?

The j getting the dʒ is very weird, how did the letter j get the dʒ sound? Why not a /j/ sound as in "yes"?
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2 votes
0 answers
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Is there a standard(-ish) definition of affricate aspiration/VOT?

Is the frication of an affricate considered part of its aspiration? Or does the aspiration start at the end of the frication? And does voice onset time (VOT) measure aspiration (as defined by the ...
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0 votes
2 answers
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Languages that have phonemic aspirated post-alveolar affricates

There are loads of languages that have voiceless post-alveolar affricate, tʃ. I am aware of languages that have phonemic voiceless plosives (e.g. Mandarin), but I am wondering if there are any ...
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4 votes
3 answers
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What do you call double consonants that are not affricates?

For example, the IPA Help page for English lists these consonants: hw whine lj lute nj new sj consume θj enthuse zj Zeus Is there a name to refer to this type of double consonants? I'm thinking &...
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2 answers
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How many morae would an affricate in the position of a coda have?

Would it have two, because it's technically two phonemes, or one?
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7 votes
1 answer
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Affrication-like sound in palatal plosive [c]

When I compare the plosive sounds in an IPA table with recordings (like this or this), the sound of [c] stands out to me as noisier and more turbulent than the rest of the series [p, t, ʈ, k, q, ʔ]. ...
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4 votes
2 answers
816 views

Aspiration of Voiceless Affricate in English

My qiestion is about the voiceless affricate ch( CHair, maTCH, baTCH, strucTure) as it is used in ENGLISH: English has two affricates: the ch in chair and the j in jar. The ch is a voiceless ...
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  • 49
2 votes
2 answers
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Wellsean Syllabification and Recapitulation Symbols in the LPD

Those of you who deal with phonetics and phonology of English, and perhaps other languages as well, will surely have read John C. Wells’s article “Syllabification and allophony”, which you can find ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Relation between VOT and three way distinctions between plosives and affricates

I faced this puzzling Fill in the Blank which asks- VOT can make a three way differentiation among i.____________________ ii. ________________________ iii. _____________________plosives and fricatives....
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1 answer
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A question about /t/ + fricative /r/ vs /tr/ affrication

So in most accents of English, /r/ is fricated when it follows /t/ and /d/ word-initially, and in some it has become a full affricate /tʃ/. If you were going to look at a spectrogram of this, how ...
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4 votes
1 answer
668 views

Do any languages have half-voiced affricates?

While hearing something on the radio in Lisbon, I heard this phrase: A lei diz que tu não podes... (The law says you can't...) The word that interests me the most is the last one podes which is ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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What is the syllable structure of a word with an affricate in the onset?

If a word has an affricate in the onset, let's say /ts/, along with another consonant, let's say /k/, to make a word like /tski/, is the phonotactic syllable structure of this word CCV or is it CCCV?
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12 votes
4 answers
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Why are /t/ and /d/ sometimes affricated before /ɹ/ in English?

I saw a post on ELU about a more general question, Softened pronunciation of consonants, such as “t” or “s” followed by “y”. The question was answered in regard to palatalization, especially for ...
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30 votes
5 answers
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Is there a difference between an affricate and a plosive+fricative consonant cluster?

Is there a difference between an affricate and a plosive+fricative consonant cluster? According to wikipedia, there is a difference between a plosive+fricative sequence, as in the following example ...
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