Questions tagged [agglutinative-languages]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Analytic vs synthetic verbal constructions in Turkish

It is well known that Turkish is a pretty synthetic language. However it allows numerous analytic constructions with auxiliary verbs etmek, yapmak and others. For example fark etmek means to notice, ...
user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
65 views

Is there any solid evidence for the agglutinative->fusional->analytic->agglutinative roundabout?

I've heard it mentioned that languages tend to evolve in a kind of merry-go-round pattern where a language that's agglutinative slowly turns fusional, that fusional language's inflections slowly break ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
71 views

What is the most synthetic popularly spoken language?

Among languages with large numbers of speakers (let's say something like >5 million), what languages are the most synthetic? I can find Swahili and Turkish are good examples, but are there even ...
user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
1 answer
348 views

How a learner of a polysynthetic language like Arapaho would use an electronic or printed dictionary?

Along the lines of this question about agglutinative dictionaries, I just finished reading through the paper "Creating lexical resources for polysynthetic languages — the case of Arapaho, by ...
user avatar
  • 3,399
3 votes
3 answers
120 views

Roots categorization

I'm computationally working on an agglutinative language, a morphological analyser. The thing is that roots can form verbs (not all) but some roots like lüg 'white' is classified as Adjective if it is ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
302 views

How do Agglutinative Features/Languages develop out of Fusional Features/Languages?

Does anyone know about the development of agglutinative languages out of fusional languages, or, more precisely, agglutinative features out of fusional features? I am thinking in particular about the ...
user avatar
  • 133
2 votes
2 answers
248 views

Could have inflected Proto-Slavic really 'been created' as a lingua franca among some Slavs and many agglutinative, Turkic languages-speaking peoples?

In my experience, it seems to be that people learning as a second language one that is significantly more inflected that their mother tongue(s) experience serious difficulties and tend to avoid ...
user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
505 views

How agglutinative languages affect comprehension

I am just learning about agglutinative languages so I don't have much experience with them. I am looking at longest words for example words in a language like Finnish, but not sure yet if those would ...
user avatar
  • 3,399
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Do linguists ever learn another language just to increase their own knowledge of linguistics?

I've been thinking about doing just that. I've been looking at agglutinating languages like Korean and Hungarian. Problem is, I've never managed to truly learn a language unless I had a use for it. I'...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
927 views

Turkish voice to text speech recognition references

Does anybody know what is approach implemented in Google Speech API and Siri for Turkish voice to text speech recognition? I'm interested in details of these two services, not the general or ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
115 views

Is the difference between analytic and agglutinative languages superficial? [duplicate]

Say you have a theoretical language which has verbs that are never inflected. If that verb appears, it will only appear in one form. Tense and such things are marked with particles that follow the ...
user avatar
  • 117
6 votes
2 answers
1k views

Are fusional languages easier to learn than isolating languages?

As some of you may know, auxlangers tend towards isolating languages. At the very least, the direct object is determined by word order rather than with a case ending (mostly because most West ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
274 views

Is there a dominant sequence in which a language throughout its evolution changes its type?

To clarify, by type I refer to terms like isolating, agglutinative,flectional...I think the terms which Humboldt introduced for a rough categorization. Now, I heard of languages, that changed their ...
user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
5k views

difference between Isolating (analytics) vs inflected (fusional) vs agglutinative languages

It's not easy to grasp these concepts. I spent a lot of time perusing wikipedia articles but still can't really understand what makes a language: inflexed, isolating or agglutinative, Background ...
user avatar
  • 1,141
7 votes
2 answers
770 views

Are there right-branching agglutinative languages?

The major agglutinative languages like Turkish and Japanese are also notable for being almost strictly left-branching, much more so than, say, English is right-branching. Is it a coincidence, or is ...
user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
268 views

How frequent are different morphosyntactic types?

I started wondering what share of all world's languages are polysynthetic (on any practical definition of polysynthetic, i.e. the prototype approach, the macroparameter theory (Baker 1995), etc.), and ...
user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
349 views

Statistic data on average morpheme-to-word ratios

I wonder whether there is any statistic data on morpheme-to-word ratio of certain languages. Is this something that can be and has been measured? The languages I am most interested in are the ...
user avatar
  • 1,000
3 votes
2 answers
13k views

What is the distinction between agglutinative languages and polysynthetic ones?

My understanding of morphology is that a word is taken and many different words are glued to it. Is not this true for both agglutinative and polysynthetic languages? Or what is the finer level of ...
user avatar
  • 735
3 votes
1 answer
673 views

Are there any languages besides Japanese which are both inflecting/agglutinating and do not indicate word boundaries in writing?

Many languages have inflectional or agglutinating morphology - they have words with multiple or many forms due to aspect, degree or comparison, gender, mood, number, tense, etc. A number of languages ...
user avatar
  • 14.2k
7 votes
3 answers
571 views

Across agglutinative languages are there tendencies for morphemes to occur in certain orders?

In agglutinative languages there are normally roots for nouns and/or verbs that can have multiple morphemes attached as affixes, following certain rules, to add information such as tense, aspect, mood,...
user avatar
  • 14.2k
11 votes
2 answers
1k views

Agglutinative vs. Analytic. What's the difference?

First of all, I understand that these typological distinctions are not absolute and almost all languages show signs of almost all morphological strategies but most display a certain tendency towards ...
user avatar
  • 2,145