Questions tagged [assimilation]

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How can I tell the difference between types of assimilation?

I am currently studying linguistics (new to the subject) and I have a challenging time understanding the different assimilation forms. So far we studied these: Assimilation of voicing only (place and ...
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How did Gothic "𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌱𐌰𐌷𐍄𐌹" (andbahti) become Medieval Latin "ambasiator"?

I found the following etymology of the word "ambassador" on Wiktionary. From Middle English ambassadore, from Anglo-Norman ambassadeur, ambassateur, from Old Italian ambassatore, ...
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Is /v/ cross-linguistically semi-voiced and powerless in devoicing preceding consonants in case of regressive assimilation? How to explain it?

In Danish, /v/ is semi-voiced, like a combination of [f] and [v], though /f/ does exist in Danish phonology. Russian features general regressive assimilation of voicing, but this rule doesn't apply ...
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/ðæs saɪd/ versus /ɡʊb bɔɪ/ - Assimilation of place versus manner

Good day I am facing a problem to distinguish between assimilation of place and assimilation of manner So in Peter R's book he said that (AOM) is much less noticeable, and he provided examples which ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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The reason for a partly voiced hold in I’d

In I’d take ’d t can be pronounced as [t] with the first part of the hold voiced (the second one and the plosion with aspiration are voiceless). How is it better explained: is it because of [ai] (...
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2 votes
2 answers
367 views

Does assimilation of voice produce different phonemes, or just allophones?

During assimilation of voice, voiced consonants become voiceless and vice versa: s - z, d - t, etc. cats ([ts]) dogs ([ɡz]) missed ([st]) whizzed ([zd]) Are these sound pairs different phonemes, or ...
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2 votes
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Sandhi vs Assimilation?

Sandhi is a common Linguistic feature in many languages, which happens at word boundaries. Assimilation is feature progressively/regressively affecting the other segment boundary. ðɪs ʃɪp becomes ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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How did French take over Walloon in Belgium?

Wikipedia states the use of Walloon has decreased markedly since France's annexation of Wallonia in 1795. This period definitively established French as the language of social promotion, far more ...
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7 votes
3 answers
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Examples of Umlaut in a living language

For a teaching material I needed a good example of vocalic mutation of the root, aka Umlaut, and I got stuck at the fact that, while the Umlaut is often postulated for some reconstructed languages, ...
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When are we not able to make regressive nasal assimilation in phonetics?

I remember my teacher saying something about when we can ellide the schwa and something about syllabic nasals ("often more" as an example of a case where we cannot do regressive nasal assimilation due ...
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Different assimilation directions

Here's a question I posed to a prominent researcher in French phonology during my undergrad. We didn't spend a ton of time on it, but we couldn't come up with a satisfactory solution. Now that I've ...
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5 votes
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What languages have rounding assimilation/harmony with glides?

Specifically, I'm looking for languages with a [j]/[ɥ] or [j]/[w] alternation that is triggered by the presence of a round vowel. For a hypothetical example with nonce words consider: (1) a. [ken] + [...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Assimilation Help

The practice question is below. I am having trouble understanding what assimilation means in this context. Also, I don't understand why unbelievable is pronounced umbelievable when spoken fast via ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Assimilation: What is the process in which both phonemes change?

The process in which one sound becomes more like a nearby sound is called assimilation. In assimilation mostly one sound changes but what is the process in which two sounds are changed? Consider the ...
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10 votes
2 answers
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Did PIE *h3 cause voicing in any other words than the "drink" word?

The Proto-Indo-European "third laryngeal", *h3, is often assumed to have been a voiced sound based on the fact that some reflexes of the "drink" root *peh3- appear to show voicing assimilation of p to ...
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2 answers
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How to write sonorant assimilation rule? [closed]

I was wondering how the formally write the rule for assimilation; for example: Finnish mp -> mm ŋk -> ŋŋ nt -> nn lt -> ll rt -> rr I'm guessing it's assimilation when the preceeding consonant ...
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0 answers
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Modifications of consonants

Could you help me to figure out one thing? My task is to comment on the modifications of consonants by the neighbouring sounds(assimilation,ellision). But there are some words in the task where I don'...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Secondary articulation vs assimilation

I was teaching a linguistics class and I came across this topic "secondary articulation". It was the first time for me to hear the term. I had always known that the effect of a preceding or following ...
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13 votes
1 answer
5k views

How does vowel harmony typically arise in a language?

How does vowel harmony typically arise in a language? Here's a definition of vowel harmony from the WALS chapter on Vowel Quality Inventories: http://wals.info/chapter/2. "When a language is ...
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7 votes
5 answers
290 views

Is the second “ρ” in “διάρροια” from “διά” + “ῥέω” due to an assimilation?

Or which phenomenon is causing this? Is there a known reason or rule behind this?
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